i walk the line

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by loki, Sep 25, 2004.

  1. loki

    loki Guest

    I dropped off my bike at the LBS on my to work the other night. Come the end
    of shift I decided to walk home. The ~15 minute bike commute isn't too much
    to walk and the weather at 6 am was a pleasantly cool mid-September
    morning.. It gave for a different perspective walking the same route I
    usually bike.

    Things I noticed in random musings:

    Wind matters. Although lately I've almost reach the point of upgrading my
    clothing from shorts and t's to something more substantial, when walking the
    lesser dress is quite sufficient given morning temps in the single digits C.

    I saw more bikes [including the no-light-wrong-way rider of York Rd I have
    seen previously]. I guessing when I'm on the bike we're all moving at the
    same speed and are thus less likely to pass each other.

    People are more likely to say hello in passing on foot than on bike. Makes
    sense I guess - a slower closure rate.

    Where the trail crosses the street I found myself automatically gauging the
    gaps in traffic based on my bike speed - not my foot speed.

    Nothing profound - just things that make Arsenio go 'Hmmmmmm'.

    --
    'Just because you're wearing a tie
    Doesn't mean you're bloody important'
    -chumbawamba
     
    Tags:


  2. "loki" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I dropped off my bike at the LBS on my to work the other night. Come the

    end
    > of shift I decided to walk home. The ~15 minute bike commute isn't too

    much
    > to walk and the weather at 6 am was a pleasantly cool mid-September
    > morning.. It gave for a different perspective walking the same route I
    > usually bike.


    I did something similar, about 8 months ago -- I didn't ride the bike to
    work but took the bus. I got off the bus at the freeway stop just before
    downtown and walked to work from there, just so I could have a little
    exercise. The walk duplicated about the same length as your walk back from
    the LBS.

    One of the things that really struck me was how I was oblivious to the
    decorations that they put on the posts when you enter Chinatown. I guess
    they are up higher than my eye level on the bike, and I have enough things
    to look out for when on the bike.

    You mention that more people greeted you on foot. I certainly got greeted
    more by panhandlers while on foot, but this a function of the neighborhood I
    was walking through. I also spotted even more debris by the side of the
    road -- usually all I am focused on is avoiding that which is directly in my
    direction of travel.

    Something else I recognized was how much more willing I was to stop while on
    foot. I walked by a bakery in Chinatown, and was much more willing to stop
    and see what they had, for example. I wonder how much better/more secure
    bicycle parking would make a difference in how likely people are to stop on
    their bicycles. I also wonder how different it is for cars willing to stop
    vs bicycles vs pedestrians, and if these sorts of things should go into the
    consideration of the design of urban shopping districts.


    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky
    please substitute yahoo for mousepotato to reply
    Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
    Personal page: http://www.geocities.com/cpetersky/
    See the books I've set free at: http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
     
  3. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Sat, 25 Sep 2004 14:57:42 GMT,
    <[email protected]>,
    "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote, in part:

    >Something else I recognized was how much more willing I was to stop while on
    >foot. I walked by a bakery in Chinatown, and was much more willing to stop
    >and see what they had, for example. I wonder how much better/more secure
    >bicycle parking would make a difference in how likely people are to stop on
    >their bicycles. I also wonder how different it is for cars willing to stop
    >vs bicycles vs pedestrians, and if these sorts of things should go into the
    >consideration of the design of urban shopping districts.


    We've seen the popularity of "drive-through" restaurants and services
    in areas where the pedestrian traffic couldn't support a business.
    Having sufficient volume of cars to sustain a "drive-through"
    operation precludes having an adequate pedestrian customer base. The
    scale and geometry is wrong for humans. These areas are places to be
    merely passed through. Nobody lives there. Civility diminishes in an
    inverse proportion to the amount of asphalt paving.

    I think if we look at the areas of a city that have lively pedestrian
    streets we'll see a whole different scale. The most popular areas are
    generally those established before the suburban sprawl phenomenon
    gutted the cities. They have narrower streets, fewer and slower moving
    motor vehicles. They're usually well served by public transit and are
    central to large population bases. Parking should be situated at the
    edges of these areas to protect the qualities which make them good
    places for people to walk.

    I think Jane Jacobs and Christopher Alexander have long ago done the
    research and identified the elements required for the successful
    pedestrian shopping districts that are essential for creating livable
    cities. Neither of them are huge fans of the impact car-culture has
    had on civilisation.

    Sidewalks in Vancouver's Chinatown are packed full of people and
    wares. There aren't many convenient or designated bicycle parking
    facilities in that neighbourhood. Parking meters and phoney poles are
    about all there is handy for locking a bike. But, I don't think that
    discourages anyone from riding there to do their shopping.
    --
    zk
     
  4. dreaded

    dreaded Guest

    "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "loki" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > I dropped off my bike at the LBS on my to work the other night. Come the

    > end
    > > of shift I decided to walk home. The ~15 minute bike commute isn't too

    > much
    > > to walk and the weather at 6 am was a pleasantly cool mid-September
    > > morning.. It gave for a different perspective walking the same route I
    > > usually bike.

    >
    > I did something similar, about 8 months ago -- I didn't ride the bike to
    > work but took the bus. I got off the bus at the freeway stop just before
    > downtown and walked to work from there, just so I could have a little
    > exercise. The walk duplicated about the same length as your walk back from
    > the LBS.
    >
    > One of the things that really struck me was how I was oblivious to the
    > decorations that they put on the posts when you enter Chinatown. I guess
    > they are up higher than my eye level on the bike, and I have enough things
    > to look out for when on the bike.
    >
    > You mention that more people greeted you on foot. I certainly got greeted
    > more by panhandlers while on foot, but this a function of the neighborhood

    I
    > was walking through. I also spotted even more debris by the side of the
    > road -- usually all I am focused on is avoiding that which is directly in

    my
    > direction of travel.
    >
    > Something else I recognized was how much more willing I was to stop while

    on
    > foot. I walked by a bakery in Chinatown, and was much more willing to stop
    > and see what they had, for example. I wonder how much better/more secure
    > bicycle parking would make a difference in how likely people are to stop

    on
    > their bicycles. I also wonder how different it is for cars willing to stop
    > vs bicycles vs pedestrians, and if these sorts of things should go into

    the
    > consideration of the design of urban shopping districts.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Warm Regards,
    >
    > Claire Petersky


    Claire, do you work downtown seattle? Have your used that new place where
    they watch your bike? i have a new class downtown and want to bike there but
    don't know where's the safest place to keep it.
    -alan
     
  5. Fritz M

    Fritz M Guest

    "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > I did something similar, about 8 months ago -- I didn't ride the bike to
    > work but took the bus.


    A couple of weeks ago my wife picked me up from work and both of my
    bikes ended up at the office. The next work day, I went to the bus
    stop but I missed the bus. Instead of waiting a half hour for the next
    bus, I walked the six miles to work.

    As others note, the observations one makes while walking are different
    from driving and even from cycling.

    RFM
     
  6. loki

    loki Guest

    "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    [...]
    > Something else I recognized was how much more willing I was to stop while

    on
    > foot. I walked by a bakery in Chinatown, and was much more willing to stop
    > and see what they had, for example. I wonder how much better/more secure
    > bicycle parking would make a difference in how likely people are to stop

    on
    > their bicycles.


    For me it's convenience. I wouldn't have a problem locking up - even a
    kryptonite :) - it's just the minor hassle of doing so that might make me
    not stop. That and I often like to go sans lock if I don't plan on needing
    it. It would reduce the spontaneous stops, I guess.

    --
    'Oh lord!
    Won't you buy me, a Mercedes Benz?
    My friends all drive Porsches as sung by:
    I must make amends.' -janis joplin
     
  7. loki

    loki Guest

    "Zoot Katz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    [...]
    > We've seen the popularity of "drive-through" restaurants and services
    > in areas where the pedestrian traffic couldn't support a business.
    > Having sufficient volume of cars to sustain a "drive-through"
    > operation precludes having an adequate pedestrian customer base. The
    > scale and geometry is wrong for humans. These areas are places to be
    > merely passed through. Nobody lives there. Civility diminishes in an
    > inverse proportion to the amount of asphalt paving.


    Although I love their product dearly; Tim Horton's has at least two stores
    in town that totally bugger up traffic. The one I am most familiar with is
    close to my work place. It's one property short of the intersection and the
    drive through makes the entire area congested mess during the morning and
    afternoon rush hours.

    --
    'Do as you damn well please
    Or you could end up
    being a pot-bellied boring hairless fart'
    - billy connelly
     
  8. "dreaded" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote in message


    > Claire, do you work downtown seattle?


    Yup.

    > Have your used that new place where
    > they watch your bike?


    The Bikestation? Well. I was there this morning, because my shifter cable
    broke, and they're open supposedly at 7:00 AM. It was 7:50 AM and the place
    was locked up tighter than a drum. I'd hate to rely on it if it's that
    unreliable. Flipside, the one other time I was in there, because I had
    forgotten my pump, the tech replaced my tube in 30 seconds -- all I wanted
    was access to his floor pump, but he did the whole operation for me in
    nothing flat.

    > i have a new class downtown and want to bike there but
    > don't know where's the safest place to keep it.


    Where and when's your class? Email me.


    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky
    please substitute yahoo for mousepotato to reply
    Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
    Personal page: http://www.geocities.com/cpetersky/
    See the books I've set free at: http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
     
  9. loki

    loki Guest

    "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:D[email protected]
    [...]
    > Flipside, the one other time I was in there, because I had
    > forgotten my pump, the tech replaced my tube in 30 seconds -- all I wanted
    > was access to his floor pump, but he did the whole operation for me in
    > nothing flat.

    ^^^

    So to speak.


    --
    'They stab it with their steely knives
    But they just can't kill the beast'
    -eagles
     
  10. Dane Jackson

    Dane Jackson Guest

    Claire Petersky <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Something else I recognized was how much more willing I was to stop while on
    > foot. I walked by a bakery in Chinatown, and was much more willing to stop
    > and see what they had, for example.


    Which one? Yum yum, My Favorite Cake House, The one near Eighth & King
    (Sweet & Fresh - I think), A Piece of Cake, Mon Hei, Cake House? My
    Favorite Cake House is definitely my favorite, their Mango tarts are
    fantastic (assuming you get them earlier in the day). What? Stop
    looking at me like that. No, I don't spend a lot of time perusing
    Chinese bakeries. You can't prove anything!

    > I wonder how much better/more secure
    > bicycle parking would make a difference in how likely people are to stop on
    > their bicycles. I also wonder how different it is for cars willing to stop
    > vs bicycles vs pedestrians, and if these sorts of things should go into the
    > consideration of the design of urban shopping districts.


    Eh, there are few enough other cyclists usually that there are plenty of
    poles or postal boxes to lock up to. Bike parking would be nice though.
    It is definitely easier to cycle down and pick up take-out than to drive.
    Parking in the ID is, of course, sparse and hotly contested. Plus my
    favorite takeout (Hing Loon) [1] is right next to my favorite bakery. [2]

    [1] They do a great Szechuan eggplant, and my daughter loves their green
    onion pancakes.
    [2] Which is also conviently just down the block from my favorite soup
    noodle place. Canton Wonton is a great hole in the wall.

    --
    Dane Jackson - z u v e m b i @ u n i x b i g o t s . o r g
    Thus spake the master programmer:
    "When you have learned to snatch the error code from
    the trap frame, it will be time for you to leave."
    -- Geoffrey James, "The Tao of Programming"
     
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