I-Pod war?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Bill Baka, Apr 6, 2006.

  1. Bill Baka

    Bill Baka Guest

    You guys amaze me.
    Some of you, at least.
    I posted a pointer to an article that was written about the possibility
    of I-Pods damaging a persons hearing, and it turned into a flame war.
    Chill, ride, summer is coming.
    Bill Baka
     
    Tags:


  2. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "Bill Baka" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > You guys amaze me.
    > Some of you, at least.
    > I posted a pointer to an article that was written about the possibility of
    > I-Pods damaging a persons hearing, and it turned into a flame war.
    > Chill, ride, summer is coming.
    > Bill Baka


    That's because a certain poster leapt at the opportunity to become the
    safety nanny for the newsgroup. Why people can't just STFU and mind their
    own business is beyond me.
     
  3. landotter

    landotter Guest

    My safety is my business, and I'll happily remind people to obey the
    law. Want to listen to an iPod and ride? Do it on the trainer. Wearing
    one on the bike path or street is being selfish and a finger in the eye
    of other's safety.

    I don't go on about helmets, that's personal choice, but riding the
    wrong way, or riding and choosing to cut off one of your senses affects
    everybody's safety.

    Your freedom ends where mine begins.
     
  4. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "landotter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > My safety is my business, and I'll happily remind people to obey the
    > law.


    You are not the police, you safety Nazi. Whatever happened to "live and let
    live"?

    Want to listen to an iPod and ride? Do it on the trainer. Wearing
    > one on the bike path or street is being selfish and a finger in the eye
    > of other's safety.


    You are in more danger of being run over by a harried motorist on a cell
    phone, or run into by a racer hammering head down.

    > I don't go on about helmets, that's personal choice, but riding the
    > wrong way, or riding and choosing to cut off one of your senses affects
    > everybody's safety.
    >
    > Your freedom ends where mine begins.


    Again, you have more to worry about than cyclists wearing headphones. Do you
    freak out in winter when they're wearing earmuffs or ear bands? How about on
    windy days? If you're such a wuss that cycling in public is that scary for
    you, I suggest you buy a Lifecycle.
     
  5. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    On Fri, 07 Apr 2006 02:52:57 GMT, "Gooserider"
    <[email protected]> wrote, in part:

    >Do you
    >freak out in winter when they're wearing earmuffs or ear bands?


    The point remains that wearing headphones or pair of ear-buds while
    operating a vehicle is illegal in many, if not most, jurisdictions.
    AFAIK, ear muffs aren't similarly proscribed.

    While the "safety" issue is often overblown there are liability
    issues. IOW, you might and likely will have a harder time getting
    compensation from insurers if you are wearing headphones when
    involved in a collision.

    Here it's technically illegal for pedestrians to have both ears
    covered with headphones or plugged with ear-buds while crossing the
    street. IMO that's merely a handy escape clause for the insurer.

    The problem with these laws is that they're not enforced unless it's
    strictly a hassle bust and excuse to shake down the offender.

    Now let's move on to a decent guns or dogs thread so we can get back
    to the regularly scheduled helmet wars.
    --
    zk
     
  6. jb

    jb Guest

    Jogging or bicycling with headphones on is inherently dangerous.
     
  7. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    jb wrote:

    > Jogging or bicycling with headphones on is inherently dangerous.


    So is getting out of bed in the morning.

    Bill "willing to risk it" S.
     
  8. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "jb" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:D[email protected]
    > Jogging or bicycling with headphones on is inherently dangerous.


    So is LIFE. Hell, so is bicycling in traffic. Why don't you just stay home
    under the covers?
     
  9. Marz

    Marz Guest

    jb wrote:
    > Jogging or bicycling with headphones on is inherently dangerous.



    No it's not.
    A car behind me is a car behind me whether I can hear it or not. Are
    you able to tell whether that car behind you is coming straight for you
    or is steering to go around you by hearing alone? Do you look back
    everytime you hear a car behind you? Do you ever make a change in
    direction without visually checking around you first? And you have to
    have your music on pretty loud not to be able to hear sirens and horns.

    And jogging, I always jog against traffic anyway to make sure I see
    who's gunning for me.


    laters,

    Marz
     
  10. Gooserider wrote:
    > "jb" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:D[email protected]
    > > Jogging or bicycling with headphones on is inherently dangerous.

    >
    > So is LIFE. Hell, so is bicycling in traffic. Why don't you just stay home
    > under the covers?


    Bed rest is quite dangerous too.

    But then the odds of living to 100 years are quite small.
     
  11. Edward Dolan

    Edward Dolan Guest

    "Gooserider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "jb" <[email protected]ol.com> wrote in message
    > news:D[email protected]
    >> Jogging or bicycling with headphones on is inherently dangerous.

    >
    > So is LIFE. Hell, so is bicycling in traffic. Why don't you just stay home
    > under the covers?


    It is best to sleep UNDER the bed. That way you fool those who would do you
    harm. They will expect you to be in bed, not under it. It is also good to
    have a shotgun at your side. You never know when you may need it.

    Regards,

    Ed Dolan the Great - Minnesota
    aka
    Saint Edward the Great - Order of the Perpetual Sorrows - Minnesota
     
  12. Marz

    Marz Guest

    Edward Dolan wrote:
    > "Gooserider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > "jb" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:D[email protected]
    > >> Jogging or bicycling with headphones on is inherently dangerous.

    > >
    > > So is LIFE. Hell, so is bicycling in traffic. Why don't you just stay home
    > > under the covers?

    >
    > It is best to sleep UNDER the bed. That way you fool those who would do you
    > harm. They will expect you to be in bed, not under it. It is also good to
    > have a shotgun at your side. You never know when you may need it.
    >


    But a clever man would know it's foolish to stay in the bed and it's
    safer to be under the bed, therefore the clever assassin would aim
    under the bed. To outwit the clever assassin it's safer to stay in the
    bed.

    http://72.224.21.212/epub/pbride/pbimages/vizz5.jpg

    Laters,

    Marz
     
  13. dgk

    dgk Guest

    On 6 Apr 2006 19:39:34 -0700, "landotter" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >My safety is my business, and I'll happily remind people to obey the
    >law. Want to listen to an iPod and ride? Do it on the trainer. Wearing
    >one on the bike path or street is being selfish and a finger in the eye
    >of other's safety.
    >
    >I don't go on about helmets, that's personal choice, but riding the
    >wrong way, or riding and choosing to cut off one of your senses affects
    >everybody's safety.
    >
    >Your freedom ends where mine begins.


    I listen to radio as I commute. I'm biking for over an hour each way,
    do you really expect me to waste that time? I rarely listen to music
    though, most of the time I have talk radio on. Usually Air America or
    Pacifica, that way I can actually learn something.

    Sometimes I listen to lectures or webcasts. I never have the volume
    high enough to intefere with hearing what's around me. In the summer I
    drive with the windows closed and music on. I can't hear a thing that
    occurs around the car.

    Just keep alert, that's the idea.

    Was there a huge debate when radios were first being installed in
    cars?
     
  14. andy gee

    andy gee Guest

    "Gooserider" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > That's because a certain poster leapt at the opportunity to become the
    > safety nanny for the newsgroup. Why people can't just STFU and mind
    > their own business is beyond me.


    I didn't get involved in the flame war, didn't even read it, but
    speaking of safety nannies, I have an observation:

    The other day I was riding down my local greenway. I was gaining on a
    rider and was contemplating passing. From behind, she looked properly
    kitted out and looked like a responsible rider, so I called out "passing
    left" and made my move. In one of those moments of inevitability, she
    apparently hadn't heard me and picked that moment to swing out to the
    left a little, possibly to avoid something on the ground, but adding a
    lot of anxiety to my pass. When I got a closer look, there, camoflogued
    by the helmet straps, were those tiny i-pod earphones. Had I been aware
    that she had earphones in, I definitely would have done the pass
    differently.

    This isn't just nitpicking and nannyism. She put us both at risk,
    myself unaware. In New York, it's illegal to drive a vehicle with
    earphones in both ears.

    And now I'll STFU.

    --ag
     
  15. Marz

    Marz Guest

    andy gee wrote:
    > "Gooserider" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > That's because a certain poster leapt at the opportunity to become the
    > > safety nanny for the newsgroup. Why people can't just STFU and mind
    > > their own business is beyond me.

    >
    > I didn't get involved in the flame war, didn't even read it, but
    > speaking of safety nannies, I have an observation:
    >
    > The other day I was riding down my local greenway. I was gaining on a
    > rider and was contemplating passing. From behind, she looked properly
    > kitted out and looked like a responsible rider, so I called out "passing
    > left" and made my move. In one of those moments of inevitability, she
    > apparently hadn't heard me and picked that moment to swing out to the
    > left a little, possibly to avoid something on the ground, but adding a
    > lot of anxiety to my pass. When I got a closer look, there, camoflogued
    > by the helmet straps, were those tiny i-pod earphones. Had I been aware
    > that she had earphones in, I definitely would have done the pass
    > differently.
    >
    > This isn't just nitpicking and nannyism. She put us both at risk,
    > myself unaware. In New York, it's illegal to drive a vehicle with
    > earphones in both ears.
    >
    > And now I'll STFU.
    >
    > --ag


    I like that. You enter someone else's personal space and because they
    are unaware of you they get the blame for putting everyone at risk, you
    donut! Please go back and learn how to ride a bike. The whole point of
    'passing left' or a bell is to alert someone of your presence, if you
    get no acknowledgement then it's likely you weren't heard or understood
    and so the ownership of risk is still with you.

    When you indicate to change lanes on the highway do you just indicate,
    assume that everyone saw you indicate and change lanes or do indicate,
    showing intent to move, check if it's clear or that someone is giving
    you space and then change lanes.

    Laters,

    Marz
     
  16. Scott L

    Scott L Guest

    Gooserider wrote:
    > "Bill Baka" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>You guys amaze me.
    >>Some of you, at least.
    >>I posted a pointer to an article that was written about the possibility of
    >>I-Pods damaging a persons hearing, and it turned into a flame war.
    >>Chill, ride, summer is coming.
    >>Bill Baka

    >
    >
    > That's because a certain poster leapt at the opportunity to become the
    > safety nanny for the newsgroup. Why people can't just STFU and mind their
    > own business is beyond me.


    Thank you for pegging my irony meter.


    Scott
     
  17. Scott L

    Scott L Guest

    andy gee wrote:
    > "Gooserider" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >
    >>That's because a certain poster leapt at the opportunity to become the
    >>safety nanny for the newsgroup. Why people can't just STFU and mind
    >>their own business is beyond me.

    >
    >
    > I didn't get involved in the flame war, didn't even read it, but
    > speaking of safety nannies, I have an observation:
    >
    > The other day I was riding down my local greenway. I was gaining on a
    > rider and was contemplating passing. From behind, she looked properly
    > kitted out and looked like a responsible rider, so I called out "passing
    > left" and made my move. In one of those moments of inevitability, she
    > apparently hadn't heard me and picked that moment to swing out to the
    > left a little, possibly to avoid something on the ground, but adding a
    > lot of anxiety to my pass. When I got a closer look, there, camoflogued
    > by the helmet straps, were those tiny i-pod earphones. Had I been aware
    > that she had earphones in, I definitely would have done the pass
    > differently.


    Yes, this is my chief complaint as well. Often you
    can't tell if a person is podding until it's too late.
    At least with headphones there is a visual clue when
    passing that they might not hear you.

    When I call passing on your left on the MUP I use on
    the ride home, the people who don't react inevitably
    are wearing earbuds. That's fine if they don't do
    something unusual. But if they are going to move in
    an unexpected manner, I hope they're looking first,
    because they sure aren't hearing.

    Scott
     
  18. Raoul Duke

    Raoul Duke Guest

    "dgk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    >I rarely listen to music
    > though, most of the time I have talk radio on. Usually Air America or
    > Pacifica, that way I can actually learn something.


    Yeah, Jerry Springer is a fountain of knowledge. ;^)
     
  19. Dane Buson

    Dane Buson Guest

    dgk <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > I listen to radio as I commute. I'm biking for over an hour each way,
    > do you really expect me to waste that time? I rarely listen to music
    > though, most of the time I have talk radio on. Usually Air America or
    > Pacifica, that way I can actually learn something.
    >
    > Sometimes I listen to lectures or webcasts. I never have the volume
    > high enough to intefere with hearing what's around me. In the summer I
    > drive with the windows closed and music on. I can't hear a thing that
    > occurs around the car.


    Out of curiousity, how fast are you going? I can listen to (most) music
    when I'm cycling [1], but there's far too much wind noise for me to listen
    to any kind of talk radio.

    > Just keep alert, that's the idea.
    >
    > Was there a huge debate when radios were first being installed in
    > cars?


    Maybe not, but then drinking and driving was not considered a problem in
    the same time period (if I'm not recalling incorrectly).

    [1] With a single earbud (as is legal in WA state), on the rare
    occasion when I'm taking a long ride home in low traffic situations.

    --
    Dane Buson - [email protected]
    "Cooperate with the inevitable means 'Roll with the punch',
    it does not mean stooling for the guards." -Lazarus Long
     
  20. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    :: Gooserider wrote:
    ::: "jb" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    ::: news:D[email protected]
    :::: Jogging or bicycling with headphones on is inherently dangerous.
    :::
    ::: So is LIFE. Hell, so is bicycling in traffic. Why don't you just
    ::: stay home under the covers?
    ::
    :: Bed rest is quite dangerous too.
    ::
    :: But then the odds of living to 100 years are quite small.

    Passive smoke, too, yet people are still allow to smoke in public places and
    subject others to their vile smoke.
     
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