Ideas for my end to vegetarianism

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Leadfoot, Mar 14, 2004.

  1. Leadfoot

    Leadfoot Guest

    I have been a vegetarian for over 10 years. I have forgotten
    what "meat" tastes like, however my body has been craving it
    for nearly a year. I decide it is time to put an end to it.
    I will see however that I am still somewhat nervous over the
    madcow(no flames), so I am looking for either lamb or bison
    to include in my diet. I do believe both of those do not
    suffer from "mad cow". I can not decide between a good rack
    of lamb or a bison steak to end my streak. Comments?
     
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  2. Laura

    Laura Guest

    I would think something lighter, like chicken or perhaps
    another poultry would be more pleasing to your palate...no?

    --
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    GAYLAN FOR PRESIDENT

    I am a proud member of the bloodletting aspartame silicone
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    multiple sclerosis fiboromylagia vaccination reunion
    committee and survivors group. <troll
    trap>

    "Leadfoot" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:N375c.-
    [email protected]
    > I have been a vegetarian for over 10 years. I have
    > forgotten what "meat" tastes like, however my body has
    > been craving it for nearly a year. I
    decide
    > it is time to put an end to it. I will see however that I
    > am still
    somewhat
    > nervous over the madcow(no flames), so I am looking for
    > either lamb or
    bison
    > to include in my diet. I do believe both of those do not
    > suffer from "mad cow". I can not decide between a good
    > rack of lamb or a bison steak to end my streak. Comments?
     
  3. Mark Thorson

    Mark Thorson Guest

    Leadfoot wrote:

    > I have been a vegetarian for over 10 years. I have
    > forgotten what "meat" tastes like, however my body has
    > been craving it for nearly a year. I decide it is time to
    > put an end to it. I will see however that I am still
    > somewhat nervous over the madcow(no flames), so I am
    > looking for either lamb or bison to include in my diet. I
    > do believe both of those do not suffer from "mad cow". I
    > can not decide between a good rack of lamb or a bison
    > steak to end my streak. Comments?

    Are you nuts? It was transmission of the lamb disease
    scrapie to cattle which is believed to have started the
    whole Mad Cow epidemic in Britain.

    Either look for organically grown beef, or perhaps consider
    some nice pork. Bacon is my favorite meat. Of all the things
    I pity the observant Jew for missing, bacon is number one on
    the list. Imagine going through an entire lifetime without
    eating bacon! That would be like never knowing what
    chocolate is like! There's just no substitute for either
    one! (And yes, I've tried beef bacon -- it's good, but it's
    not bacon, no more than carob can be considered a substitute
    for chocolate!)
     
  4. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 00:48:45 GMT, "Leadfoot" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I have been a vegetarian for over 10 years. I have
    >forgotten what "meat" tastes like, however my body has been
    >craving it for nearly a year. I decide it is time to put an
    >end to it. I will see however that I am still somewhat
    >nervous over the madcow(no flames), so I am looking for
    >either lamb or bison to include in my diet. I do believe
    >both of those do not suffer from "mad cow". I can not
    >decide between a good rack of lamb or a bison steak to end
    >my streak. Comments?

    Go out to a nice restaurant and get yourself the 22oz cut of
    Prime Rib with au jus and horseradish sauce.

    -sw
     
  5. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Steve Wertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 00:48:45 GMT, "Leadfoot"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >I have been a vegetarian for over 10 years. I have
    > >forgotten what "meat" tastes like, however my body has
    > >been craving it for nearly a year. I decide it is time to
    > >put an end to it. I will see however that I am still
    > >somewhat nervous over the madcow(no flames), so I am
    > >looking for either lamb or bison to include in my diet. I
    > >do believe both of those do not suffer from "mad cow". I
    > >can not decide between a good rack of lamb or a bison
    > >steak to end my streak. Comments?
    >
    > Go out to a nice restaurant and get yourself the 22oz cut
    > of Prime Rib with au jus and horseradish sauce.
    >
    > -sw
    >

    Hold the horse radish sauce and add butter to
    that....... ;-d

    And make sure it's bloody rare!

    K.

    --
    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<
    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems-
    &include=0&userid=katra
     
  6. Alex Rast

    Alex Rast Guest

    at Mon, 15 Mar 2004 00:48:45 GMT in
    <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    (Leadfoot) wrote :

    >I have been a vegetarian for over 10 years. I have
    >forgotten what "meat" tastes like, however my body has been
    >craving it for nearly a year. I decide it is time to put an
    >end to it. I will see however that I am still somewhat
    >nervous over the madcow(no flames), so I am looking for
    >either lamb or bison to include in my diet. I do believe
    >both of those do not suffer from "mad cow". I can not
    >decide between a good rack of lamb or a bison steak to end
    >my streak. Comments?

    Neither of these is "safe" in that aspect, given that mad
    cow disease originated with scrapie in sheep (which is, in
    fact, more common) and bison could just as easily be raised,
    fed, and processed the same way cows are, and in fact,
    probably some of them *have* been produced under similarly
    shockingly unethical and unsafe conditions as the worst
    abuses of the beef industry that led to Mad Cow.

    Most cattle are, however, not raised or processed in manners
    that would really lead to Mad Cow, so if you get a high-
    quality piece of beef (i.e. not the cheapest brand or store
    in your area), you're probably pretty safe.

    IME most vegetarians get particularly repulsed by poultry,
    so I would ignore chicken or turkey. Meats with a very
    strong, distinctive flavour are also usually not well
    recieved, and that suggests leaning away from lamb, venison,
    etc. The 2 choices left are beef and pork. Now, if you can
    find pork that's not the ultra-lean variety, it's good, but
    if not, most likely your experience will be unsatisfactory.
    (Most pork sold these days is far too lean). Among pork
    cuts, I like Country Style Spare Ribs, which are adaptable
    and delicious (these are meaty ribs with a relative minimum
    of bone, not the mostly-bone "baby back" ribs. If you opt
    for beef, you can be 100% safe if you get an organic beef -
    it's worth searching for, especially if you're a converting
    vegetarian. And for your first taste, it's worth going for
    the top-of-the-line: tenderloin, which is the perfect choice
    because it's a superb cut of beef that also happens to be
    mild in flavour. This is the meat that tends to have the
    best success ratio among vegetarians. I like to roast a
    whole tenderloin (about 5 lb) for 35 minutes at 425F.
    However, this may be a bit of a risk (you'll be spending
    upwards of $50, probably more like $100, for something you
    might not like) so it could be safer to start with a steak.
    Doing a tenderloin as a steak is IMHO perhaps not as good as
    a roast, but it's still perfectly good.

    --
    Alex Rast [email protected] (remove d., .7,
    not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
     
  7. Kalanamak

    Kalanamak Guest

    Leadfoot wrote:
    > Comments?

    I've known two men whom I roomie'd with, and they ate my
    veggie food (I cooked, they cleaned up). After a few months
    of this, one (this was years before the other) went home to
    mama and had oxtail stew, the other ate steak, and both
    were up all night in pain. I advise starting alittle more
    slowly. It is only a sample of two, but it doesn't surprize
    me. blacksalt
     
  8. On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 00:48:45 GMT, "Leadfoot" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I have been a vegetarian for over 10 years. I have
    >forgotten what "meat" tastes like, however my body has been
    >craving it for nearly a year. I decide it is time to put an
    >end to it. I will see however that I am still somewhat
    >nervous over the madcow(no flames), so I am looking for
    >either lamb or bison to include in my diet. I do believe
    >both of those do not suffer from "mad cow". I can not
    >decide between a good rack of lamb or a bison steak to end
    >my streak. Comments?
    >
    I think one or two lamb chops, not overcooked, might be
    plenty. We had beautiful bison tenderloin steaks at New
    Years. Very tasty but bigger than I would want after a long
    time without meat.

    Another possibility is a braised lamb shank.


    Rodney Myrvaagnes J36 Gjo/a

    Smoking in a bar is like peeing in a punchbowl.
     
  9. Snudle

    Snudle Guest

    You have a better chance of being hit by lightning in your
    house while on the phone than getting a piece of meat with
    madcow disease. I would not worry about it. If you really
    want some meat, try a simple dish with only a little meat in
    it like pork, or chicken, loa mein just ask for no MSG. See
    if that takes care of your craving.

    "Leadfoot" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:N375c.-
    [email protected]
    > I have been a vegetarian for over 10 years. I have
    > forgotten what "meat" tastes like, however my body has
    > been craving it for nearly a year. I
    decide
    > it is time to put an end to it. I will see however that I
    > am still
    somewhat
    > nervous over the madcow(no flames), so I am looking for
    > either lamb or
    bison
    > to include in my diet. I do believe both of those do not
    > suffer from "mad cow". I can not decide between a good
    > rack of lamb or a bison steak to end my streak. Comments?
     
  10. "Leadfoot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have been a vegetarian for over 10 years. I have
    > forgotten what "meat" tastes like, however my body has
    > been craving it for nearly a year. I
    decide
    > it is time to put an end to it. I will see however that I
    > am still
    somewhat
    > nervous over the madcow(no flames), so I am looking for
    > either lamb or
    bison
    > to include in my diet. I do believe both of those do not
    > suffer from "mad cow". I can not decide between a good
    > rack of lamb or a bison steak to end my streak. Comments?

    I was a vegetarian for several years. The last year or so I
    was tormented by desire for pork. I ate Alan Zelt's pulled
    pork for my first public meat meal. Privately, I had eaten
    pork chops a few times. I still limit my meat intake but do
    eat a small amount - mostly pork.

    Charlie
     
  11. EskWIRED

    EskWIRED Guest

    In rec.food.cooking, Leadfoot <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I have been a vegetarian for over 10 years. I have
    > forgotten what "meat" tastes like, however my body has
    > been craving it for nearly a year. I decide it is time to
    > put an end to it. I will see however that I am still
    > somewhat nervous over the madcow(no flames), so I am
    > looking for either lamb or bison to include in my diet. I
    > do believe both of those do not suffer from "mad cow". I
    > can not decide between a good rack of lamb or a bison
    > steak to end my streak. Comments?

    Forget the Bison.

    Have some loin pork chops, grilled over hardwood embers.

    --
    ...I'm an air-conditioned gypsy...

    - The Who
     
  12. On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 00:48:45 GMT, Leadfoot wrote:

    > either lamb or bison to include in my diet. I do believe
    > both of those do not suffer from "mad cow".

    Never heard of scrapie ?

    Also: from:http://www.oie.int/eng/maladies/fiches/a_B115.htm
    HOSTS Bovidae (domestic cattle, nyala [Tragelaphus angasi],
    greater kudu [Tragelaphus strepsiceros] and presumed similar
    origin for cases in gemsbok [Oryx gazella], Arabian oryx
    [Oryx leucoryx], eland [Taurotragus oryx], scimitar-horned
    oryx [Oryx dammah] and bison [Bison bison]).
    --
    Tim.

    If the human brain were simple enough that we could
    understand it, we would be so simple that we couldn't.
     
  13. Mark Thorson

    Mark Thorson Guest

    Alex Rast wrote:

    > Doing a tenderloin as a steak is IMHO perhaps not as good
    > as a roast, but it's still perfectly good.

    A quick way to do a small rare tenderloin steak is to hold
    it with tongs over a burner of a gas stove. Develops a
    really good flavor that way, but makes a mess of the burner.
     
  14. moe

    moe Guest

    Neither of these is "safe" in that aspect, given that mad
    cow disease
    : originated with scrapie in sheep (which is, in fact, more
    : common) and bison could just as easily be raised, fed, and
    : processed the same way cows are, and in fact, probably
    : some of them *have* been produced under similarly
    : shockingly unethical and unsafe conditions as the worst
    : abuses of the beef industry that led to Mad Cow.

    No, Mad Cow disease did _NOT_ originate with scrapie as was
    first thought. Mad Cow disease is caused by prions, and is
    not a bacteria or virus.
     
  15. stan

    stan Guest

    Leadfoot <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I have been a vegetarian for over 10 years. I have
    > forgotten what "meat" tastes like, however my body has
    > been craving it for nearly a year. I decide it is time to
    > put an end to it. I will see however that I am still
    > somewhat nervous over the madcow(no flames), so I am
    > looking for either lamb or bison to include in my diet. I
    > do believe both of those do not suffer from "mad cow". I
    > can not decide between a good rack of lamb or a bison
    > steak to end my streak. Comments?

    Flip a coin. You can't go wrong either way. Also, why not
    consider a pork product? How about starting out your first
    day in ten years as a carnivore with a nice bacon and egg
    breakfast?
     
  16. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] wrote:

    > Leadfoot <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > I have been a vegetarian for over 10 years. I have
    > > forgotten what "meat" tastes like, however my body has
    > > been craving it for nearly a year. I decide it is time
    > > to put an end to it. I will see however that I am still
    > > somewhat nervous over the madcow(no flames), so I am
    > > looking for either lamb or bison to include in my diet.
    > > I do believe both of those do not suffer from "mad cow".
    > > I can not decide between a good rack of lamb or a bison
    > > steak to end my streak. Comments?
    >
    > Flip a coin. You can't go wrong either way. Also, why not
    > consider a pork product? How about starting out your first
    > day in ten years as a carnivore with a nice bacon and egg
    > breakfast?
    >

    I second the pork idea. Why not a pork roast? Purchase a
    nice boneless one, slice small holes into it, and press
    garlic cloves into the holes. Salt the roast well, add
    sprigs of fresh rosemary pressed against it, and roast.

    Oh, my.

    --
    Nancy Howells (don't forget to switch it, and replace the ;)
    to send mail).
     
  17. Barry Grau

    Barry Grau Guest

    Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > Either look for organically grown beef, or perhaps
    > consider some nice pork. Bacon is my favorite meat. Of all
    > the things I pity the observant Jew for missing, bacon is
    > number one on the list. Imagine going through an entire
    > lifetime without eating bacon! That would be like never
    > knowing what chocolate is like! There's just no substitute
    > for either one! (And yes, I've tried beef bacon -- it's
    > good, but it's not bacon, no more than carob can be
    > considered a substitute for chocolate!)

    Speaking of observant Jews and bacon, back when I was in
    grade school (in an orthodox Jewish yeshiva), carob pods
    were among the "treats" that were passed out on Jewish arbor
    day (tu b'Shvat). Raisins and nuts were the others. Carob
    pods are vile stuff.

    -bwg Who still remembers his first bacon cheeseburger.
     
  18. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Steve Wertz
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 00:48:45 GMT, "Leadfoot"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >I have been a vegetarian for over 10 years. I have
    > >forgotten what "meat" tastes like, however my body has
    > >been craving it for nearly a year. I decide it is time to
    > >put an end to it. I will see however that I am still
    > >somewhat nervous over the madcow(no flames), so I am
    > >looking for either lamb or bison to include in my diet. I
    > >do believe both of those do not suffer from "mad cow". I
    > >can not decide between a good rack of lamb or a bison
    > >steak to end my streak. Comments?

    > Go out to a nice restaurant and get yourself the 22oz cut
    > of Prime Rib with au jus and horseradish sauce.

    Bad idea. I've heard from lots of people (besides kalanamak)
    that former vegies who eat a big serving of meat get bad
    indigestion and wish they hadn't. Get the petite filet and
    take half home to make a sandwich the next day.

    --
    Dan Abel Sonoma State University AIS [email protected]
     
  19. On 16 Mar 2004 00:21:01 GMT, [email protected] (Mpoconnor7)
    wrote:

    >>> Go out to a nice restaurant and get yourself the 22oz
    >>> cut of Prime Rib with au jus and horseradish sauce.
    >
    >I can't stand horseradish sauce. I have found that I prefer
    >Sour Cream as a dip for Prime Rib.
    >
    >I would start small with the meat portion and work your way
    >up. Your body will not be used to eating meat and if you
    >tried to eat a large piece of meat it would make you sick.
    >I would start with something simple like a some browned
    >hamburger meat or a tuna fish sandwich.
    >
    You might just want to stay with small meat portions. They
    don't need to be the whole meal.

    Another easy start: Start boiling some pasta in salted
    water. take a piece of raw salmon, about 2-3 oz for one
    serving of pasta. Slice the salmon thin, less than 1/4
    inch. When the pasta is al dente, pour it into a strainer
    over a bowl, so the hot water heats the bowl. Pour out the
    water and toss the salmon and the pasta together in the
    bowl. The heat of the pasta will cook the salmon as much as
    it wants to be.

    Eat it with a salad.

    You can elaborate this by cooking minced garlic in oil, and
    tossing that along with the pasta and salmon.

    You can spring for a really good pasta, and for two ounces
    you can also think of springing for wild salmon. Still an
    inexpensive meal.

    Rodney Myrvaagnes J36 Gjo/a

    Smoking in a bar is like peeing in a punchbowl.
     
  20. "Leadfoot" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have been a vegetarian for over 10 years. I have
    > forgotten what "meat" tastes like, however my body has
    > been craving it for nearly a year. I
    decide
    > it is time to put an end to it. I will see however that I
    > am still
    somewhat
    > nervous over the madcow(no flames), so I am looking for
    > either lamb or
    bison
    > to include in my diet. I do believe both of those do not
    > suffer from "mad cow". I can not decide between a good
    > rack of lamb or a bison steak to end my streak. Comments?
    >
    >
    >

    Something wrong with pork?

    Jack Puercophile
     
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