Ice Blocks for Diabetics?



N

Nev.

Guest
In the centre of the universe where I live it is mid summer, and I would love to be able to eat
lovely cold, sweet ice blocks just like pre diabetic times.

Does anyone know of any very low sugar ice blocks?

I have been thinking of taking some diet cordial, i.e. .5% sugar, adding some equal or splenda, and
maybe gelatine, and trying that.

Has anybody in this news group got a low -> zero sugar recipe for ice blocks that works?

TIA,

Nev.
 
A

Alan

Guest
On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 21:57:01 +1000, "Nev."
<[email protected]> wrote:

>In the centre of the universe where I live it is mid summer, and I would love to be able to eat
>lovely cold, sweet ice blocks just like pre diabetic times.
>
>Does anyone know of any very low sugar ice blocks?
>
>I have been thinking of taking some diet cordial, i.e. .5% sugar, adding some equal or splenda, and
>maybe gelatine, and trying that.
>
>Has anybody in this news group got a low -> zero sugar recipe for ice blocks that works?
>
>TIA,
>
>Nev.
>

Hi Nev

Nice to hear from a mate from this side of the equator.

I do the following for a cool drink. Turning it into an ice-block may work. Juice enough citrus
(orange, lime, lemon, "lemonade", shaddock, whatever) to fill an ice-cube tray. Freeze. Add one or
two cubes to a
1.25 litre diet lemonade or cola; or add a cube to a glass before serving. Preferrably use the cheap
"home" brands for this.

For an ice block, add the juice direct to your bottle then pour into your mould before freezing. If
you only add the equivalent of a couple of ice-cubes it is enough to improve the flavour without
significantly increasing the carbs from fructose. Experiment.

Incidentally, for cool drinks, Saxby's have just come out with Cherry Cheer and Creaming Soda to add
to their Ginger Beer. You could probably freeze those too. I think they are available in all Bi-Lo
and Coles. I find LA Ice to be the best of the diet colas, but it's all a matter of personal taste.

Cheers Alan, T2, Oz dx May 2002 , A1C 5.8, no meds, diet and not enough exercise.

--
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
 
J

Julie Bove

Guest
"Nev." <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> In the centre of the universe where I live it is mid summer, and I would love to be able to eat
> lovely cold, sweet ice blocks just like pre diabetic times.
>
> Does anyone know of any very low sugar ice blocks?
>
> I have been thinking of taking some diet cordial, i.e. .5% sugar, adding some equal or splenda,
> and maybe gelatine, and trying that.
>
> Has anybody in this news group got a low -> zero sugar recipe for ice blocks that works?

Not sure where you live or what an ice block is. In the US, we have sugar free Popsicles and ice
pops. You do have to check the carb count though. Even though they are sugar free, they do contain a
few carbs, and some more than others. Some also contain the dreaded sugar alcohols.

You can make your own frozen pops by using any type of sugar free drink. Either buy molds to make
them in, or use paper cups and use wooden sticks or plastic spoons as handles. If using this method,
wait until the pops are partially frozen and then insert the sticks so they stay in there straight.

I have a snow cone maker. Actually, I have two. I bought a used, cheap crank model. Works fine, but
it's a lot of effort if you want to make a lot of them. And between my husband, daughter, and the
neighborhood kids, it gets a lot of use. So I waited for a good sale and bought and electric model.
Now I can get shaved ice in an instant! I also bought one for my brother's birthday, which was
yesterday. Got a really bargain price on his since it is winter here. There are many different
brands of sugar free syrup you can buy. They are usually sweetened with either Splenda or Aspartame.
I buy mine online either at places that sell syrups for flavored coffee or making your own soda at
home, or at places that sell syrup for snow cones. You can also make your own syrup using an
unsweetened powdered drink mix and adding your own sweetener. The trick is to not add as much water
as you would for making a drink. You need the flavor to be more concentrated.

--
Type 2 http://users.bestweb.net/~jbove/
 
N

Nev.

Guest
At the moment I am experimenting in parallel with a fruit drink and a fruit ice block.

For the fruit drink, I am experimenting with mixing a diet fruit crush cordial with a sugar content
of 0.2% with a fruit juice, say orange, that is diluted 1 in 4 or 5 parts of water and then has the
sweetness added back in with splenda or whatever. This may give, hopefully, a much stronger fruit
taste with a much lower sugar level.

The ice block will follow similar principles.

Golden Circle, in Brisbane, has three very nice diet drinks, orange-mango, orange-passionfruit and
lemon-lime. The rumour is that Coca-Cola may be going to take them over.

I will probably look around to see if I can find some information on the snow cone maker Julie
mentioned.

Nev.

"Alan" wrote ...
>
> I do the following for a cool drink. Juice enough citrus (orange, lime, lemon, "lemonade",
> shaddock, whatever) to fill an ice-cube tray. Freeze. Add one or two cubes to a 1.25 litre diet
> lemonade or cola; or add a cube to a glass before serving. Preferrably use the cheap "home" brands
> for this.
 
O

Ozgirl

Guest
"Nev." <[email protected]> wrote in
message
news:[email protected]...
> At the moment I am experimenting in parallel with a
fruit
> drink and a fruit ice block.

I like diet coke or diet lemonade and now Saxby's have a new range of diet soft drinks as well as
their diet ginger beer - creaming soda, a pineapple one and one other I forget. I prefer soft drink
ice blocks to cordial myself.
 
N

Nev.

Guest
The way I am mixing the cordial and the orange juice, the orange juice is the dominant taste, not
the cordial.

Nev.

"Ozgirl" wrote ...
>
I prefer soft drink ice blocks to cordial myself.