I want to run again

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Jj, Feb 27, 2004.

  1. Jj

    Jj Guest

    I'll be 45 next week. Over the past 7 years I've put on maybe 50 pounds working at an insane job -
    I'm now about 210lbs at 5'8". I've got to admit I love the job and actually love the long hours, so
    I have only myself to blame.

    I used to run a lot. Not particularly long distances, maybe 35 to 50 miles per week at 7:00 to 8:00
    pace. My weight then was between 135 and 150lbs. Not due to the running per se, just general
    lifestyle (rock climbing, biking, running). I haven't run much at all in the past 10 years.

    I've felt that the maximum weight that I could comfortably run at was maybe 175lbs. Years ago I
    experienced some shin splints and knee pain when I overdid it and wasn't resting properly. At the
    time the injuries laid me off from running for up to six months (knees) but were always recoverable.
    This is the main reason I've not gotten back into running for the last couple of years. I've been
    hoping to get my weight back to where I don't hurt myself, but haven't had much success. I've been
    biking a lot, but just can't get the same CV workout that running seemed to give and it hasn't done
    much for the weight.

    Now I (literally) dream about running again. I need to change my lifestyle dramatically and I feel
    there's nothing like looking forward to an evening run and setting time/distance goals to keep you
    focused and eating right.

    Are there any exercise gurus or medical professionals out there that can comment on whether it's
    at all wise to begin running again at my weight? I see some amazingly "hefty" folks running and
    can't help but wonder if those guys are doing themselves good or bad by attempting this. They're
    not too gracious, but my hat's off to them just the same. I'm thinking that even if I can get in
    just two short runs a week, over time I can gradually regain some fitness - maybe even drop a
    couple dozen pounds.
     
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  2. SwStudio

    SwStudio Guest

    "JJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > I'll be 45 next week. Over the past 7 years I've put on maybe 50 pounds working at an insane job -
    > I'm now about 210lbs at 5'8". I've got to admit I love the job and actually love the long hours,
    > so I have only myself to blame.
    >
    > I used to run a lot. Not particularly long distances, maybe 35 to 50 miles per week at 7:00 to
    > 8:00 pace. My weight then was between 135 and 150lbs. Not due to the running per se, just general
    > lifestyle (rock climbing, biking, running). I haven't run much at all in the past 10 years.
    >
    > I've felt that the maximum weight that I could comfortably run at was maybe 175lbs. Years ago I
    > experienced some shin splints and knee pain when I overdid it and wasn't resting properly. At the
    > time the injuries laid me off from running for up to six months (knees) but were always
    > recoverable. This is the main reason I've not gotten back into running for the last couple of
    > years. I've been hoping to get my weight back to where I don't hurt myself, but haven't had much
    > success. I've been biking a lot, but just can't get the same CV workout that running seemed to
    > give and it hasn't done much for the weight.
    >
    > Now I (literally) dream about running again. I need to change my lifestyle dramatically and I feel
    > there's nothing like looking forward to an evening run and setting time/distance goals to keep you
    > focused and eating right.
    >
    > Are there any exercise gurus or medical professionals out there that can comment on whether it's
    > at all wise to begin running again at my weight? I see some amazingly "hefty" folks running and
    > can't help but wonder if those guys are doing themselves good or bad by attempting this. They're
    > not too gracious, but my hat's off to them just the same. I'm thinking that even if I can get in
    > just two short runs a week, over time I can gradually regain some fitness - maybe even drop a
    > couple dozen pounds.

    Of course it's okay! You were a runner before, so you probably have good subconscious memory of
    form, pacing, and so on, so you are ahead of the game already in some aspects. All you need to do it
    be careful and realistic. I was an inactive smoker for many years, and although not overweight, our
    goals were/are similar. I made my change in early 2000. Here's some thoughts:

    Make sure you get a GOOD pair of real running shoes at a real running store. Start off slow - your
    ideas sound good, but I would add other things to improve your aerobic capicity while you 'learn to
    run' again. Elliptical trainers, stationary bikes, swimming etc, are great ways to help you get back
    to regular running again, and also to introduce that "structure" of physical activity on a regular
    basis that you mentioned wanting back in your life.

    cheers,
    --
    David (in Hamilton, ON) www.allfalldown.org
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, JJ wrote:

    > Are there any exercise gurus or medical professionals out there that can comment on whether it's
    > at all wise to begin running again at my weight? I see some amazingly "hefty" folks running and
    > can't help but wonder if those guys are doing themselves good or bad by attempting this. They're
    > not too gracious, but my hat's off to them just the same. I'm thinking that even if I can get in
    > just two short runs a week, over time I can gradually regain some fitness - maybe even drop a
    > couple dozen pounds.

    You'll be more vulnerable to injury because of the extra weight. This doesn't mean that you can't
    run, it means that you need to train smart and not try to do too much too soon. Diet is also very
    important, probably more so than exercise at this stage.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  4. >Are there any exercise gurus or medical professionals out there that can comment on whether it's
    >at all wise to begin running again at my weight? I see some amazingly "hefty" folks running and
    >can't help but wonder if those guys are doing themselves good or bad by attempting this. They're
    >not too gracious, but my hat's off to them just the same. I'm thinking that even if I can get in
    >just two short runs a week, over time I can gradually regain some fitness - maybe even drop a
    >couple dozen pounds.

    My story is similar to yours: 15 months ago I hit 217 pounds (I'm 6 feet even, or 1.80 meters) and
    decided to get serious about training again. My specific strategy was to join a gym so I'd have a
    place to cross-train and access to treadmills for bad-weather days (thunderstorms, ice storms, 90-
    plus degree days). I got some sessions with a personal trainer, and we focused on nutrition & diet
    at first, then got serious about working out.

    I was running from the start. Took it easy and cross-trained a lot, but then the weight started
    coming off, and I was able to run more. I dropped to 182 pounds within a few months, where I've been
    for nearly a year now; I'd like to get below 170 but for now I'm happy to have consolidated the
    loss. More to the point my 10K times have dropped from 55:20 around Thanksgiving 2002 to 42:00 last
    month. My goals for this year are a sub-40 10K and a 3:05 marathon.

    You probably need to watch what you eat at least as much as your workout regimen; it's easy to eat
    enough calories to make up what you burn off and not lose any weight. And pay attention to your
    running form.

    But the bottom line is, I got back into running and did fine. My only injuries have been a couple of
    strained muscles during a high (for me) -mileage marathon buildup.

    Good luck!

    --
    Brian P. Baresch Fort Worth, Texas, USA Professional editing and proofreading

    If you're going through hell, keep going. --Winston Churchill
     
  5. Nes

    Nes Guest

  6. In article <[email protected]>, Nes wrote:
    > Donovan Rebbechi <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]<snipthecrap>
    >
    > Ignore him, he's a dainty little treadmill jogger.

    But you can't ignore us! Our ranks are growing day by day. Even the president of the worlds most
    powerful country is a treadmill jogger. Treadmill joggers control the world, and we're coming for
    you Bill. You will be assimilated. One morning, you'll awake from your usual drunken slumber to find
    your lovely elliptical replaced by a horrid monstrosity of a treadmill. But the worst part is,
    you'll love your treadmill, the same way Winston Smith loves Big Brother at the end of 1984.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  7. Kirk Leach

    Kirk Leach Guest

    JJ <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > I've felt that the maximum weight that I could comfortably run at was maybe 175lbs.

    I'm 5 feet,10 inches. I regularly ran 20-25 miles week at 220 pounds. Started marathon training at
    215, dropped to 205 averaging 35 or so a week, ran the marathon in 4:04. I still weight about 198
    and do 20-25 mile weeks. And I have hardly ever been injured, except for one short bout with PF, and
    another with runner's knee. No big deal.

    Don't worry about the weight. The key will be bumping up your mileage very slowly, and running
    slowly, like 10-11 minute miles to start. And buying good shoes for heavy runners.

    Kirk Leach Tegucigalpa, Honduras
     
  8. Nes

    Nes Guest

  9. Cssports

    Cssports Guest

    "JJ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I'll be 45 next week. Over the past 7 years I've put on maybe 50 pounds working at an insane job -
    > I'm now about 210lbs at 5'8". I've got to admit I love the job and actually love the long hours,
    > so I have only myself to blame.
    >
    > I used to run a lot. Not particularly long distances, maybe 35 to 50 miles per week at 7:00 to
    > 8:00 pace. My weight then was between 135 and 150lbs. Not due to the running per se, just general
    > lifestyle (rock climbing, biking, running). I haven't run much at all in the past 10 years.
    >

    Similar story for me- lots of traveling, went from 185 lbs to 245 lbs in 2 years.

    Now in a job that allows me to run in the morning or at lunch, and I've gone from 245 to about 200.
    Although I ran injury-free in the past, I've had to work through some knee problems. Take everyone's
    advice and get a pair of good running shoes made for heavy runners. Go to a store that specializes
    in running shoes.

    Start slowly, make it a habit and stick with it. Good luck.

    Mike
     
  10. If you dream about jogging, it means that even your own mind has given up on you.
     
  11. Kirk Leach

    Kirk Leach Guest

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