I want to try making Pierogi for someone

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Sf, Feb 1, 2004.

  1. Sf

    Sf Guest

    We are having a "when I was a kid" discussion during the superbowl and one person remembers Kilbasa
    at practically every meal and Pierogis accompanied the kilbasa along with borscht (which was another
    "we had it at every meal" item)

    What is the Ukraine way to make Pierogis? Potatoes, cheese and what IS ingredient #3? He insists
    there is another one. It's not the grilled onions, because they go on top with the sour cream,
    according to him.

    http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art7697.asp Fillings:

    For Russian dumplings (pierogi ruskie) Cooked potatoes and white cheese (pot or cottage) mashed or
    ground, add cut fried onion, add pepper, salt, marjoram, dill mixed thoroughly.

    Borscht recipe - Ukrainian

    Cuisine: Ukrainian, Yield: 10 Servings · Ingredients

    1 qt Water 2 qt Beef stock 3 T Sunflower oil 2 c Beer (not Lite) -or- 2 c Beet kvass 2 ea Beets, lg.
    peeled & julienned 4 lb Beef, chuck w/ bone 3 T Red wine vinegar
    1/2 lb Smoked pork butt 2 T Butter (NOT margarine) 1 ea Carrot, lg. scraped, diced 1 ea Onion, med.
    coarse chopped 1 small head of Cabbage, shredded 3 T Tomato paste 1 1/2 T Salt Black pepper to
    taste 4 T Parsley, minced 1 c Potato, peeled & diced 1/2in
    2/2 c Sour cream

    Method In a large stockpot bring the beef to a boil in 2 1/2 qts. water with 1 T of salt. After 10
    minutes of boiling reduce heat & simmer for 30 minutes more, then remove meat, cool and remove meat
    from bone & cube 1/2". In a large skillet on heat the oil on medium heat. Sauté the onion, beets, &
    carrot until they are soft. Add the potato & butter then cook for 2 minutes more. In the mean time
    bring the beef stock, water & beer (or kvass) to a boil in the stockpot. Add salt & pepper, vinegar,
    & meat. Drain the beet-carrot-onion & potato mixture & add to stockpot. Reduce heat & cook for 20
    min. then add cabbage, tomato paste & pork butt. Cook another 30 to 45 minutes. Remove from heat &
    allow to cool to room temperature. Refrigerate overnight, re-heat and serve. A large dollop or 2 of
    sour cream in the soup is mandatory when served. Allow each person to stir it in themselves. *NOTE:
    You may add 1 1/2 cups of cooked white beans to this soup if you wish but if you do so soak them in
    the vinegar then add them to the soup.

    Recipe source: Dr. Donald Houston's collection ORIGIN: Taisa Kamnotsky, Kyiv-Ukraine Posted by Yuri
    Timohin http://www.ruscuisine.com

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
    Tags:


  2. sf <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]
    4ax.com:

    >
    > We are having a "when I was a kid" discussion during the superbowl and one person remembers
    > Kilbasa at practically every meal and Pierogis accompanied the kilbasa along with borscht (which
    > was another "we had it at every meal" item)
    >
    > What is the Ukraine way to make Pierogis? Potatoes, cheese and what IS ingredient #3? He insists
    > there is another one. It's not the grilled onions, because they go on top with the sour cream,
    > according to him.

    The potato and cheese filling I make has only the two ingredients - potatoes and cheese, apart from
    seasoning. I use only salt and pepper.

    Wayne
     
  3. Jarkat2002

    Jarkat2002 Guest

    >We are having a "when I was a kid" discussion during the superbowl and one person remembers Kilbasa
    >at practically every meal and Pierogis accompanied the kilbasa along with borscht (which was
    >another "we had it at every meal" item)
    >

    I have never made them ... and won't ... these are the best pierogi on earth
    IMO. I buy them on my weekly shopping trip to the west side market in cleveland ohio.

    http://piepal.com/welcome.ftml

    the west side URL is www.westsidemarket.com

    and they ship :)

    ~Kat

    What did my hands do before they held you? Sylvia Plath (1932 - 1963)
     
  4. [email protected] (Jarkat2002) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >>We are having a "when I was a kid" discussion during the superbowl and one person remembers
    >>Kilbasa at practically every meal and Pierogis accompanied the kilbasa along with borscht (which
    >>was another "we had it at every meal" item)
    >>
    >
    > I have never made them ... and won't ... these are the best pierogi on earth IMO. I buy them on my
    > weekly shopping trip to the west side market in cleveland ohio.
    >
    > http://piepal.com/welcome.ftml
    >
    > the west side URL is www.westsidemarket.com
    >
    >
    > and they ship :)
    >
    > ~Kat

    Ah, fantastic place, the West Side Market! I sure miss shopping there.

    Can you refresh my memory? What was the name of the pierogi restaurant on Ridge Road in Parma (not
    far from Snow Road)? Their pierogi were also quite good. Actually, I thought it was also called
    Pierogi Palace.

    I have no choice but to make my own pierogi now. Nothing good is available where I now live. Like
    Barb, I tend to make huge batches and freeze them for later use. I usually make potato and cheese,
    fried cabbage with a bit of onion, and prune or lekvar (prefer using chopped stewed prunes instead
    of commercial lekvar). I sometimes make them with kraut, but I really prefer the fried cabbage.

    Of course, always served with slightly browned butter with onion and sides of sour cream and
    homemade chunky applesauce.

    Thanks, Wayne
     
  5. Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    > sf <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected] 4ax.com:
    >
    >
    >>We are having a "when I was a kid" discussion during the superbowl and one person remembers
    >>Kilbasa at practically every meal and Pierogis accompanied the kilbasa along with borscht (which
    >>was another "we had it at every meal" item)
    >>
    >>What is the Ukraine way to make Pierogis? Potatoes, cheese and what IS ingredient #3? He insists
    >>there is another one. It's not the grilled onions, because they go on top with the sour cream,
    >>according to him.
    >
    >
    > The potato and cheese filling I make has only the two ingredients - potatoes and cheese, apart
    > from seasoning. I use only salt and pepper.
    >
    > Wayne

    Actually some chopped fried onion (but not browned) is also traditionally added to this filling.

    Monika
     
  6. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    sf wrote:
    >
    > We are having a "when I was a kid" discussion during the superbowl and one person remembers
    > Kilbasa at practically every meal and Pierogis accompanied the kilbasa along with borscht (which
    > was another "we had it at every meal" item)
    >
    > What is the Ukraine way to make Pierogis? Potatoes, cheese and what IS ingredient #3? He insists
    > there is another one. It's not the grilled onions, because they go on top with the sour cream,
    > according to him.

    Sauerkraut?

    nancy
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, Wayne
    Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > The potato and cheese filling I make has only the two ingredients - potatoes and cheese, apart
    > from seasoning. I use only salt and pepper.
    >
    > Wayne

    Are we talking mashed potato with yellow cheese melted in? I add some fried onion to the mix, too.
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 1-31-04 A good friend will come and bail you out of jail; a
    true friend will be sitting next to you saying, "Damn,that was fun!"
     
  8. Monika Adamczyk <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >
    >> sf <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected] 4ax.com:
    >>
    >>
    >>>We are having a "when I was a kid" discussion during the superbowl and one person remembers
    >>>Kilbasa at practically every meal and Pierogis accompanied the kilbasa along with borscht (which
    >>>was another "we had it at every meal" item)
    >>>
    >>>What is the Ukraine way to make Pierogis? Potatoes, cheese and what IS ingredient #3? He insists
    >>>there is another one. It's not the grilled onions, because they go on top with the sour cream,
    >>>according to him.
    >>
    >>
    >> The potato and cheese filling I make has only the two ingredients - potatoes and cheese, apart
    >> from seasoning. I use only salt and pepper.
    >>
    >> Wayne
    >
    > Actually some chopped fried onion (but not browned) is also traditionally added to this filling.
    >
    > Monika
    >

    I'll bow to that, as will my next batch! I'm not Slovak, and my neighbor taught me how to make
    pierogi years ago. She wasn't Slovak either, but her husband was. I'm sure that much was lost in the
    round-about lesson.

    Thanks, Wayne
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote: (snip)
    > I have no choice but to make my own pierogi now. Nothing good is available where I now live. Like
    > Barb, I tend to make huge batches and freeze them for later use. I usually make potato and cheese,
    > fried cabbage with a bit of onion, and prune or lekvar (prefer using chopped stewed prunes instead
    > of commercial lekvar).

    Try plumping the whole pitted prune (excuse me, PLUM) and rolling it in some cinnamon sugar -- 1
    whole one per dumpling.

    Fried cabbage, huh? Isn't it wet? How do you make it not wet?

    I sometimes make them with
    > kraut, but I really prefer the fried cabbage.
    >
    > Of course, always served with slightly browned butter with onion and sides of sour cream and
    > homemade chunky applesauce.

    APPLESAUCE? Are you NUTS? <LOL!> I don't even desecrate them with sour cream. I'm a purist -- you
    can ask Victor.
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 1-31-04 A good friend will come and bail you out of jail; a
    true friend will be sitting next to you saying, "Damn,that was fun!"
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>, Monika Adamczyk <[email protected]>
    wrote: (snip)
    > > The potato and cheese filling I make has only the two ingredients - potatoes and cheese, apart
    > > from seasoning. I use only salt and pepper.
    > >
    > > Wayne
    >
    > Actually some chopped fried onion (but not browned) is also traditionally added to this filling.
    >
    > Monika

    All right, MON-ika! I yam affirmed.
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 1-31-04 A good friend will come and bail you out of jail; a
    true friend will be sitting next to you saying, "Damn,that was fun!"
     
  11. Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    > Monika Adamczyk <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >
    >
    >>Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>sf <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected] 4ax.com:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>We are having a "when I was a kid" discussion during the superbowl and one person remembers
    >>>>Kilbasa at practically every meal and Pierogis accompanied the kilbasa along with borscht (which
    >>>>was another "we had it at every meal" item)
    >>>>
    >>>>What is the Ukraine way to make Pierogis? Potatoes, cheese and what IS ingredient #3? He insists
    >>>>there is another one. It's not the grilled onions, because they go on top with the sour cream,
    >>>>according to him.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>The potato and cheese filling I make has only the two ingredients - potatoes and cheese, apart
    >>>from seasoning. I use only salt and pepper.
    >>>
    >>>Wayne
    >>
    >>Actually some chopped fried onion (but not browned) is also traditionally added to this filling.
    >>
    >>Monika
    >>
    >
    >
    > I'll bow to that, as will my next batch! I'm not Slovak, and my neighbor taught me how to make
    > pierogi years ago. She wasn't Slovak either, but her husband was. I'm sure that much was lost in
    > the round-about lesson.
    >
    > Thanks, Wayne

    Neither am I. That's the way Poles make 'ruskie' pierogi. :)

    Monika
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote: (snip)
    > I'll bow to that, as will my next batch! I'm not Slovak, and my neighbor taught me how to make
    > pierogi years ago. She wasn't Slovak either, but her husband was. I'm sure that much was lost in
    > the round-about lesson.
    >
    > Thanks,

    > Wayne

    So, if your knowledge comes via an honorable Slovensko, how's about you straighten up and call them
    pirohy as is meet, right, and salutary? Pierogi is Polish. Yeah, I AM nitpicky. :)
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 1-31-04 A good friend will come and bail you out of jail; a
    true friend will be sitting next to you saying, "Damn,that was fun!"
     
  13. Monika Adamczyk <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >
    >> Monika Adamczyk <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>sf <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected] 4ax.com:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>We are having a "when I was a kid" discussion during the superbowl and one person remembers
    >>>>>Kilbasa at practically every meal and Pierogis accompanied the kilbasa along with borscht
    >>>>>(which was another "we had it at every meal" item)
    >>>>>
    >>>>>What is the Ukraine way to make Pierogis? Potatoes, cheese and what IS ingredient #3? He
    >>>>>insists there is another one. It's not the grilled onions, because they go on top with the sour
    >>>>>cream, according to him.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>The potato and cheese filling I make has only the two ingredients - potatoes and cheese, apart
    >>>>from seasoning. I use only salt and pepper.
    >>>>
    >>>>Wayne
    >>>
    >>>Actually some chopped fried onion (but not browned) is also traditionally added to this filling.
    >>>
    >>>Monika
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >> I'll bow to that, as will my next batch! I'm not Slovak, and my neighbor taught me how to make
    >> pierogi years ago. She wasn't Slovak either, but her husband was. I'm sure that much was lost in
    >> the round-about lesson.
    >>
    >> Thanks, Wayne
    >
    > Neither am I. That's the way Poles make 'ruskie' pierogi. :)
    >
    > Monika
    >

    Regardless of origin, it still sounds like a great addition.

    Wayne
     
  14. [email protected] (Jarkat2002) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    >>Ah, fantastic place, the West Side Market! I sure miss shopping there.
    >>
    >>Can you refresh my memory? What was the name of the pierogi restaurant on Ridge Road in Parma (not
    >>far from Snow Road)?
    >
    > Sorry Wayne .. I'm not sure .. but I'll look tomorrow as I drive by. I'm in that area most
    > every day.
    >
    >
    > ~Kat

    Thanks, Kat. BTW, I like your sig.
    >
    >
    > What did my hands do before they held you? Sylvia Plath (1932 - 1963)
     
  15. Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote in news:barbschaller-
    [email protected]:

    > In article <[email protected]>, Wayne Boatwright
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> The potato and cheese filling I make has only the two ingredients - potatoes and cheese, apart
    >> from seasoning. I use only salt and pepper.
    >>
    >> Wayne
    >
    > Are we talking mashed potato with yellow cheese melted in? I add some fried onion to the mix, too.

    Yep, that's what we're talking. I'm gonna try adding the onion next time.
     
  16. Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > In article <[email protected]>, Wayne Boatwright
    > <WayneB[email protected]> wrote: (snip)
    >> I have no choice but to make my own pierogi now. Nothing good is available where I now live. Like
    >> Barb, I tend to make huge batches and freeze them for later use. I usually make potato and
    >> cheese, fried cabbage with a bit of onion, and prune or lekvar (prefer using chopped stewed
    >> prunes instead of commercial lekvar).
    >
    > Try plumping the whole pitted prune (excuse me, PLUM) and rolling it in some cinnamon sugar -- 1
    > whole one per dumpling.

    Sometimes I do use a whole prune but never thought about the cinnamon sugar. I'll give that a try.

    > Fried cabbage, huh? Isn't it wet? How do you make it not wet?

    No, not wet at all. Chop the cabbage in 1/4-1/2 inch pieces and cook it very slowly in butter along
    wiht a bit of onion. The moisture will cook out by the time the cabbage is light golden. It's really
    very good.

    > I sometimes make them with
    >> kraut, but I really prefer the fried cabbage.
    >>
    >> Of course, always served with slightly browned butter with onion and sides of sour cream and
    >> homemade chunky applesauce.
    >
    > APPLESAUCE? Are you NUTS? <LOL!> I don't even desecrate them with sour cream. I'm a purist -- you
    > can ask Victor.

    Heh. Most of my fillings, except the prune, are a tad on the salty side. I really like the contrast
    of the applesauce. I often forego the sour cream myself.
     
  17. Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:barbschaller-804450.22490501[email protected]:

    > In article <[email protected]>, Wayne Boatwright
    > <[email protected]> wrote: (snip)
    >> I'll bow to that, as will my next batch! I'm not Slovak, and my neighbor taught me how to make
    >> pierogi years ago. She wasn't Slovak either, but her husband was. I'm sure that much was lost in
    >> the round-about lesson.
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >
    >> Wayne
    >
    > So, if your knowledge comes via an honorable Slovensko, how's about you straighten up and call
    > them pirohy as is meet, right, and salutary? Pierogi is Polish. Yeah, I AM nitpicky. :)

    Yeah, you are, but that's part of your "charm"! <G> Well, nobody ever really told me how to spell
    it. I've just picked up what I've seen in print and didn't really know the nationality difference. I
    can just as easily call them pirohy. <G
     
  18. Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article <Xns9482[email protected]>, Wayne Boatwright
    > <[email protected]> wrote: (snip)
    >>
    >>Of course, always served with slightly browned butter with onion and sides of sour cream and
    >>homemade chunky applesauce.
    >
    >
    > APPLESAUCE? Are you NUTS? <LOL!> I don't even desecrate them with sour cream. I'm a purist -- you
    > can ask Victor.

    You a purist? I am laughing so hard, my sides hurt. A purist who makes triangular pierogi? What will
    you say next? And potato pierogi without sour cream, that's almost a sacrilege.
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>, Wayne
    Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote in news:barbschaller-
    > [email protected]:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>, Wayne Boatwright
    > > <[email protected]> wrote: (snip)
    > >> I'll bow to that, as will my next batch! I'm not Slovak, and my neighbor taught me how to make
    > >> pierogi years ago. She wasn't Slovak either, but her husband was. I'm sure that much was lost
    > >> in the round-about lesson.
    > >>
    > >> Thanks,
    > >
    > >> Wayne
    > >
    > > So, if your knowledge comes via an honorable Slovensko, how's about you straighten up and call
    > > them pirohy as is meet, right, and salutary? Pierogi is Polish. Yeah, I AM nitpicky. :)
    >
    > Yeah, you are, but that's part of your "charm"! <G> Well, nobody ever really told me how to spell
    > it. I've just picked up what I've seen in print and didn't really know the nationality difference.
    > I can just as easily call them pirohy. <G>

    I salute you! You honor the ancestors! Na zdravie! Dobru' chut'!
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> updated 1-31-04 A good friend will come and bail you out of jail; a
    true friend will be sitting next to you saying, "Damn,that was fun!"
     
  20. Kilikini

    Kilikini Guest

    Okay, maybe I'm ethnically challenged, but from reading the thread, I assume a pierogi (pirohy) is a
    potato filled dumpling. But you put sour cream on it? Prunes? Applesauce? I'm imagining something
    similar to gnocchi (although I personally have never had gnocchi either - not easy to find on Maui).
    What is the traditional way to serve pierogi or is it sort of like an anything-goes dish?

    kilikini
     
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