I only eat - uh - normal stuff

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Modom, Mar 7, 2004.

  1. Lynne

    Lynne Guest

    <eyeroll> Makes you wonder what cave these people lived in.
    Surprising if they didn't have rickets and scurvy.

    "Rona Yuthasastrakosol" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]...
    > Have I ever mentioned the 27-year old university graduate
    > I worked with
    who
    > did not know what a citrus fruit was? This person was
    > employed by the federal government yet couldn't even name
    > a citrus fruit to save her life.
    >
    > rona
    > --
    > ***For e-mail, replace .com with .ca Sorry for the
    > inconvenience!***
     


  2. Lynne

    Lynne Guest

    <eyeroll> Makes you wonder what cave these people lived in.
    Surprising if they didn't have rickets and scurvy.

    "Rona Yuthasastrakosol" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]...
    > Have I ever mentioned the 27-year old university graduate
    > I worked with
    who
    > did not know what a citrus fruit was? This person was
    > employed by the federal government yet couldn't even name
    > a citrus fruit to save her life.
    >
    > rona
    > --
    > ***For e-mail, replace .com with .ca Sorry for the
    > inconvenience!***
     
  3. Gabby

    Gabby Guest

    "Frogleg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Yes, I read how you worked "one summer" in a box factory.
    > And when your shift was over, did you explore the factory
    > and find out all you could about the process?

    I tried that when I worked in a plant that made electrical
    components. I'm very curious, so I asked my supervisors what
    was done with the components we were making. "They're put in
    boxes and shipped to Montreal." "No, no, I mean what are
    they used for?" "We have no reason to know that. Ours is
    only to make sure they meet the specs." "Okay, sorry I
    asked." Nobody, but nobody had any interest beyond their
    little machine that spun wires.

    Gabby
     
  4. Gabby

    Gabby Guest

    "Frogleg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Yes, I read how you worked "one summer" in a box factory.
    > And when your shift was over, did you explore the factory
    > and find out all you could about the process?

    I tried that when I worked in a plant that made electrical
    components. I'm very curious, so I asked my supervisors what
    was done with the components we were making. "They're put in
    boxes and shipped to Montreal." "No, no, I mean what are
    they used for?" "We have no reason to know that. Ours is
    only to make sure they meet the specs." "Okay, sorry I
    asked." Nobody, but nobody had any interest beyond their
    little machine that spun wires.

    Gabby
     
  5. Kalanamak

    Kalanamak Guest

    modom wrote:

    > This doesn't seem to follow. You are talking to an
    > imaginary modom, not me.

    Our petit cuisses de grenouille has a tendency to grab the
    odd subject (even more oddly, having to do with grocery
    stores as a rule) and get all het up about it, while
    twisting his/her knickers up with a steadfastly
    incorrectible misinterpretation. One is reminded of the old
    story of the man who's right leg has a fight with his left.
    A for apatheic people working in stores, there are mouth-
    breathers in many public service jobs. They serve as a
    reminder to count one's lucky stars. blacksalt Ob Food: I
    modified this favourite recipe (due to a lack of sesame oil)
    by using champagne vinegar, toasted walnut oil and italian
    parsley. It was polished off, and 5 people asked for the
    recipe. <begin paste of recipe>
    > This is From the Earth by Eileen Yin-Fei Lo. She
    > claims it a Cantonese dish. Not only does it use the
    > yams raw, it was very refreshing. It will be a
    > frequent repeater for me.
    >
    > 1 1/4 lb sweet taters or yams Peel, wash and dry. Cut in
    > half lengthwise and put the flat side down and then cut
    > downward to make thin strips (3/16th was my goal), and cut
    > these into 2 inch lengths. I put this in something
    > tupperwarish, poured over 3 T brown rice vinegar (rec says
    > white vinegar), 1 teas dark sesame oil, 1 1/2 T sugar and
    > a teas. of salt. Marinate overnight, shaking once or twice
    > and toss with fresh coriander (she says 1 teas chopped, I
    > used 2 T and left them leaves just pulled off the stems),
    > and serve cool.
     
  6. Kalanamak

    Kalanamak Guest

    modom wrote:

    > This doesn't seem to follow. You are talking to an
    > imaginary modom, not me.

    Our petit cuisses de grenouille has a tendency to grab the
    odd subject (even more oddly, having to do with grocery
    stores as a rule) and get all het up about it, while
    twisting his/her knickers up with a steadfastly
    incorrectible misinterpretation. One is reminded of the old
    story of the man who's right leg has a fight with his left.
    A for apatheic people working in stores, there are mouth-
    breathers in many public service jobs. They serve as a
    reminder to count one's lucky stars. blacksalt Ob Food: I
    modified this favourite recipe (due to a lack of sesame oil)
    by using champagne vinegar, toasted walnut oil and italian
    parsley. It was polished off, and 5 people asked for the
    recipe. <begin paste of recipe>
    > This is From the Earth by Eileen Yin-Fei Lo. She
    > claims it a Cantonese dish. Not only does it use the
    > yams raw, it was very refreshing. It will be a
    > frequent repeater for me.
    >
    > 1 1/4 lb sweet taters or yams Peel, wash and dry. Cut in
    > half lengthwise and put the flat side down and then cut
    > downward to make thin strips (3/16th was my goal), and cut
    > these into 2 inch lengths. I put this in something
    > tupperwarish, poured over 3 T brown rice vinegar (rec says
    > white vinegar), 1 teas dark sesame oil, 1 1/2 T sugar and
    > a teas. of salt. Marinate overnight, shaking once or twice
    > and toss with fresh coriander (she says 1 teas chopped, I
    > used 2 T and left them leaves just pulled off the stems),
    > and serve cool.
     
  7. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 17:58:02 -0800, kalanamak <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >modom wrote:
    >
    >> This doesn't seem to follow. You are talking to an
    >> imaginary modom, not me.
    >
    >Our petit cuisses de grenouille has a tendency to grab the
    >odd subject (even more oddly, having to do with grocery
    >stores as a rule) and get all het up about it, while
    >twisting his/her knickers up with a steadfastly
    >incorrectible misinterpretation. One is reminded of the old
    >story of the man who's right leg has a fight with his left.
    >A for apatheic people working in stores, there are mouth-
    >breathers in many public service jobs. They serve as a
    >reminder to count one's lucky stars.

    Please don't condescend in French. Many don't understand
    this. (BTW, it's cuisse de grenouille -- singular). My
    objections come up both in connection with grocery store
    (clerks) and restaurants (wait staff). This group often
    produces long threads of anecdotal material to illustrate
    how stupid, rude, lazy, uninformed, and generally sub-normal
    those in service jobs are. Particularly in contrast to their
    own dear enlightened, meticulously polite, graceful, and
    discriminating selves. This is, indeed, one of the things
    that pushes my buttons. And I am consistently surprised at
    how little support my position ever gets. I have certainly
    experienced bad and exasperating service. I just don't think
    it's fair to infer an entire character from one 5-minute
    encounter.

    As for misinterpretation, I cut this from another of my
    posts on the subject --

    >"...tried in vain to look up my veggies..." "Her tragic
    >look..." "...bar code to the rescue!..." "I pipe
    >cheerfully.... She searched and searched." "...her eyes
    >grow sheets of Plexiglass and her posture displays the same
    >lack of attention I've seen in a dachshund with a full
    >belly." "The dear child at the register..."

    Think about it this way. Would *you* like to be so
    described? Is there a gentler, or at least less personal way
    to put this? "I can't believe a store clerk wouldn't know
    the difference between a lime and a kiwi" would generate a
    lively enough thread. In this benighted corner of Virginia,
    I nearly always have to explain an artichoke to *somebody*,
    incl. other customers. I don't take it as a signal the
    questioner is a cretin.
     
  8. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 17:58:02 -0800, kalanamak <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >modom wrote:
    >
    >> This doesn't seem to follow. You are talking to an
    >> imaginary modom, not me.
    >
    >Our petit cuisses de grenouille has a tendency to grab the
    >odd subject (even more oddly, having to do with grocery
    >stores as a rule) and get all het up about it, while
    >twisting his/her knickers up with a steadfastly
    >incorrectible misinterpretation. One is reminded of the old
    >story of the man who's right leg has a fight with his left.
    >A for apatheic people working in stores, there are mouth-
    >breathers in many public service jobs. They serve as a
    >reminder to count one's lucky stars.

    Please don't condescend in French. Many don't understand
    this. (BTW, it's cuisse de grenouille -- singular). My
    objections come up both in connection with grocery store
    (clerks) and restaurants (wait staff). This group often
    produces long threads of anecdotal material to illustrate
    how stupid, rude, lazy, uninformed, and generally sub-normal
    those in service jobs are. Particularly in contrast to their
    own dear enlightened, meticulously polite, graceful, and
    discriminating selves. This is, indeed, one of the things
    that pushes my buttons. And I am consistently surprised at
    how little support my position ever gets. I have certainly
    experienced bad and exasperating service. I just don't think
    it's fair to infer an entire character from one 5-minute
    encounter.

    As for misinterpretation, I cut this from another of my
    posts on the subject --

    >"...tried in vain to look up my veggies..." "Her tragic
    >look..." "...bar code to the rescue!..." "I pipe
    >cheerfully.... She searched and searched." "...her eyes
    >grow sheets of Plexiglass and her posture displays the same
    >lack of attention I've seen in a dachshund with a full
    >belly." "The dear child at the register..."

    Think about it this way. Would *you* like to be so
    described? Is there a gentler, or at least less personal way
    to put this? "I can't believe a store clerk wouldn't know
    the difference between a lime and a kiwi" would generate a
    lively enough thread. In this benighted corner of Virginia,
    I nearly always have to explain an artichoke to *somebody*,
    incl. other customers. I don't take it as a signal the
    questioner is a cretin.
     
  9. Gabby

    Gabby Guest

    "Rona Yuthasastrakosol" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > It's amazing to me how many excuses people can make for
    > doing a shitty job and being lazy. "I'm getting paid
    > minimum wage so it's OK if
    I
    > do a crap job." Have some pride in your work and yourself
    > (that's a
    general
    > "your"), for god sake.
    >
    > rona

    I look at it this way: Even a minimum wage job will get you
    a good reference if you do it well.

    Gabby
     
  10. Gabby

    Gabby Guest

    "Rona Yuthasastrakosol" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > It's amazing to me how many excuses people can make for
    > doing a shitty job and being lazy. "I'm getting paid
    > minimum wage so it's OK if
    I
    > do a crap job." Have some pride in your work and yourself
    > (that's a
    general
    > "your"), for god sake.
    >
    > rona

    I look at it this way: Even a minimum wage job will get you
    a good reference if you do it well.

    Gabby
     
  11. "Gabby" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > I look at it this way: Even a minimum wage job will get
    > you a good
    reference
    > if you do it well.
    >
    > Gabby
    >
    >

    And even promote you if you do well! Or give you a bad
    reference if you do a crappy job! Right now I'm working with
    under-employed youths in a training program (they're placed
    in federal government internships). Many of them don't even
    have a basic understanding of proper behaviour on the job--
    like showing up to work on time or calling if they're going
    to be late or absent. It's very frustrating. But there are
    the wonderful few who do so well, they are hired as
    permanent federal government staff after their internships.
    For them, going from no job and no work experience to a
    minimum wage internship is quite a feat, but then moving on
    to a very well-paying federal government job is an amazing
    accomplishment! But you just don't get that by doing the
    least amount of work possible and by showing no initiative
    whatsoever.

    rona
    --
    ***For e-mail, replace .com with .ca Sorry for the
    inconvenience!***
     
  12. "Gabby" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > I look at it this way: Even a minimum wage job will get
    > you a good
    reference
    > if you do it well.
    >
    > Gabby
    >
    >

    And even promote you if you do well! Or give you a bad
    reference if you do a crappy job! Right now I'm working with
    under-employed youths in a training program (they're placed
    in federal government internships). Many of them don't even
    have a basic understanding of proper behaviour on the job--
    like showing up to work on time or calling if they're going
    to be late or absent. It's very frustrating. But there are
    the wonderful few who do so well, they are hired as
    permanent federal government staff after their internships.
    For them, going from no job and no work experience to a
    minimum wage internship is quite a feat, but then moving on
    to a very well-paying federal government job is an amazing
    accomplishment! But you just don't get that by doing the
    least amount of work possible and by showing no initiative
    whatsoever.

    rona
    --
    ***For e-mail, replace .com with .ca Sorry for the
    inconvenience!***
     
  13. Default User

    Default User Guest

    Rona Yuthasastrakosol wrote:

    > And even promote you if you do well! Or give you a bad
    > reference if you do a crappy job!

    These days, most companies won't give bad references because
    they are afraid of being sued. They merely confirm dates of
    employment, positions held, and other factual stuff.

    Brian Rodenborn
     
  14. Default User

    Default User Guest

    Rona Yuthasastrakosol wrote:

    > And even promote you if you do well! Or give you a bad
    > reference if you do a crappy job!

    These days, most companies won't give bad references because
    they are afraid of being sued. They merely confirm dates of
    employment, positions held, and other factual stuff.

    Brian Rodenborn
     
  15. Notbob

    Notbob Guest

    On 2004-03-08, modom <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Why do people who don't like food work in food stores?

    Probably for the same reason people shop in food stores
    ...to live.

    Seriously, I have a theory about food luddites. I figure
    they're just taste bud challenged. Just like you have "super
    tasters" (discussed here before), you have the other end of
    the spectrum. People who have been biologically saddled with
    a shortage of taste buds. I think these people really can't
    appreciate the differences in more exotic fare. To them,
    it's down to texture. Haven't you ever heard someone say,
    "Eeeooww, I hate the texture of_______(fill in blank)"?
    Let's face it, if you can't taste it, why bother?

    nb
     
  16. Mark Shaw

    Mark Shaw Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    modom <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Poblanos are used for chile rellenos. Did you ever have
    >a chile relleno? Her reply is the headline. She lives
    >in Texas.

    Poblanos are used for rellenos in Texas. Proper rellenos are
    made with green chiles, of course.

    --
    Mark Shaw contact info at homepage -->
    http://www.panix.com/~mshaw
    ========================================================================

    "The longer you go, the more the music gets into the walls."

    - Muddy Waters
     
  17. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Lynne"
    <(name+)[email protected]> wrote:

    > To this day I can not understand how any American high
    > school graduate can not know what a lime looks like.

    I can understand lots of ways. Living in a small town, Mommy
    and Daddy don't like limes or just never got exposed to
    them. People on this group are interested in food, so we
    keep our eyes open. People who aren't interested in food
    (except as fuel) could easily pass through the produce
    section a thousand times and never see the limes, or see
    them and not bother to wonder what they are.

    --
    Dan Abel Sonoma State University AIS [email protected]
     
  18. Hal Laurent

    Hal Laurent Guest

    "Mark Shaw" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > modom <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >Poblanos are used for chile rellenos. Did you ever have
    > >a chile relleno? Her reply is the headline. She lives
    > >in Texas.
    >
    > Poblanos are used for rellenos in Texas. Proper rellenos
    > are made with green chiles, of course.

    Huh? Chile poblanos *are* green.

    Hal Laurent Baltimore
     
  19. Goomba38

    Goomba38 Guest

    Dan Abel wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, "Lynne"
    > <(name+)[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > To this day I can not understand how any American
    > > high school graduate can not know what a lime looks
    > > like.
    >
    > I can understand lots of ways. Living in a small town,
    > Mommy and Daddy don't like limes or just never got exposed
    > to them. People on this group are interested in food, so
    > we keep our eyes open. People who aren't interested in
    > food (except as fuel) could easily pass through the
    > produce section a thousand times and never see the limes,
    > or see them and not bother to wonder what they are.

    It's hard for me to imagine a life of such UNobservation?
    Flip through a magazine and not notice things? Never see
    limes as you picked up apples in the market? Never saw a
    picture of a lime on the shampoo bottle and read the
    label? Goomba
     
  20. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Frogleg
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 11:40:12 -0600, modom
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >I wrote:
    > >>>>>Why do people who don't like food work in food
    > >>>>>stores?

    > >>>>For the money, you mean toad. There are millions of
    > >>>>people in this

    > >I wrote:
    > >>>Mean toad? A Frogleg called a modom a toad!

    > >Frogleg wrote:
    > >>And I thought long and hard about it, too. It's the
    > >>first time I've ever made an ad hominem attack in a
    > >>newsgroup.

    > female. The tone of lordly superiority at the clerk's
    > failure to rise

    Aha, now we have it! It was his tone of voice that did it.
    One of the biggest barriers to communication on newsgroups
    is the lack of non-written signals. You have assumed that
    his writing style reflects what he thinks about people.

    You need to buy a new sense of humor. The old one is
    seriously broken.

    --
    Dan Abel Sonoma State University AIS [email protected]
     
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