Ideas For Checking For Cars Approaching From Behind?



dhk2

Well-Known Member
Aug 8, 2006
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Sunflogun said:
Yeah, my first impression is that the ones that suggest mirrors don't really ride a bike because it's a non-necessity and something that it's just in the way, lol, bikes with mirrors! :D
First impressions are often wrong. I'll wager I've got a lot more years and miles on two-wheels than you do. But I do agree it's a "non-necessity", just like the helmet, gloves and bright flashing daytime light I ride with every time I'm on the road. Why would anyone ride with all that ****?
 

Corzhens

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May 26, 2015
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When I bought an easy rider bike way way back long time ago, I had it fitted with a handle mirror so I would see behind me. But bikes now don't have that so what I do is play it by ear. If I hear something behind me then I glance. Unfortunately this play by ear doesn't work with other bikes because a bicycle has no motor sound.
 

Sunflogun

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Apr 20, 2015
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mpre53 said:
I can see it for people with back or neck issues, who have difficulty turning their head far enough for a good look behind them.
I am not sure if you are serious or joking haha, a person with back or neck issues riding a bike? :D
 

oldbobcat

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Aug 31, 2003
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Sunflogun said:
I am not sure if you are serious or joking haha, a person with back or neck issues riding a bike? :D
Lots of riders I know have back and neck problems. Most of them are at least 40.

It's funny, though. In swimming and running, two speed and endurance sports that come to mind, participants will go to great measures to correct structural problems--physical therapy, deep-tissue massage, yoga, stretching, weight training, chiropractic. Cyclists would rather buy stuff to compensate for their infirmities.

Not that I recommend against using a mirror. If it works for you, great. Just don't tell me you like to use it while listening to tunes on your smart phone.
 

BikeBikeBikeBike

Well-Known Member
May 19, 2015
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With the addition of bike commuting I am adding a bike helmet mirror to my gear tomorrow. I actually forgot about them until I read this post. I hate having to constantly check for vehicles, yes ears work but if it's windy or if you want to know how many cars are coming you need a visual. I can imagine they are probably a lot more stable than a bar mounted one.
 

Sunflogun

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Apr 20, 2015
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oldbobcat said:
Lots of riders I know have back and neck problems. Most of them are at least 40.

It's funny, though. In swimming and running, two speed and endurance sports that come to mind, participants will go to great measures to correct structural problems--physical therapy, deep-tissue massage, yoga, stretching, weight training, chiropractic. Cyclists would rather buy stuff to compensate for their infirmities.

Not that I recommend against using a mirror. If it works for you, great. Just don't tell me you like to use it while listening to tunes on your smart phone.
I prefer to use all my senses, so no mirrors and music as I ride. Swimming is great to correct posture and body issues, as for running, I think it's as aggressive to the body as cycling.
 

kylerlittle

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Apr 25, 2015
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Sunflogun said:
I prefer to use all my senses, so no mirrors and music as I ride. Swimming is great to correct posture and body issues, as for running, I think it's as aggressive to the body as cycling.
That's the best way to go, that's very smart I salute you.
 

mpre53

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Feb 20, 2013
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Sunflogun said:
I am not sure if you are serious or joking haha, a person with back or neck issues riding a bike? :D
A good fitter can work wonders to allow people with neck/back/shoulder problems to ride comfortably.

And if all else fails---get a recumbent. :D
 

oldbobcat

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Aug 31, 2003
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Sunflogun said:
I prefer to use all my senses, so no mirrors and music as I ride. Swimming is great to correct posture and body issues, as for running, I think it's as aggressive to the body as cycling.
My experience with swimming, as a teenager, resulted in hyperextended knees, poor foot strength, and a deeply S-curved spine (head forward, upper back back with the shoulders curled forward, hips forward). When I was 13 I developed a debilitating back injury that my family doctor could not diagnose. Through the secret sports network we finally found a massage therapist who found the problem and got me on a program to get back on my feet and into the water. This was in 1965, a time when alternative therapies were truly underground.

Swimming and biking don't develop the load bearing tissue as "feet-on-the-ground" activities do. These days, while biking is my main activity, I swim when I have access to water, and I run for foot strength and posture. And if I'm feeling a persistent or recurring injury, I see a professional.

The goal of most fitters who work in shops is to get their clients riding comfortably and quickly on their new bikes--whatever it takes. Rarely have I heard a fitter say, "Your lack of flexibility (or core strength, or foot strength, or weight control, or sound posture) is interfering with your ability to be comfortable on your bike."
 

Sunflogun

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Apr 20, 2015
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Now I am impressed with all the sports you do bobcat! I wish I could work often to be fit, I guess I am just too lazy to make a decent preparation for myself. I suppose if my workout was too demanding I would need to focus more on my overall fitness.
 

superbobby

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May 29, 2015
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I remember when I had a stiff neck and rode my bike for a short spin. Made me buy mirrors afterwards.
 

Sunflogun

Active Member
Apr 20, 2015
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Seriously? How long did you have a stick neck for superbobby? It had to be a really long time to make you get those mirrors. :)
 

Damien Lee

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May 16, 2015
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Well, I simply always try to be attentive as possible when I'm cycling. Always try to hear if any cars are coming from behind. But since many modern cars have quieter engines, this is becoming more challenging. Fortunately I've got 20/20 vision and therefore only need to tilt my head about 30 degrees either way to spot a car from behind. However, it's harder to spot incoming cars while wearing glasses in which case I have to tilt my head even further.
 

Sunflogun

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Apr 20, 2015
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That's what most bikers do, we just listen and watch, not more much science to it.
 

MattyX

New Member
Jun 6, 2015
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When I purchased my first road bike 3 years ago, I bought a Bike-Eye frame mounted mirror. It has been on my bike since the day I got it. A quick look down and I get a rear-side view between my left leg and the frame of my bike. If it broke tomorrow I would buy another one immediately. I like to check on approaching cars as well as keep track of other cyclists during group rides.
 

Uawadall

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Jun 14, 2015
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Like many posted already, use ears as a valuable tool and make sure not to use headphones. In less dense areas, I can hear a car coming from a mile away. In heavy traffic areas, I assume there is always a car behind me and I'll either make sure to be closer to the center of the lane before a turn or cautiously merge otherwise.