I want to buy a bike

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Znaya, Jun 11, 2003.

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  1. Znaya

    Znaya Guest

    Hi, I hope that this is the right forum to post this question. If it's not, I apologize and ask if
    you could tell me which one is more appropriate.

    I'm planning to buy a bike to do some travelling around and, maybe, to take abroad (in airplanes and
    trains) and do some cycling.

    Can anyone give me advices on the type of bike i should buy and/ or stores i should go to and other
    stuff you may find useful?

    I've been adviced to buy a folding Brompton. What is your opinion about those bikes? Do you think it
    would be a good choice for me?

    I live in Europe, where could i buy one of these?

    Thanks.
     
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  2. >I'm planning to buy a bike to do some travelling around and, maybe, to take abroad (in airplanes
    >and trains) and do some cycling.
    >
    >Can anyone give me advices on the type of bike i should buy and/ or stores i should go to and other
    >stuff you may find useful?
    >
    >I've been adviced to buy a folding Brompton. What is your opinion about those bikes? Do you think
    >it would be a good choice for me?
    >
    >I live in Europe, where could i buy one of these?
    >
    >Thanks.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >

    These are pretty well thought of: http://www.bikefriday.com/main.cfm?fuseaction=home.main Steve
     
  3. On 11 Jun 2003, Znaya wrote:

    > I'm planning to buy a bike to do some travelling around and, maybe, to take abroad (in airplanes
    > and trains) and do some cycling.
    >
    > Can anyone give me advices on the type of bike i should buy and/ or stores i should go to and
    > other stuff you may find useful?

    Lots of reviews and advice here: http://www.nordicgroup.us/fold/

    > I've been adviced to buy a folding Brompton. What is your opinion about those bikes? Do you think
    > it would be a good choice for me?

    I wouldn't want to ride very far on a Brompton, but I'm tall. If you are medium height or shorter
    then it might fit better.
     
  4. Tbgibb

    Tbgibb Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Znaya) writes:

    >'m planning to buy a bike to do some travelling around and, maybe, to take abroad (in airplanes and
    >trains) and do some cycling.
    >
    >Can anyone give me advices on the type of bike i should buy and/ or stores i should go to and other
    >stuff you may find useful?
    >
    >I've been adviced to buy a folding Brompton. What is your opinion about those bikes? Do you think
    >it would be a good choice for me?
    >
    >I live in Europe, where could i buy one of these?

    Another option is to get a bike with S&S couplings. A web search for S&S coupling will get ti for
    you or you could try: http://www.bilenky.com/index.htm for a USA frame builder that uses them. There
    are frame builders in Europe building with them too.

    You can get on an airplane with an intact bicycle, but airlines are charging more for this
    these days.

    Tom Gibb <[email protected]
     
  5. Znaya <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I've been adviced to buy a folding Brompton. What is your opinion about those bikes? Do you think
    >it would be a good choice for me?

    As far as I know, the Brompton is by far the best bike for folding - a practiced Bromptoneer can
    fold one in about 15 seconds - and is OK to ride on. You can get nicer riding folders, like the Bike
    Friday, but the fold is a matter of minutes, not seconds.

    >I live in Europe, where could i buy one of these?

    I presume you live on the Continent - where?
    --
    David Damerell <[email protected]> Kill the tomato!
     
  6. Znaya

    Znaya Guest

    David Damerell <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<sLB*[email protected]>...

    > >I live in Europe, where could i buy one of these?
    >
    > I presume you live on the Continent - where?

    Portugal
     
  7. Znaya

    Znaya Guest

    > BUT - they aren't touring bikes, and I wouldn't want to ride more than say 10-15 miles at a
    > stretch on one. They are also harder work than a full size bike, so high mileage touring on one is
    > out for all but fanatics.

    That's what i thought! Fantastic for city but maybe not so good for extensive touring (and that's
    exactly what i want to do!).

    I read http://www.nordicgroup.us/fold/ and there were two bikes which called my attention.

    1. Kira Backcountry (http://www.kiracorp.co.jp/EG/pro/Foliding.html) It's japanese and it has 26"
    wheels (i've been told that 26" and 28" wheels are better for extensive touring...)

    2. Montague Urban At the bottom of http://www.nordicgroup.us/fold/ , in "My opinions" the author
    says he selected this bike for extensive touring and it is very comfortable, although when folded
    it's bigger than several other bikes. He also says that Gaerlan GT20 would be the best choice
    but... i believe its wheels are too small...

    3. Marin Bolimas Ridge (http://www.bicycledoctor.co.uk/p_marinbolinasridge.html) I saw this bike
    today in a bike shop and it seemed very good. It costs 405 Euros without acessories and 575,75
    Euros with front and rear bags, water bottle, aditional "road" wheels (don't know if this is the
    correct name). Is this a good choice?

    I'm very confused and my knowledge about bikes is extremely limited.

    Thanks everybody for the advices.

    P.S.: I'm sorry for any gramatical mistake.
     
  8. Znaya <[email protected]> wrote:
    >David Damerell <[email protected]>:
    >>>I live in Europe, where could i buy one of these?
    >>I presume you live on the Continent - where?
    >Portugal

    Hm. I'm pretty sure the Germans get them, but that doesn't help you much. It might be cheaper to fly
    to Britain and buy one. :-(
    --
    David Damerell <[email protected]> Kill the tomato!
     
  9. On 13 Jun 2003, Znaya wrote: ...
    > That's what i thought! Fantastic for city but maybe not so good for extensive touring (and that's
    > exactly what i want to do!).

    You might take a look at http://www.greenbicycle.com Some small wheelers are very good and
    comfortable for touring.
     
  10. [email protected] (Znaya) wrote in message
    news:<114cfbc8.0306130616.41[email protected]>... <cut>
    >
    > I read http://www.nordicgroup.us/fold/ and there were two bikes which called my attention.
    >

    > 1. Kira Backcountry (http://www.kiracorp.co.jp/EG/pro/Foliding.html) It's japanese and it has 26"
    > wheels (i've been told that 26" and 28" wheels are better for extensive touring...)
    >
    > 2. Montague Urban At the bottom of http://www.nordicgroup.us/fold/ , in "My opinions" the author
    > says he selected this bike for extensive touring and it is very comfortable, although when
    > folded it's bigger than several other bikes. He also says that Gaerlan GT20 would be the best
    > choice but... i believe its wheels are too small...
    >
    These both use essentially the same folding strategy (indeed, the frames may be the same) - with the
    rear triangle attached to an oversized seat tube which acts as a sleeve over the "real" seat tube.

    I have some, but limited, experience of this sort of bike. Being essentially a "real" bike they will
    give a more comfortable riding position, but won't fold neatly enough to carry easily onto a bus
    like a Brompton (where the messy bits fold inside and the folded package stands up unaided, and is
    small, less than 2 ft long by 2ft high).

    The bikes you suggest would certainly need a bag, and may need further disassembly when folded to
    protect vulnerable bits like the chainwheel. For touring, adding a rack will prevent complete
    folding (unlike a Brompton, where the rack acts as a stand for the folded bike).

    Although at first sight a good compromise, you may well discover that these bikes have only small
    advantage over disassembling a non-folding bike and packing it in a bike box (many available and
    acceptable for air travel).

    When on cycling holidays I always take a "proper" bike. It may mean being a bit more organised over
    making cycle reservations on trains etc, but doesn't usually present insurmountable obstacles.

    Your web site reference is excellent, but with folding bikes particularly, there is nothing like
    trying them out to see if they meet your requirements (which may have as much to do with how easy
    they are to fold and carry as how well they ride).

    Best of luck in your quest.

    Andrew Webster
     
  11. [email protected] (Znaya) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Doug Milliken <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > On 13 Jun 2003, Znaya wrote: ...
    > > > That's what i thought! Fantastic for city but maybe not so good for extensive touring (and
    > > > that's exactly what i want to do!).
    > >
    > >
    > > You might take a look at http://www.greenbicycle.com Some small wheelers are very good and
    > > comfortable for touring.
    >

    Agreed, Moultons are very high class bikes with a faithful (almost religious) following who swear by
    integrated suspension and smallish wheels.

    > I thought it would be much more tiring to travel a lot on small wheels... but that guy seems to go
    > everywhere on small wheels!
    >

    The Moulton is 17 inch, much bigger than Brompton wheels (14 inch). It takes apart rather than
    folds, so it's not really a hop on the bus, get off and start cycling sort of bike.

    The big issue for me (and possibly others) is price. The price point of Moultons (AM series) puts
    them at over twice the cost of a decent touring bike with S&S couplers fitted. On the plus side,
    they are more compact when taken apart and available "off the shelf".

    >Now i'm confused.

    No, I think you simply have lots of choice, particularly if budget is not a constraining factor.

    Andrew Webster
     
  12. <cut>

    Just as a follow up. Having visited my local Moulton dealer I find that, indeed, Moultons built
    by Moulton have 17in wheels, but those built by Pashley have4 20". Neither is very compact when
    taken apart.

    While there I think I have found exactly what you are looking for in the shape of the Airnimal (see
    http://www.airnimal.com/airnimal.html).

    From a short acquaintance they seem excellent, are as light as most tourers, feel like a normal bike
    with just a little "give" due to the rubber block suspension in the middle and fold/dismantle into a
    very small space - with hard case sold specifically for the purpose.

    I will be saving up for one of these myself!
     
  13. Jack Kessler

    Jack Kessler Guest

    One can push that one step further and disassemble a non-folding bicycle and put it not in a case
    but in a cheap grommeted polyfiber tarp, available in most hardware stores for USD5 to 10, depending
    on size. I wrap everything in no less than two large rolls of duct tape. The tape holds everything
    together inside the tarp and then goes liberally all around the outside of the tarp. The tarp
    functions as a ground cloth or lean-to or windbreak or whatever during the tour. At the destination
    airport one reuses the tarp and the two additional large rolls of duct tape. Both the tarp and the
    tape are cheap, light, have many uses, and can be had in fancy colors if one is so inclined.

    I have used this packing technique in both North America and Africa and never had a problem
    with breakage.

    "Andrew Webster" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] (Znaya) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > <cut>
    > >
    > > I read http://www.nordicgroup.us/fold/ and there were two bikes which called my attention.
    > >
    >
    > > 1. Kira Backcountry (http://www.kiracorp.co.jp/EG/pro/Foliding.html) It's japanese and it has
    > > 26" wheels (i've been told that 26" and 28" wheels are better for extensive touring...)
    > >
    > > 2. Montague Urban At the bottom of http://www.nordicgroup.us/fold/ , in "My opinions" the author
    > > says he selected this bike for extensive touring and it is very comfortable, although when
    > > folded it's bigger than several other bikes. He also says that Gaerlan GT20 would be the best
    > > choice but... i believe its wheels are too small...
    > >
    > These both use essentially the same folding strategy (indeed, the frames may be the same) -
    > with the rear triangle attached to an oversized seat tube which acts as a sleeve over the
    > "real" seat tube.
    >
    > I have some, but limited, experience of this sort of bike. Being essentially a "real" bike they
    > will give a more comfortable riding position, but won't fold neatly enough to carry easily onto a
    > bus like a Brompton (where the messy bits fold inside and the folded package stands up unaided,
    > and is small, less than 2 ft long by 2ft high).
    >
    > The bikes you suggest would certainly need a bag, and may need further disassembly when folded to
    > protect vulnerable bits like the chainwheel. For touring, adding a rack will prevent complete
    > folding (unlike a Brompton, where the rack acts as a stand for the folded bike).
    >
    > Although at first sight a good compromise, you may well discover that these bikes have only small
    > advantage over disassembling a non-folding bike and packing it in a bike box (many available and
    > acceptable for air travel).
    >
    > When on cycling holidays I always take a "proper" bike. It may mean being a bit more organised
    > over making cycle reservations on trains etc, but doesn't usually present insurmountable
    > obstacles.
    >
    > Your web site reference is excellent, but with folding bikes particularly, there is nothing like
    > trying them out to see if they meet your requirements (which may have as much to do with how easy
    > they are to fold and carry as how well they ride).
    >
    > Best of luck in your quest.
    >
    >
    > Andrew Webster
     
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