I want lighter!!!

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by braso, Jan 24, 2004.

  1. braso

    braso New Member

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    Hey all,
    Just after some feedback/ideas on how I should go about making my bike a bit lighter.

    I have an '02 Trek 5200 (The blue/carbon/red/white frame). It is equipped with Ultegra 9 spd except for the front derailleur, which is Dura-Ace. The seatpost, handlebars and stem are all standard Bontrager ones off a Trek 1500 (My old bike) The saddle is a standard Trek one. The wheelset is Bontrager Select front/Race rear.

    I love my frame, but I just want to make the bike a bit lighter. I am just wondering where the best place to start would be. Should I upgrade the wheelset, or start by getting a carbon seatpost, lighter stem and handlebars. Alternatively, should I start changing over the groupset to Dura-Ace 9spd? If so, which parts will save me the most weight???

    I am a bit of a noob at the whole cycling scene, I have only been cycling about 2 1/2 years, but I am doing over 300km's a week, so I am looking for every advantage I can get. I am not doing any racing, just a few bunch rides and training.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Cheers

    Shane
     
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  2. jstraw

    jstraw New Member

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    If I were you I'd begin my research at http://weightweenies.starbike.com/
     
  3. Rudy

    Rudy New Member

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    I don't know much about the Bontrager select wheelset but I would think that they're heavier than the X Lite.
    Taking some weihgts off the wheelset is one of the biggest improvements you can make to your bike. This is rotational weights and it'll help to make your bike rolls a little bit easier. I would start there first and you can probably shave 300 to 500 g off, depending on your budget of course. The rest is pretty much stationary weights so just go here.... and do some comparision of the weights to cost ratios...then start picking and chosing parts.

    http://weightweenies.starbike.com/listings.php
     
  4. Rudy

    Rudy New Member

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    a couple more thoughts...your BB is Ultegra so I might want to leave that alone...but look into the skewers...there are some cheap Ti skewers that can unload quite a bit of grams off your bike.
     
  5. Postie

    Postie New Member

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    Just to back up what Rudy is saying here; Since wheels involve rotational weight, the general rule for weight savings is: Each pound you save on your wheels translates to a ride that acts 4 pounds lighter. This is definitely the first place to start. No other one component will change your ride like new wheels.

    I'd have to say that, when it comes to weight savings per dollar, your drive train components (Ultegra to DA) should be the last place you want to upgrade.

    The rest is all about saving grams one component at a time.

    One thing to keep in mind though; I love a light bike as much as the next guy, and I love playing the game where you can say, "Your bike weighs 18 lbs? Mine is only 15.4!" (this, of course, is a conversation that happens in my dreams ;) ) However many full water bottles weigh 1.75 lbs. Keeping that in mind, the best weight savings may be to guzzle before you ride an leave with half full water bottles :D .
     
  6. Gary G

    Gary G New Member

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    Of course, once you drink that water, it's in you, and you're
    on the bike...it's a zero-sum game! :cool:

    GaryG
     
  7. mrowkoob

    mrowkoob New Member

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    A quick summary.

    Changing from 2001? Ultegra to Dura Ace 10 Speed about 400 grams.

    Changing just your ultegra brakes to Cat usa titanium brakes 240 grams. Or your new DA 10 speed brakes to cat 190 grams. There are some part titanium canecreek brakes that will save you 100 grams and are cheaper than cat usa brakes. An not to forget the are ultra expensive carbonbrakes that weigh 70 grams pr pair...


    Changing your stem,bar,post. to lightwiegt aluminium or carbon (some top end aluminium stuff is still lighter than carbon and cheaper) about a 150 -200 grams.

    Your standard wheelset is about 1900-2000 grams here you can really save weight and up performance in theory down to 990 grams. ( you can save almost a 1000 grams!) But take in consideration your own weight as those ultra light wheels often are sensitive to heavy riders and also they are not for a seasons training they are for racing use them in training and they wont last long. You can get more durable wheelsets at about 1500 grams thus saving you 350-500 grams depending on initial wheelset weight.

    Your standard bontrager saddle is around 290-300 grams. You can get an affordable Selle Italia SLR at 135 grams or Go lower to around 70 grams with more expensive all carbon saddles. Saving 180-230 grams.

    Tires (those rotationg grams) You can save 15-100 grams on the right tires depending on what you are using. Some TT tires weight down to 150 grams this ofcourse affects durability so again not something you use for those training miles. Saving 50-170 grams.

    Low weight cables like nokon saves you 40% of standard weight cables (new DA 10 excluded) 15-30 grams.

    Pedals standard 300 grams. You can buy them as low as 120 grams (the orb) 150 Crank Bros tripple ti and so on.
    saving 150-170 grams.

    So if money is no option you could save as much as about 2.2 kilos. But then agian if money was no option I would also buy a Scott CR1 team issue frame and save 400 grams on the frame compared to your "old" oclv.
    Also detalis like all nuts and bolkts can be replaced by carbon or titanium bolts. Chain, cassette, chainrings can be bought i aluminium and even carbon now for even more weightsaving but they are not very durable. Thsi could take another 400 grams off the bike upping it to 2.6 kg! approximately.

    The more affordable version would be Wheelset, saddle, and maybe brakes or pedals saving you around 800-900 grams.

    Except for the wheels this lightening of your bike makes no sense unless you are in such a great shape that you couldn´t afford to loose a few pounds yourself

    If you are not completely trimmed loosing a few pounds would be the cheapest weightsaving by far.
     
  8. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    mrowkoob, that's a great summary. I'll add that braso should weight his shoes also, since road shoe weights vary by 200 gms or more.

    But agree that this kind of lightening makes no sense . You'd spend thousands of dollars to gain benefits hard to measure on the road, and have a less-durable Trek 5200 when finished.
     
  9. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Wondering if braso has weighed hisself and has any extra baggage to shed? Most effective and cost efficient way I know of.Till that happens, throwing money at it is just rubbish.
     
  10. jstraw

    jstraw New Member

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    There is an intangible value to riding fancier/lighter gear than one's body or skill level may completely warrant. I know for me that it raises my enthusiasm, solidifies my commitment and inspires greater effort when it comes to riding. Having a bike I adore means having a bike I ride more often.
     
  11. mrowkoob

    mrowkoob New Member

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    Jstraw very true. I have one kitted so I have to weigh less than 185 pounds to ride it. It motivates me to keep my weight down. It´s tough cause I´m 6.5 and an amatuer with a full workscedule.
    But it does stay at home when I´m over the limit. :)
     
  12. jstraw

    jstraw New Member

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    What happens to the bike if you accidently ride it at 190? :p
     
  13. msrw

    msrw New Member

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    Just to ask the question....what exactly is your motive in shaving a few grams off an already very light bicycle? If you think those fewer grams are going to make any difference at all in the sort of riding you're doing, well, I submit respectfully that you are deluding yourself. If I were you, and I don't mean this in a nasty way or anything, I'd consider whether I was being unduly influenced by the marketing hype of the component manufacturers, rather than by any objective benefits that the sort of changes you're contemplating would engender.

    The best advice above: lose a couple of lbs. by cutting back on what you eat. That would be cheaper and better than a new set of wheels, given that you're already riding first rate equipment.
     
  14. mrowkoob

    mrowkoob New Member

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    Well Jstraw what happens is that I´m not as quick uphill that I´m supposed to be (ok want to be) and I exceed the weightlimit on the wheelset flexing it more and risking breakage and ofcourse there is no warranty when you break a wheelset for which you exceed the weightlimit.
     
  15. braso

    braso New Member

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    Hey guys,
    Why is everyone assuming I am a 'fattty'? I am 183cm and weigh in at 74kg's (Sorry I'm Aussie you do the conversion). I put myself in the light/mid range, and certainly don't want to be any lighter myself. I train and race with about half a dozen friends, and I classify myself as an all round rider. I am handy at the hills, but I want lighter/faster. Is that such an issue? I don't have loads of cash and I am just after some ideas how to get my bike lighter without throwing money away!! Thanks for your info anyway though, it has been very handy. I am thinking about getting a set of Kysirium's to start with.
     
  16. mrowkoob

    mrowkoob New Member

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    None is assuming you are fatty but trying to make you understand that the complete lightening of a bike is for the ultra fit prorider to ride when he is riding a mountain stage because he himself no longer can loose weight without it affecting his performance in a negative way.

    For us "normal mortal souls" lightening of the wheels is the primary concern since we albeit fit, usually still can loose af few pounds to improve performance.

    Ksyriums SSc sounds like a good choice a lot of riders use them and your weight should´nt affect them in a negative way.
     
  17. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    Fill the tubes and frame with helium and use a downtube front changer like Lance.
     
  18. Postie

    Postie New Member

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    Only one of my cycling friends has Kysirium SSC SL wheels and they are crazy nice rims. Not including a potential weight savings from tube/tire (depending on what you're riding now and what you could find as a good replacement), the rims alone are over a 400g weight savings. Given the "1 gram of rotational weight equals 4 grams of regular weight savings" rule, your ride would be like taking 1600g + off your bike.

    How's that for some weight savings?!?

    The upside is your purchase would also give you an extra set of wheels for a trainer or bad weather. Compare that to the price of a DA crank and the weight savings you'd get there.

    The downfall is that it is still expensive.

    I'd also consider Bontrager Race X Lite wheels. They are considered one of the most maintenance free light rims around and give you a similar weight savings.

    I was just looking at upgrading my mountain bike (my mountain bike wasn't nearly the ride my road bike is) and after looking at all the various things I could do to it, my cheapest option to get what I wanted was to sell my current bike to a friend and purchase a new one. But I guess by the time you get into an OCLV 120 frame, I can see how that gets pricey.

    I think the reason it looks like people are giving you a hard time is because people are saying "After you have decent equipment, the bulk of your edge is going to come from your body and not from the equipment." However feeling faster is something I say is worth a ton, and you can definitely get that by sprucing up your ride. Never thought of filling the tires with helium though. Bordeaux, that's just pure genius! ;)
     
  19. crystal_tears_

    crystal_tears_ New Member

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    Not sensible to shave weight other than rotational at first. Too much money to pay out for too little gain.
    I'd change the wheels, cranks, pedals, chain, rings and cassette.
    Then swap other components.
    You will realise maximum performance gains if you do things in this order.
     
  20. tafi

    tafi Member

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    I've riden a pair of Bontrager Select wheels. They certainly arent "select" components. They are not particularly taught or stiff and they aren't light.
    Stiffness can often be more important than weight too.
    You already hav a proffessional level frame so its best to look at ancillaries.

    But hang on. You aren't racing. So why the f**k are you bothering with this weight saving crap in the first place? Personally some people get carried away with this stuff and in the end don't ride their bike because it could be 200g lighter.

    I am a club racer and TTer in Sydney. I ride races up to 100km in length at the moment and I ride a bike that weighs 9.8kg without water bottles. However it is a solid reliable bike which i can trow around the turns easily. I take great delight in beating blokes on their 7kg machines.

    Don't throw the baby out with the bath water.
     
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