I ride different bicycles for cross training?

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Dave Is Here, Jan 22, 2003.

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  1. Dave Is Here

    Dave Is Here Guest

    I figure that most of what I do with bicycle riding is for personal conditioning. I ride with
    friends, ride solo, enter an occaisional race, commute, sometimes off road but mainly "on road". My
    favorite type of bicycle isn't the recumbent but a very simple road bike frame with the shifters,
    derailleurs and freewheel removed. The rear hub has a screwed on sprocket and when the wheel turns
    the crank turns in proportion. You'd think that this would tire the legs out a lot faster but in
    truth it doesn't. I think keeping the legs moving helps to keep the lactic acid flushed out. You
    don't have to accelerate your legs from a coast, you just go. The "fixed gear" bike has a gear that
    is big enough to keep me comfortable going down the road and tall enough to make me stand on the
    hills. I know several others that participate in this list ride similar bikes.

    Here are pictures of my fixie: http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu001.jpg
    http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu002.jpg http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu003.jpg

    I got a recumbent in 2001 mainly to give myself some conditioning that involved different pressure
    points and to use different muscle groups. I find that I enjoy riding a recumbent although I miss
    "standing" on the up-hills.

    I have a plan to ride 10,000 miles and get 50 centuries during 03. What's your cycling like?

    Dave
     
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  2. Dave Is Here

    Dave Is Here Guest

    I figure that most of what I do with bicycle riding is for personal conditioning. I ride with
    friends, ride solo, enter an occaisional race, commute, sometimes off road but mainly "on road". My
    favorite type of bicycle isn't the recumbent but a very simple road bike frame with the shifters,
    derailleurs and freewheel removed. The rear hub has a screwed on sprocket and when the wheel turns
    the crank turns in proportion. You'd think that this would tire the legs out a lot faster but in
    truth it doesn't. I think keeping the legs moving helps to keep the lactic acid flushed out. You
    don't have to accelerate your legs from a coast, you just go. The "fixed gear" bike has a gear that
    is big enough to keep me comfortable going down the road and tall enough to make me stand on the
    hills. I know several others that participate in this list ride similar bikes.

    Here are pictures of my fixie: http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu001.jpg
    http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu002.jpg http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu003.jpg

    I got a recumbent in 2001 mainly to give myself some conditioning that involved different pressure
    points and to use different muscle groups. I find that I enjoy riding a recumbent although I miss
    "standing" on the up-hills.

    I have a plan to ride 10,000 miles and get 50 centuries during 03. What's your cycling like?

    Dave
     
  3. Mlb

    Mlb Guest

    I kept my mb with the intention of cross training with it when I got my first bent. Three years
    later it's still hanging in my garage. Once I stopped riding it full time, my butt couldn't take it
    part time. The comfort factor difference is just too great for me.
     
  4. Mlb

    Mlb Guest

    I kept my mb with the intention of cross training with it when I got my first bent. Three years
    later it's still hanging in my garage. Once I stopped riding it full time, my butt couldn't take it
    part time. The comfort factor difference is just too great for me.
     
  5. Al Kubeluis

    Al Kubeluis Guest

    Dave, Thanks for fixed gear bike info. I'm impressed that you do centuries on
    it.I'm thinking of a weenie fixed wheel bike: keep bent in one gear and no coasting. My mileage past
    3 years, all bent, has been 5,000 - 6,000 per year with a handful of organized centuries each
    year and weekly rides in 40-100 mile range. Hilly rides are fun, challenging, and great training.
    Interval training is a weekly goal. Heart rate monitor I use for running and biking mostly - but
    also for kayaking, swimming, yoga, and strength building - provides very useful feedback.
    Comparison of current metrics and metrics from National Institutes for Health study I
    participated in as a marathon runner 20 years ago have been useful also. Basically, it pays to
    keep records as they provide data regarding what helps and hurts you. In my case, any hiatus in
    vigorous exercise, and usually accompanied by weight gain, was bad.
    --
    Al Kubeluis ~ Bacchetta Corsa ~ Maryland ~ USA ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ "dave is here"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I figure that most of what I do with bicycle riding is for personal conditioning. I ride with
    > friends, ride solo, enter an occaisional race, commute, sometimes off road but mainly "on
    > road". My favorite type of bicycle isn't the recumbent but a very simple road bike frame with
    > the shifters, derailleurs and freewheel removed. The rear hub has a screwed on sprocket and
    > when the wheel turns the crank turns in proportion. You'd think that this would tire the legs
    > out a lot faster but in truth it doesn't. I think keeping the legs moving helps to keep the
    > lactic acid flushed out. You don't have to accelerate your legs from a coast, you just go. The
    > "fixed gear" bike has a gear that is big enough to keep me comfortable going down the road and
    > tall enough to make me stand on the hills. I know several others that participate in this list
    > ride similar bikes.
    >
    > Here are pictures of my fixie: http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu001.jpg
    > http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu002.jpg http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu003.jpg
    >
    > I got a recumbent in 2001 mainly to give myself some conditioning that involved different pressure
    > points and to use different muscle groups. I find that I enjoy riding a recumbent although I miss
    > "standing" on the up-hills.
    >
    > I have a plan to ride 10,000 miles and get 50 centuries during 03. What's your cycling like?
    >
    > Dave
     
  6. Al Kubeluis

    Al Kubeluis Guest

    Dave, Thanks for fixed gear bike info. I'm impressed that you do centuries on
    it.I'm thinking of a weenie fixed wheel bike: keep bent in one gear and no coasting. My mileage past
    3 years, all bent, has been 5,000 - 6,000 per year with a handful of organized centuries each
    year and weekly rides in 40-100 mile range. Hilly rides are fun, challenging, and great training.
    Interval training is a weekly goal. Heart rate monitor I use for running and biking mostly - but
    also for kayaking, swimming, yoga, and strength building - provides very useful feedback.
    Comparison of current metrics and metrics from National Institutes for Health study I
    participated in as a marathon runner 20 years ago have been useful also. Basically, it pays to
    keep records as they provide data regarding what helps and hurts you. In my case, any hiatus in
    vigorous exercise, and usually accompanied by weight gain, was bad.
    --
    Al Kubeluis ~ Bacchetta Corsa ~ Maryland ~ USA ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ "dave is here"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I figure that most of what I do with bicycle riding is for personal conditioning. I ride with
    > friends, ride solo, enter an occaisional race, commute, sometimes off road but mainly "on
    > road". My favorite type of bicycle isn't the recumbent but a very simple road bike frame with
    > the shifters, derailleurs and freewheel removed. The rear hub has a screwed on sprocket and
    > when the wheel turns the crank turns in proportion. You'd think that this would tire the legs
    > out a lot faster but in truth it doesn't. I think keeping the legs moving helps to keep the
    > lactic acid flushed out. You don't have to accelerate your legs from a coast, you just go. The
    > "fixed gear" bike has a gear that is big enough to keep me comfortable going down the road and
    > tall enough to make me stand on the hills. I know several others that participate in this list
    > ride similar bikes.
    >
    > Here are pictures of my fixie: http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu001.jpg
    > http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu002.jpg http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu003.jpg
    >
    > I got a recumbent in 2001 mainly to give myself some conditioning that involved different pressure
    > points and to use different muscle groups. I find that I enjoy riding a recumbent although I miss
    > "standing" on the up-hills.
    >
    > I have a plan to ride 10,000 miles and get 50 centuries during 03. What's your cycling like?
    >
    > Dave
     
  7. Thats a great bike you have there, Dave. (although the frame is too big for you) :)

    I have a single speed bike also, which I used to ride with a fixed gear but changed to a freewheel
    last year, mainly so that I can coast the occasional downhill.

    The simplicity of a single speed makes it_so_ quiet to ride.

    Lewis.

    http://home.earthlink.net/~limeylew/index.html

    ...............

    [email protected] (dave is here) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I figure that most of what I do with bicycle riding is for personal conditioning. I ride with
    > friends, ride solo, enter an occaisional race, commute, sometimes off road but mainly "on
    > road". My favorite type of bicycle isn't the recumbent but a very simple road bike frame with
    > the shifters, derailleurs and freewheel removed. The rear hub has a screwed on sprocket and
    > when the wheel turns the crank turns in proportion. You'd think that this would tire the legs
    > out a lot faster but in truth it doesn't. I think keeping the legs moving helps to keep the
    > lactic acid flushed out. You don't have to accelerate your legs from a coast, you just go. The
    > "fixed gear" bike has a gear that is big enough to keep me comfortable going down the road and
    > tall enough to make me stand on the hills. I know several others that participate in this list
    > ride similar bikes.
    >
    > Here are pictures of my fixie: http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu001.jpg
    > http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu002.jpg http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu003.jpg
    >
    > I got a recumbent in 2001 mainly to give myself some conditioning that involved different pressure
    > points and to use different muscle groups. I find that I enjoy riding a recumbent although I miss
    > "standing" on the up-hills.
    >
    > I have a plan to ride 10,000 miles and get 50 centuries during 03. What's your cycling like?
    >
    > Dave
     
  8. On Wed, 15 Jan 2003, dave is here wrote:

    > I know several others that participate in this list ride similar bikes.

    Yep.

    > I have a plan to ride 10,000 miles and get 50 centuries during 03. What's your cycling like?

    I ride a bit more.

    Kent Peterson Issaquah WA USA http://www.halcyon.com/peterson/rando.html
     
  9. On Thu, 16 Jan 2003, Al Kubeluis wrote:

    > Dave, Thanks for fixed gear bike info. I'm impressed that you do centuries on
    > it.

    There are various people who do brevets (200-1400 km rides) on fixies. Last year Robert Gray rode
    the Canadian Rocky Mountain 1200 on his fixed, flipped over to the freewheel, rode cross country,
    flipped back to fixed and then rode Boston-Montreal-Boston.

    Kent Peterson Issaquah WA USA http://www.halcyon.com/peterson/rando.html
     
  10. Thats a great bike you have there, Dave. (although the frame is too big for you) :)

    I have a single speed bike also, which I used to ride with a fixed gear but changed to a freewheel
    last year, mainly so that I can coast the occasional downhill.

    The simplicity of a single speed makes it_so_ quiet to ride.

    Lewis.

    http://home.earthlink.net/~limeylew/index.html

    ...............

    [email protected] (dave is here) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I figure that most of what I do with bicycle riding is for personal conditioning. I ride with
    > friends, ride solo, enter an occaisional race, commute, sometimes off road but mainly "on
    > road". My favorite type of bicycle isn't the recumbent but a very simple road bike frame with
    > the shifters, derailleurs and freewheel removed. The rear hub has a screwed on sprocket and
    > when the wheel turns the crank turns in proportion. You'd think that this would tire the legs
    > out a lot faster but in truth it doesn't. I think keeping the legs moving helps to keep the
    > lactic acid flushed out. You don't have to accelerate your legs from a coast, you just go. The
    > "fixed gear" bike has a gear that is big enough to keep me comfortable going down the road and
    > tall enough to make me stand on the hills. I know several others that participate in this list
    > ride similar bikes.
    >
    > Here are pictures of my fixie: http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu001.jpg
    > http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu002.jpg http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu003.jpg
    >
    > I got a recumbent in 2001 mainly to give myself some conditioning that involved different pressure
    > points and to use different muscle groups. I find that I enjoy riding a recumbent although I miss
    > "standing" on the up-hills.
    >
    > I have a plan to ride 10,000 miles and get 50 centuries during 03. What's your cycling like?
    >
    > Dave
     
  11. On Wed, 15 Jan 2003, dave is here wrote:

    > I know several others that participate in this list ride similar bikes.

    Yep.

    > I have a plan to ride 10,000 miles and get 50 centuries during 03. What's your cycling like?

    I ride a bit more.

    Kent Peterson Issaquah WA USA http://www.halcyon.com/peterson/rando.html
     
  12. On Thu, 16 Jan 2003, Al Kubeluis wrote:

    > Dave, Thanks for fixed gear bike info. I'm impressed that you do centuries on
    > it.

    There are various people who do brevets (200-1400 km rides) on fixies. Last year Robert Gray rode
    the Canadian Rocky Mountain 1200 on his fixed, flipped over to the freewheel, rode cross country,
    flipped back to fixed and then rode Boston-Montreal-Boston.

    Kent Peterson Issaquah WA USA http://www.halcyon.com/peterson/rando.html
     
  13. Lewis, I was also wondering about the frame size given that Dave and I are about the same size
    x-seam and inseam. I ride a 55mm frame df. The fixie looks as if it is 60mm or better. Dave, You
    could be living dangerously. I rode a track bike, a Nishiki for training....20 or so years ago. I
    still get some interest in fixies from local riders. I'm currently looking for a 56mm frame with
    horizontial dropouts.

    Jude....///Bacchetta AERO St. Michaels and Tilghman Island.. Maryland Wheel Doctor Cycle and Sports,
    Inc 1-800-586-6645 "Lewis Campbell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Thats a great bike you have there, Dave. (although the frame is too big for you) :)
    >
    > I have a single speed bike also, which I used to ride with a fixed gear but changed to a freewheel
    > last year, mainly so that I can coast the occasional downhill.
    >
    > The simplicity of a single speed makes it_so_ quiet to ride.
    >
    > Lewis.
    >
    > http://home.earthlink.net/~limeylew/index.html
    >
    > ...............
    >
    > [email protected] (dave is here) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I figure that most of what I do with bicycle riding is for personal conditioning. I ride with
    > > friends, ride solo, enter an occaisional race, commute, sometimes off road but mainly "on road".
    > > My favorite type of bicycle isn't the recumbent but a very simple road bike frame with the
    > > shifters, derailleurs and freewheel removed. The rear hub has a screwed on sprocket and when the
    > > wheel turns the crank turns in proportion. You'd think that this would tire the legs out a lot
    > > faster but in truth it doesn't. I think keeping the legs moving helps to keep the lactic acid
    > > flushed out. You don't have to accelerate your legs from a coast, you just go. The "fixed gear"
    > > bike has a gear that is big enough to keep me comfortable going down the road and tall enough to
    > > make me stand on the hills. I know several others that participate in this list ride similar
    > > bikes.
    > >
    > > Here are pictures of my fixie: http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu001.jpg
    > > http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu002.jpg http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu003.jpg
    > >
    > > I got a recumbent in 2001 mainly to give myself some conditioning that involved different
    > > pressure points and to use different muscle groups. I find that I enjoy riding a recumbent
    > > although I miss "standing" on the up-hills.
    > >
    > > I have a plan to ride 10,000 miles and get 50 centuries during 03. What's your cycling like?
    > >
    > > Dave
     
  14. Lewis, I was also wondering about the frame size given that Dave and I are about the same size
    x-seam and inseam. I ride a 55mm frame df. The fixie looks as if it is 60mm or better. Dave, You
    could be living dangerously. I rode a track bike, a Nishiki for training....20 or so years ago. I
    still get some interest in fixies from local riders. I'm currently looking for a 56mm frame with
    horizontial dropouts.

    Jude....///Bacchetta AERO St. Michaels and Tilghman Island.. Maryland Wheel Doctor Cycle and Sports,
    Inc 1-800-586-6645 "Lewis Campbell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Thats a great bike you have there, Dave. (although the frame is too big for you) :)
    >
    > I have a single speed bike also, which I used to ride with a fixed gear but changed to a freewheel
    > last year, mainly so that I can coast the occasional downhill.
    >
    > The simplicity of a single speed makes it_so_ quiet to ride.
    >
    > Lewis.
    >
    > http://home.earthlink.net/~limeylew/index.html
    >
    > ...............
    >
    > [email protected] (dave is here) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I figure that most of what I do with bicycle riding is for personal conditioning. I ride with
    > > friends, ride solo, enter an occaisional race, commute, sometimes off road but mainly "on road".
    > > My favorite type of bicycle isn't the recumbent but a very simple road bike frame with the
    > > shifters, derailleurs and freewheel removed. The rear hub has a screwed on sprocket and when the
    > > wheel turns the crank turns in proportion. You'd think that this would tire the legs out a lot
    > > faster but in truth it doesn't. I think keeping the legs moving helps to keep the lactic acid
    > > flushed out. You don't have to accelerate your legs from a coast, you just go. The "fixed gear"
    > > bike has a gear that is big enough to keep me comfortable going down the road and tall enough to
    > > make me stand on the hills. I know several others that participate in this list ride similar
    > > bikes.
    > >
    > > Here are pictures of my fixie: http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu001.jpg
    > > http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu002.jpg http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu003.jpg
    > >
    > > I got a recumbent in 2001 mainly to give myself some conditioning that involved different
    > > pressure points and to use different muscle groups. I find that I enjoy riding a recumbent
    > > although I miss "standing" on the up-hills.
    > >
    > > I have a plan to ride 10,000 miles and get 50 centuries during 03. What's your cycling like?
    > >
    > > Dave
     
  15. Gary Mc

    Gary Mc Guest

    Mike,

    That is me. My Specialized Rockhopper is in the basement collecting dust since I bought a recumbent.
    When I went from 2 wheels to 3 wheels, my son took over the Stratus. I only ride a trike. I am a bit
    slower on it, but it will climb like nothing that I have ever ridden. Other than off road, there is
    not many times that I would not prefer to be on the trike.

    For cross training I am trying to get back into running this winter. So far so good, but these aging
    knees still making running a wait and see thing.

    Gary McCarty, Greenspeed GTO, 57 year old runner's knees, Salt Lake City

    MLB <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > >
    >
    > I kept my mb with the intention of cross training with it when I got my first bent. Three years
    > later it's still hanging in my garage. Once I stopped riding it full time, my butt couldn't take
    > it part time. The comfort factor difference is just too great for me.
     
  16. Stratrider

    Stratrider Guest

    MLB, I share your experience. I had the drive train of my mtn bike rebuilt. I was going to continue
    to ride both my Stratus and my mtn bike..... I haven't touched the mtn bike in at least two
    years..... The best laid plans.....

    Jim Reilly Reading, PA
     
  17. Gary Mc

    Gary Mc Guest

    Mike,

    That is me. My Specialized Rockhopper is in the basement collecting dust since I bought a recumbent.
    When I went from 2 wheels to 3 wheels, my son took over the Stratus. I only ride a trike. I am a bit
    slower on it, but it will climb like nothing that I have ever ridden. Other than off road, there is
    not many times that I would not prefer to be on the trike.

    For cross training I am trying to get back into running this winter. So far so good, but these aging
    knees still making running a wait and see thing.

    Gary McCarty, Greenspeed GTO, 57 year old runner's knees, Salt Lake City

    MLB <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > >
    >
    > I kept my mb with the intention of cross training with it when I got my first bent. Three years
    > later it's still hanging in my garage. Once I stopped riding it full time, my butt couldn't take
    > it part time. The comfort factor difference is just too great for me.
     
  18. Stratrider

    Stratrider Guest

    MLB, I share your experience. I had the drive train of my mtn bike rebuilt. I was going to continue
    to ride both my Stratus and my mtn bike..... I haven't touched the mtn bike in at least two
    years..... The best laid plans.....

    Jim Reilly Reading, PA
     
  19. Dave Is Here

    Dave Is Here Guest

    Hi Lew and Jude The fixed gear has a 63cm seat post. I can't stand over it with it upright, I have
    to lean it over a bit. It does position the bars nice for a fixed gear though. Aero is not the hot
    setup on the downhills. I don't ride it with my feet on the ground however. The top tube is the same
    as on my 56cm trek hence the good fit. It is very quiet and climbs hills like a billy goat. Makes my
    bents seem positively sluggish. The frame is from a junk pile. It is an old Centurian and weighs
    only 20 pounds including pedals and bikebag. I built the wheels myself on this one.

    I have seen your posts Lew on the framebuilders list.

    Thanks for the concern about high top tube. Dave

    . [email protected] (Lewis Campbell) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Thats a great bike you have there, Dave. (although the frame is too big for you) :)
    >
    > I have a single speed bike also, which I used to ride with a fixed gear but changed to a freewheel
    > last year, mainly so that I can coast the occasional downhill.
    >
    > The simplicity of a single speed makes it_so_ quiet to ride.
    >
    > Lewis.
    >
    > http://home.earthlink.net/~limeylew/index.html
    >
    > ...............
    >
    > [email protected] (dave is here) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I figure that most of what I do with bicycle riding is for personal conditioning. I ride with
    > > friends, ride solo, enter an occaisional race, commute, sometimes off road but mainly "on road".
    > > My favorite type of bicycle isn't the recumbent but a very simple road bike frame with the
    > > shifters, derailleurs and freewheel removed. The rear hub has a screwed on sprocket and when the
    > > wheel turns the crank turns in proportion. You'd think that this would tire the legs out a lot
    > > faster but in truth it doesn't. I think keeping the legs moving helps to keep the lactic acid
    > > flushed out. You don't have to accelerate your legs from a coast, you just go. The "fixed gear"
    > > bike has a gear that is big enough to keep me comfortable going down the road and tall enough to
    > > make me stand on the hills. I know several others that participate in this list ride similar
    > > bikes.
    > >
    > > Here are pictures of my fixie: http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu001.jpg
    > > http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu002.jpg http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu003.jpg
    > >
    > > I got a recumbent in 2001 mainly to give myself some conditioning that involved different
    > > pressure points and to use different muscle groups. I find that I enjoy riding a recumbent
    > > although I miss "standing" on the up-hills.
    > >
    > > I have a plan to ride 10,000 miles and get 50 centuries during 03. What's your cycling like?
    > >
    > > Dave
     
  20. Dave Is Here

    Dave Is Here Guest

    Hi Lew and Jude The fixed gear has a 63cm seat post. I can't stand over it with it upright, I have
    to lean it over a bit. It does position the bars nice for a fixed gear though. Aero is not the hot
    setup on the downhills. I don't ride it with my feet on the ground however. The top tube is the same
    as on my 56cm trek hence the good fit. It is very quiet and climbs hills like a billy goat. Makes my
    bents seem positively sluggish. The frame is from a junk pile. It is an old Centurian and weighs
    only 20 pounds including pedals and bikebag. I built the wheels myself on this one.

    I have seen your posts Lew on the framebuilders list.

    Thanks for the concern about high top tube. Dave

    . [email protected] (Lewis Campbell) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Thats a great bike you have there, Dave. (although the frame is too big for you) :)
    >
    > I have a single speed bike also, which I used to ride with a fixed gear but changed to a freewheel
    > last year, mainly so that I can coast the occasional downhill.
    >
    > The simplicity of a single speed makes it_so_ quiet to ride.
    >
    > Lewis.
    >
    > http://home.earthlink.net/~limeylew/index.html
    >
    > ...............
    >
    > [email protected] (dave is here) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I figure that most of what I do with bicycle riding is for personal conditioning. I ride with
    > > friends, ride solo, enter an occaisional race, commute, sometimes off road but mainly "on road".
    > > My favorite type of bicycle isn't the recumbent but a very simple road bike frame with the
    > > shifters, derailleurs and freewheel removed. The rear hub has a screwed on sprocket and when the
    > > wheel turns the crank turns in proportion. You'd think that this would tire the legs out a lot
    > > faster but in truth it doesn't. I think keeping the legs moving helps to keep the lactic acid
    > > flushed out. You don't have to accelerate your legs from a coast, you just go. The "fixed gear"
    > > bike has a gear that is big enough to keep me comfortable going down the road and tall enough to
    > > make me stand on the hills. I know several others that participate in this list ride similar
    > > bikes.
    > >
    > > Here are pictures of my fixie: http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu001.jpg
    > > http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu002.jpg http://www.doctorvision.com/fixie/centu003.jpg
    > >
    > > I got a recumbent in 2001 mainly to give myself some conditioning that involved different
    > > pressure points and to use different muscle groups. I find that I enjoy riding a recumbent
    > > although I miss "standing" on the up-hills.
    > >
    > > I have a plan to ride 10,000 miles and get 50 centuries during 03. What's your cycling like?
    > >
    > > Dave
     
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