I think I killed my bike!



davek

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Jan 22, 2004
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I was out for a ride earlier today and had a bit of a mishap. I somehow managed to overshift my rear derailleur into the wheel. Didn't spot any obvious damage so I just untangled it and got back on the road. But the derailleur must have got a bit bent or damaged in some way I didn't notice because a little bit further down the road it snagged on a spoke and jammed the wheel - fortunately I was going quite slow uphill at the time. When I had a closer look, I saw that not only was the derailleur completely bent out of shape to the point where it was almost doubled back on the hub, the dropout had bent almost to snapping point too. Fortunately, I managed to bend the derailleur and the dropout roughly back into their proper position. The wheel was buckled a bit, but not too badly, so I managed to ride it home - lucky because if I hadn't been able to it would have meant a ten mile walk - but I'm worried that the damage to the dropout could be terminal.

The only upside of this would be that I would have an excuse to buy a new bike... :)
 

less'go

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Sep 11, 2003
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My condolences, but are you sure you don't want to invest in getting your bike completely re-done instead of abandoning it coldheartedly?
 

davek

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Jan 22, 2004
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Originally posted by less'go
My condolences, but are you sure you don't want to invest in getting your bike completely re-done instead of abandoning it coldheartedly?
Well... it's an old bike. Nearly 20 years old, in fact. But it's still a good bike, perfectly suitable for the type of riding I do, and the frame is still going strong so in theory there's no reason why I can't just upgrade the components. I'm a bit concerned about the damage I've done to the dropout today though. I'll have to investigate getting that fixed - I fear that it might end up costing so much that a new bike would be the more sensible option. I won't abandon my trusty old steed but I wouldn't mind an excuse to buy myself a shiny new machine...
 

ccorrick

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Dec 9, 2003
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Go for the new glitter!! ;)

I'd agree with the costs to repair. It seems like a hard place to "fix" and I think I'd only trust a bike builder. So shipping, material, labor, and more shipping.... but you might want to check it out, maybe we'll be surprised.

A new one sure might be fun :p
 

cfsmtb

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Apr 11, 2003
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Originally posted by less'go
My condolences, but are you sure you don't want to invest in getting your bike completely re-done instead of abandoning it coldheartedly?

What's the frame? If steel, it can be repaired., don't discard your beloved pedally yet... :eek:
 

Hitchy

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Jan 26, 2004
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G'day,

If your frame is really 20 yeras old...go for the new bike. Bike technology has come as far in the last 10 years, as it did in the previous 90 years, (abit like computers). All this technology doesn't neccessarily cost the earth either....you will wonder why you didn't do it sooner, when you 1st ride something new (as against 20 years old!),besides who needs an excuse to buy a new bike!!!,

cheers,

Hitchy
 

davek

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Jan 22, 2004
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Originally posted by Hitchy
besides who needs an excuse to buy a new bike!!!

No-one, apart from my wife and my bank manager. I'm due a £400 tax rebate, which would be handy but I think my wife has already got that earmarked for other uses. :(

to cfsmtb: the frame is Reynolds 531, presume the dropouts are steel. I reckon it should be fixable.
 

systecsol

New Member
Nov 29, 2003
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It is the reliability and safety that would decide the repair/replace decision.
 

ewitz

New Member
Dec 11, 2003
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Bikes should be replaced on an annual basis. Quit being such a cheapskate. Not only should you be buying a new bike you should be buying the most expensive one that you can find. At full retail, as pennance for your tightfisted behaviour.
 

davek

New Member
Jan 22, 2004
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I love you guys. I'm off down the bike shop first thing tomorrow morning with a suitcase full of ready cash.
 

cfsmtb

New Member
Apr 11, 2003
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Originally posted by ewitz
Bikes should be replaced on an annual basis. Quit being such a cheapskate. Not only should you be buying a new bike you should be buying the most expensive one that you can find. At full retail, as pennance for your tightfisted behaviour.

LOL! Sweet dreams are made of this. :D
Not trying hard enough, total replacement every six months with full Trek team kit + bike, or failing that, upgrade every frame with Campy Chorus.
 

Kona_Blue

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Jan 19, 2004
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Originally posted by davek
I was out for a ride earlier today and had a bit of a mishap. I somehow managed to overshift my rear derailleur into the wheel. Didn't spot any obvious damage so I just untangled it and got back on the road. But the derailleur must have got a bit bent or damaged in some way I didn't notice because a little bit further down the road it snagged on a spoke and jammed the wheel - fortunately I was going quite slow uphill at the time. When I had a closer look, I saw that not only was the derailleur completely bent out of shape to the point where it was almost doubled back on the hub, the dropout had bent almost to snapping point too. Fortunately, I managed to bend the derailleur and the dropout roughly back into their proper position. The wheel was buckled a bit, but not too badly, so I managed to ride it home - lucky because if I hadn't been able to it would have meant a ten mile walk - but I'm worried that the damage to the dropout could be terminal.

The only upside of this would be that I would have an excuse to buy a new bike... :)
 

Kona_Blue

New Member
Jan 19, 2004
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Originally posted by davek
I was out for a ride earlier today and had a bit of a mishap. I somehow managed to overshift my rear derailleur into the wheel. Didn't spot any obvious damage so I just untangled it and got back on the road. But the derailleur must have got a bit bent or damaged in some way I didn't notice because a little bit further down the road it snagged on a spoke and jammed the wheel - fortunately I was going quite slow uphill at the time. When I had a closer look, I saw that not only was the derailleur completely bent out of shape to the point where it was almost doubled back on the hub, the dropout had bent almost to snapping point too. Fortunately, I managed to bend the derailleur and the dropout roughly back into their proper position. The wheel was buckled a bit, but not too badly, so I managed to ride it home - lucky because if I hadn't been able to it would have meant a ten mile walk - but I'm worried that the damage to the dropout could be terminal.

The only upside of this would be that I would have an excuse to buy a new bike... :)

Late last year, I went to my local bike shop to get them to fit my fathers road racing bike to me. I was aked what I wanted to do with it and I replied racing. Fortunately, the frame size did not lend itself to fit me properly and as the technology has advance a great deal in 20 years, I was advised that "all things being equal" I would be unlikely to be competitive. I spent $2K and have now been riding my new bike since November. It was some of the best money I have ever spent. Less aches, more mileage and a much greater enjoyment of cycling. I did start racing and came 2nd in my first race. OK so it was E grade, but you have to start somewhere. being sentimental about a bike is OK, but things have come a long, long way.
\\'
 

BarSteward

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Jan 11, 2004
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These posts come at an interesting time. I'm about to come into a sum of money and I was seriously considering getting a bloke called Brian Rouke to build me £2.7k worth of bike. Two things stopped me. 1. Er' indoors. 2. I found it quite difficult to imagine myself buying such a serius bit of kit that most high grade amateurs would dream of. I thought I was being a tad pretentious. Besides, my existing bike does the job. No, should I break it, then that may be a different matter...... (I'm doing 170K a week on a turbo and 70k on sunday road ride)
 

Kona_Blue

New Member
Jan 19, 2004
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Originally posted by BarSteward
These posts come at an interesting time. I'm about to come into a sum of money and I was seriously considering getting a bloke called Brian Rouke to build me £2.7k worth of bike. Two things stopped me. 1. Er' indoors. 2. I found it quite difficult to imagine myself buying such a serius bit of kit that most high grade amateurs would dream of. I thought I was being a tad pretentious. Besides, my existing bike does the job. No, should I break it, then that may be a different matter...... (I'm doing 170K a week on a turbo and 70k on sunday road ride)

I probably do a little more K's than you, but only since I bought the new bike. It has really inspired me to get out there and ride. I thought it was going to be a hard sell to "Er' indoors" but that went well too when she saw the bike. Riding around the Olympic Stadium and surrounds helps too.
 

JuneBug

New Member
Dec 15, 2003
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Originally posted by davek

The only upside of this would be that I would have an excuse to buy a new bike... :)

Perhaps a single speed? haha. Just tell folks that you have such incredibly strong hammer strength that you broke the deralieur!!

A good riding pal of mine had that happen to him during a mountain bike ride. he somehow managed to remove the bent derailer and he took off some links on his chain and quickly ( and with amazing accuracy) turned his mountain bike into a single speed and rode on!!!!

:) moral. always carry a chain tool !