I REALLY need help!

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by James Godley, Feb 4, 2003.

  1. James Godley

    James Godley New Member

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    I dunno how, but I've been coerced into cycling round a lake in Sweden. Mid june is when it'll happen, 20,000 other cyclists will be there too. The route is 300kms, and we're looking to do it in under 12hours!!
    I've cycled all my life, and have a good residual sort of fitness, but I've never done this sort of thing, 50 - 60kms an week is what I'm used to! What sort of training should I think about, and what do I eat the day before and during the race.
     
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  2. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    You should aim for a healthy diet, high (~ 55+ %) in starchy carbodyrates (e.g., pasta, rice, potatoes, bread, etc), with moderate amounts of protein, and fat. Try to avoid 'bad' fats such as animal (saturated) fats, and eat plenty of fruit and veggies as well. Basically, the same as a normal healthy diet, but increased volume to cope with the training. you should do eat this type of diet all the time, and in the week before the event, increase your carbohydrate intake, while reducing the total volume of training, to fully maximise your body's carbohydrate stores (i.e., liver and muscle glycogen).

    The training that you'll need to do will be dependent upon the time you have available, the exact nature of the event, what you want to get from it, etc.

    You'll have to increase your average weekly volume if you want to get round the event without collapsing or feeling ill!

    Please feel free to contact me,
    Ric
     
  3. Duckwah

    Duckwah New Member

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    you should have enough time to develop your fitness before june but you will definitely need a structured plan with increasing volume to make it through 300km.

    personally i would be looking at a plan that is periodised throughout the week on a scheme of high-low-medium-rest days and superimposed on that is increasing volume.

    so for example in the first few weeks

    Day 1. 40-60 min at a high intensity for example 80-90% of MHR
    Day 2. 30 min at low intensity for example 50-60% of MHR
    Day 3. 45 min at medium intensity for example 65-75% MHR
    Day 4. Rest

    repeat 4 day cycle and every week or so add time to you rides until you are able to do a couple of hours at around 75% of MHR.

    After a few weeks its probably also a good idea to include some longer rides at low intensities just to get used to being on the bike for long times. Remember to take plenty of water and have some energy bars or food so that you don't bonk after an hour or two.

    The other traditional way of getting into shape for a big ride is to do lots of long rides at low intensity like the pros do in the pre season. This is probably a good idea but i don't know many non pros who have 3-4 hours a day to ride around at 60% MHR for weeks on end and personally the boredom would drive me nuts.

    Anyway thats my 2 cents worth, i'm sure other people here will have other useful ideas and as always there are many ways to skin a cat.
     
  4. James Godley

    James Godley New Member

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    Thanks guys! This is precisely the sort of stuff I need to know..!
     
  5. Vo2

    Vo2 Member

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    I agree with ric and duckwha. TITS is what you need! (Time In The Saddle). 300 k's or 12 hrs on a bike will take it's toll, so make sure you are used to long hrs on the bike. Also, apart from those anorexic skeletons parading around the catwalk on Fashion TV calling themselves "supermodels", I don't think I know of anyone willingly able to go without food for 12 hrs and not become dysfunctional as a result, especially on a bike. Don't neglect your energy intake during the journey. Make sure you plan your meals properly.

    Good luck! Sounds like fun.
     
  6. Duckwah

    Duckwah New Member

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    12hrs is not too bad but after 6 days no food gets a bit rough:eek:

    but if you have the option definitely take plenty of food with you. Probably a good idea to try and figure out how many calories you will consume in 12 hrs of riding before you go and make sure you can carry enough.

    Nothing worse than bonking an hour from the finish
     
  7. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

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    Don't forget the water.
     
  8. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    Just to add to 2Lap's comment -- fluid intake is critical, especially in such a long event -- but it would be better to use a proper sports drink, that contains electrolytes to help prevent hyponatraemia.

    Ric
     
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