I only eat - uh - normal stuff

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Modom, Mar 7, 2004.

  1. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    Frogleg wrote:
    >
    > On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 09:54:23 -0500, Nancy Young

    > >Frogleg wrote:
    reading the situation far too
    > >harshly. He didn't berate the woman or anything,
    >
    > "...tried in vain to look up my veggies..." "Her tragic
    > look..." "...bar code to the rescue!..." "I pipe
    > cheerfully.... She searched and searched." "...her eyes
    > grow sheets of Plexiglass and her posture displays the
    > same lack of attention I've seen in a dachshund with a
    > full belly." "The dear child at the register..."

    So? He wrote what he saw.

    > He may not have told her she was an idiot to her face, but
    > he held her up to ridicule to 'amuse' *us*.

    I wasn't amused as much as interested.

    > >Okay, I was taken aback, I thought, does this store not
    > >sell kiwis? If she was at all curious, why not take a
    > >spin around the produce aisle. I would! People here have
    > >mentioned many, MANY things that I have made a point to
    > >seek out next time I was in the grocery store so I'd know
    > >what they were talking about.
    >
    > Not to continue my role as attack frog, but how many times
    > have you actually done that?

    I said many, MANY.

    > >Actually, it should, in my opinion, be mandatory for the
    > >checkout people to have a pretty good knowledge of the
    > >produce available in the store. It's part of their job to
    > >know what it is. They have to check it out.

    > >Now, Mike probably did not need to know what happened
    > >elsewhere in the factory, it didn't impact his job.
    > >Apples and oranges.
    >
    > But he *said* it was her lack of alertness and curiousity
    > that peeved him so badly,

    There you go again. He didn't seem in the least bit peeved.

    > not that she was poorly trained. He says he's held McJobs,
    > but doesn't mention *his* curiousity and interest in
    > finding out all he could. That is, it's ok to have a
    > crappy job during the summer and pay no attention because
    > you're going to be back in school in the fall (I'm making
    > assumptions here), but if you work at a McJob to survive,
    > you *must* be bright and ambitious and curious. Apples and
    > oranges, indeed.

    Yes, he only needed to know how to glue boxes. The cashier
    needed to know what an item was in order to check it out.
    The two situations do not compare.

    Besides, I've had many low wage jobs and I *always* went
    above and beyond my job description. Minimum wage in high
    school, worked for the NYC library system, if I ran out of
    my assigned work, I learned how to repair books or run the
    projector for the movies they showed or read shelves for a
    different section of the library. I could have sat there and
    picked my teeth and still been paid. That's not
    me. I have a good work ethic.

    I would have known what limes were, and if I wondered what
    kiwis were, I would have looked on my way out the door.

    No wonder people complain about younger workers, seems it's
    become okay for them to just go through the motions.

    nancy
     


  2. Goomba38

    Goomba38 Guest

    Nancy Young wrote:

    > Besides, I've had many low wage jobs and I *always* went
    > above and beyond my job description. Minimum wage in high
    > school, worked for the NYC library system, if I ran out of
    > my assigned work, I learned how to repair books or run the
    > projector for the movies they showed or read shelves for a
    > different section of the library. nancy

    See? I *knew* there was a reason you were so good at
    handling the RFC Cookbook! That HS experience bode you
    well. :) Goomba
     
  3. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 12:51:04 -0800, [email protected] (Dan Abel) wrote:

    >Frogleg <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 11:40:12 -0600, modom
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> >>>>>Why do people who don't like food work in food
    >> >>>>>stores?
    >
    >> >>>>For the money, you mean toad. There are millions of
    >> >>>>people in this
    >
    >> The tone of lordly superiority at the clerk's failure
    >> to rise
    >
    >Aha, now we have it! It was his tone of voice that did it.
    >One of the biggest barriers to communication on newsgroups
    >is the lack of non-written signals. You have assumed that
    >his writing style reflects what he thinks about people.

    In the original msg and one follow-up:

    >"...tried in vain to look up my veggies..." "Her tragic
    >look..." "...bar code to the rescue!..." "I pipe
    >cheerfully.... She searched and searched." "...her eyes
    >grow sheets of Plexiglass and her posture displays the same
    >lack of attention I've seen in a dachshund with a full
    >belly." "The dear child at the register..."

    I interpret this as a lordly tone of superiority.
    >
    >You need to buy a new sense of humor. The old one is
    >seriously broken.

    I certainly hope I will continue to be unamused by meanness
    and total lack of empathy.

    I don't understand why *I* am getting so much flak for this.
    Maybe I should post a funny story about the deficiencies of
    someone who isn't as bright or experienced as I am, making
    sure to demonstrate my own superiority.

    Nope. Can't do it. The first thing I thought of was when I
    made hummus for a non-foodie friend. She asked what it was,
    and drew a blank when I told her. Chickpeas and garbanzos,
    much less tahini also were not in her frame of reference. I
    started on a dissertation of middle-eastern food, and then
    stopped myself. "Bean dip," I said. "Very good bean dip,"
    she responded immediately. But this doesn't put *her* in a
    poor light. *I* was the one trying to be a smarty-pants, and
    left with egg (or bean dip) on my face.

    If all of rfc thinks that making fun of what they fondly
    consider to be inferiors is hilarious, I think it's not good
    company to be in.
     
  4. Goomba38

    Goomba38 Guest

    Frogleg wrote:

    > In this benighted corner of Virginia, I nearly always
    > have to explain an artichoke to *somebody*, incl. other
    > customers. I don't take it as a signal the questioner is
    > a cretin.

    Sadly, having known a few incredibly dense unobservant
    folks, unless it was early in her market checker career, she
    had to have checked out a few before, don't you think? Maybe
    it was bad long term memory...not just her cretinism? Goomba
     
  5. "Default User" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > These days, most companies won't give bad references
    > because they are afraid of being sued. They merely
    > confirm dates of employment, positions held, and other
    > factual stuff.
    >
    >
    >
    > Brian Rodenborn

    I live in Canada. Not as much suing going on, so employers
    are not as afraid of giving you a bad reference (though a
    carefully-worded bad reference).

    rona

    --
    ***For e-mail, replace .com with .ca Sorry for the
    inconvenience!***
     
  6. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Rona Yuthasastrakosol"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I live in Canada. Not as much suing going on, so employers
    > are not as afraid of giving you a bad reference (though a
    > carefully-worded bad reference).

    Sometimes so carefully worded that it isn't understood! I
    was on a search committee many years ago. One woman had no
    job experience. She had been a mother and an artist, and had
    gone back to school to learn about computers. She answered
    all of our questions well, but I had some doubt about her
    personality, as did another member of the committee. The man
    who I thought was going to be her supervisor had no problems
    with it. He checked her references, including a computer
    intership at a large company near here. He reported:

    Q: What can you tell me about candidate X?
    R: She was a very good worker.
    S: Would you hire her?
    T: No.
    U: Why not?
    V: She isn't management material.

    This was kind of strange, since she wasn't doing anything
    like management work for them as an intern. We figured that
    since we were hiring a lower level computer person, her
    ability to manage didn't matter, and so we hired her. The
    guy who was going to be her supervisor left before she
    started. I soon figured that the reason he wouldn't have had
    a problem with her was because he would have ignored her
    problems. She would have had an *enormous* problem with
    *him*, and it would have been a total disaster. As it was,
    it was a total disaster anyway, because she couldn't get
    along with *anyone*.

    Upon thinking about it later, I realized that "not
    management material" was a code phrase for "can't get along
    with other people".

    --
    Dan Abel Sonoma State University AIS [email protected]
     
  7. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Goomba38
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Dan Abel wrote:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>, "Lynne"
    > > <(name+)[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > To this day I can not understand how any American
    > > > high school graduate can not know what a lime looks
    > > > like.
    > >
    > > I can understand lots of ways. Living in a small town,
    > > Mommy and Daddy don't like limes or just never got
    > > exposed to them. People on this group are interested in
    > > food, so we keep our eyes open. People who aren't
    > > interested in food (except as fuel) could easily pass
    > > through the produce section a thousand times and never
    > > see the limes, or see them and not bother to wonder what
    > > they are.
    >
    > It's hard for me to imagine a life of such
    > UNobservation? Flip through a magazine and not notice
    > things? Never see limes as you picked up apples in the
    > market? Never saw a picture of a lime on the shampoo
    > bottle and read the label?

    I wouldn't expect to find many American HS graduates who
    wouldn't know what a lime looks like, but I wouldn't say
    that I cannot understand it. I know this group (plus
    experience gained *after* high school) has broadened my food
    understanding.

    Where I grew up, *everyone* knew that chili had beans in it.
    The idea that you could even *call* it chili if it didn't
    have beans was unthinkable. Furthermore, *everyone* knew
    that a Mexican restaurant was the place to get chili. If a
    restaurant had chili on its menu and it wasn't a Mexican
    restaurant, you *knew* it came out of a can. Furthmore,
    *everyone* knew that chili was made with hamburger.

    Our friends from Texas here *don't* know that chili has
    beans in it, in fact the idea infuriates them. Where I live
    now, the Mexican restaurants are all completely 100% staffed
    by Mexicans, and chili is *never* on the menu.

    --
    Dan Abel Sonoma State University AIS [email protected]
     
  8. Mark Shaw

    Mark Shaw Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Hal Laurent" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >"Mark Shaw" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:p[email protected]...
    >>
    >> Poblanos are used for rellenos in Texas. Proper rellenos
    >> are made with green chiles, of course.
    >
    >Huh? Chile poblanos *are* green.

    Ha! Yeah, but they aren't green chiles. Like Big Jims,
    Anaheims or Hatches.

    --
    Mark Shaw contact info at homepage -->
    http://www.panix.com/~mshaw
    ========================================================================

    "There are 10 types of people in the world: those who can
    count in binary, and those who cannot." -unknown
     
  9. A.C.

    A.C. Guest

    > > > > To this day I can not understand how any American
    > > > > high school
    graduate
    > > > > can not know what a lime looks like.
    > > >
    > > > I can understand lots of ways. Living in a small town,
    > > > Mommy and
    Daddy
    > > > don't like limes or just never got exposed to them.
    > > > People on this
    group
    > > > are interested in food, so we keep our eyes open.
    > > > People who aren't interested in food (except as fuel)
    > > > could easily pass through the
    produce
    > > > section a thousand times and never see the limes, or
    > > > see them and not bother to wonder what they are.
    > >
    > > It's hard for me to imagine a life of such
    > > UNobservation? Flip through a magazine and not notice
    > > things? Never see limes as you picked up apples
    in the
    > > market? Never saw a picture of a lime on the shampoo
    > > bottle and read
    the
    > > label?
    >
    >
    > I wouldn't expect to find many American HS graduates who
    > wouldn't know what a lime looks like, but I wouldn't say
    > that I cannot understand it. I know this group (plus
    > experience gained *after* high school) has broadened my
    > food understanding.
    >
    > Where I grew up, *everyone* knew that chili had beans in
    > it. The idea that you could even *call* it chili if it
    > didn't have beans was unthinkable. Furthermore, *everyone*
    > knew that a Mexican restaurant was the place to get chili.
    > If a restaurant had chili on its menu and it wasn't a
    > Mexican restaurant, you *knew* it came out of a can.
    > Furthmore, *everyone* knew that chili was made with
    > hamburger.
    >
    > Our friends from Texas here *don't* know that chili has
    > beans in it, in fact the idea infuriates them. Where I
    > live now, the Mexican restaurants are all completely 100%
    > staffed by Mexicans, and chili is *never* on the menu.
    >

    i grew up in the south east and chili could just as well be
    a topper for a hotdog along with slaw and mustard, and the
    chili never had beans in it. unless it was designated as
    'chili beans'

    ac
     
  10. Hal Laurent

    Hal Laurent Guest

    "Mark Shaw" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:D[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, "Hal Laurent"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >Huh? Chile poblanos *are* green.
    >
    > Ha! Yeah, but they aren't green chiles. Like Big Jims,
    > Anaheims or Hatches.

    Hmm, I see you learned the English language at the Alice In
    Wonderland school where words mean whatever you want them
    to mean. :)

    Hal Laurent Baltimore
     
  11. Miche

    Miche Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    modom <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Why do people who don't like food work in food stores?

    A supermarchet isn't just a "food store". I worked in a
    supermarchet in order to be able to afford to go to
    university, not because I loved the merchandise (spit) or my
    co-workers (ha).

    Miche

    --
    If you want to end war and stuff you got to sing loud. --
    Arlo Guthrie, "Alice's Restaurant"
     
  12. Zxcvbob

    Zxcvbob Guest

    Hal Laurent wrote:

    > "Mark Shaw" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:D[email protected]...
    >
    >>In article <[email protected]>, "Hal Laurent"
    >><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Huh? Chile poblanos *are* green.
    >>
    >>Ha! Yeah, but they aren't green chiles. Like Big Jims,
    >>Anaheims or Hatches.
    >
    >
    > Hmm, I see you learned the English language at the Alice
    > In Wonderland school where words mean whatever you want
    > them to mean. :)
    >

    ...but you have to pay them extra.

    Best regards, Bob
     
  13. Miche

    Miche Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Robin Cowdrey" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Tried to slice the avocado but the pit got in the way so
    > it's McDs again tonight!

    Take the pit out. It's easy enough. Get a heavy knife, hit
    the seed hard with the blade (so that it sticks in the
    seed), and give it a twist. The seed comes right out. Then
    you can carefully remove it from the knife blade (put a tea-
    towel in your other hand so it doesn't slip).

    > Ate faggots (snickers aside, they are made from ground
    > liver, pork belly, herbs and wrapped in caul), peas and
    > chips last Friday at a friend's home, had to do a number
    > on my head, but it was tasty, I must admit. Reminded me of
    > haggis and haslet. We had an interesting conversation
    > about offal being the food of the poor a generation or
    > three ago. Were it not for food factories and 'modern'
    > farming practices it's what most of us would be eating
    > today. Mad cow, srapie, salmonella, e-coli or offal! What
    > a choice!

    Or you could come to New Zealand, where we do not have
    a problem with mad cow, scrapie, salmonella or e-coli
    in our meat.

    Miche (mmmm, offal)

    --
    If you want to end war and stuff you got to sing loud. --
    Arlo Guthrie, "Alice's Restaurant"
     
  14. Modom

    Modom Guest

    On 15 Mar 2004 17:07:32 -0500, [email protected] (Mark Shaw) wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, "Hal Laurent"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>"Mark Shaw" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:p[email protected]...
    >>>
    >>> Poblanos are used for rellenos in Texas. Proper rellenos
    >>> are made with green chiles, of course.
    >>
    >>Huh? Chile poblanos *are* green.
    >
    >Ha! Yeah, but they aren't green chiles. Like Big Jims,
    >Anaheims or Hatches.

    True enough, but what about the people who call a poblano a
    pasilla? Or is it a pasilla a poblano?

    Anyhow, i wasn't aware that poblanos rellenos was Tex-Mex,
    though doubtless I should have known.

    modom
     
  15. Modom

    Modom Guest

    On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 15:28:45 -0800, [email protected] (Dan Abel) wrote:

    >Where I grew up, *everyone* knew that chili had beans in
    >it. The idea that you could even *call* it chili if it
    >didn't have beans was unthinkable. Furthermore, *everyone*
    >knew that a Mexican restaurant was the place to get chili.
    >If a restaurant had chili on its menu and it wasn't a
    >Mexican restaurant, you *knew* it came out of a can.
    >Furthmore, *everyone* knew that chili was made with
    >hamburger.
    >
    >Our friends from Texas here *don't* know that chili has
    >beans in it, in fact the idea infuriates them. Where I live
    >now, the Mexican restaurants are all completely 100%
    >staffed by Mexicans, and chili is *never* on the menu.

    Yup, chili isn't Mexican food.

    modom
     
  16. "Dan Abel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, "Rona
    > Yuthasastrakosol" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > > I live in Canada. Not as much suing going on, so
    > > employers are not as afraid of giving you a bad
    > > reference (though a carefully-worded bad reference).
    >
    >
    > Sometimes so carefully worded that it isn't understood!

    True! You really have to ask the right questions but one
    problem is that some questions are (at least in Canada)
    against human rights codes to ask! With the program I work
    for (places youths with little to no work experience in
    federal goverment internships), people who have criminal
    records are not eligible but we're not allowed to ask, "Do
    you have a criminal record?" How stupid is that? In the last
    three months we've had to let go three participants (and we
    may have to let go a few more) because they did not pass the
    security clearance. Although we tell them at the outset that
    if they have a criminal record they need to talk with us,
    none of them did. It's annoying because the mentors feel
    we've wasted their time and other people without criminal
    records could have gotten into the program instead. Oh well,
    at least we haven't been sued!

    rona

    --
    ***For e-mail, replace .com with .ca Sorry for the
    inconvenience!***
     
  17. Mark Shaw

    Mark Shaw Guest

    Hal Laurent <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "Mark Shaw" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:D[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > >Huh? Chile poblanos *are* green.
    > >
    > > Ha! Yeah, but they aren't green chiles. Like Big Jims,
    > > Anaheims or Hatches.

    > Hmm, I see you learned the English language at the Alice
    > In Wonderland school where words mean whatever you want
    > them to mean. :)

    At least I know what a green chile is. See the image at the
    bottom of this page:

    http://southwesthotgifts.com/page2.html#frozen

    Them ain't poblanos, son. Roast. Peel. Slit. Stuff with
    cheese. Dip in batter. Deep-fry. Now *that's* a relleno!

    > Hal Laurent Baltimore

    Heh. A Yankee. I shoulda known.... :)

    --
    Mark Shaw anti-spam: change 'bang' to 'not' to email me
    ========================================================================

    "This time I think the Americans are serious. Bush is not
    like Clinton. I think this is the end." - Uday Hussein,
    April 2003
     
  18. Kswck

    Kswck Guest

    > Where I grew up, *everyone* knew that chili had beans in
    > it. The idea that you could even *call* it chili if it
    > didn't have beans was unthinkable. Furthermore, *everyone*
    > knew that a Mexican restaurant was the place to get chili.
    > If a restaurant had chili on its menu and it wasn't a
    > Mexican restaurant, you *knew* it came out of a can.
    > Furthmore, *everyone* knew that chili was made with
    > hamburger.
    >

    I do not know where the notion of chili w/o beans came from.
    But chili in the old west was not a specific recipe-rather
    it was a stew-type of food based on that which was available
    in whatever region the wagon-train(for lack of a better
    description) was in. It was a bit of meat, a bit of whatever
    wild herbs were available, whatever was left over, etc. The
    use of beans was a filler-nothing more.
     
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