Ideas Needed - Office Bike Storage

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Arthur Shapiro, May 9, 2003.

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  1. There's some office consolidation going on here, and as a result I'm going to lose the nice office
    I've had for the last fifteen years. I'm being moved into a much smaller "soft" office - meaning not
    a cubicle (thank goodness) but a prefabricated creation with walls and doors, and the furniture hung
    from the wall by means of appropriate brackets and the like that slip into perforated areas between
    the panels that make up the toom. We Are Not Amused.

    The trauma is compounded by the fact that there's no bloody way to fit a bicycle into this office
    other than diagonally, whereupon one couldn't really use the office.

    So my most pressing issue is how to store the Habanero, and presumably that means vertically. I
    have one initial idea which I'll throw out for comments as to whether there's something better
    I might do.

    Since I can mount brackets into the wall at reasonably quantized intervals, my thought is to mount
    one, to which I attach two short ropes, dangling with hooks at the end. Those hooks will hold the
    Habby's handlebars with the rear wheel just touching the ground. It will be taut enough such that
    the bike can't wheel backwards and will be held more-or-less vertically against that wall.

    Does this sound reasonable?

    Art
     
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  2. Murray

    Murray Guest

    If you are able to "hang" the bike, a single screw in large, plastic coated hook would do the job..
    Just hang from the front wheel at a height where the rear wheel will slide into the wall.. It does
    not bear much of the weight, just keeps it centred without all the ropes and such... I have a
    colleague who stores several this way in a very small space.. As long as you do not bear the full
    weight of the bike on the hook, I do not think that the structural integrity of the wheel would
    become an issue.. good luck in the downsize.. Murray

    On Fri, 09 May 2003 22:39:17 GMT, [email protected] (Arthur Shapiro) wrote:

    >There's some office consolidation going on here, and as a result I'm going to lose the nice office
    >I've had for the last fifteen years. I'm being moved into a much smaller "soft" office - meaning
    >not a cubicle (thank goodness) but a prefabricated creation with walls and doors, and the furniture
    >hung from the wall by means of appropriate brackets and the like that slip into perforated areas
    >between the panels that make up the toom. We Are Not Amused.
    >
    >The trauma is compounded by the fact that there's no bloody way to fit a bicycle into this office
    >other than diagonally, whereupon one couldn't really use the office.
    >
    >So my most pressing issue is how to store the Habanero, and presumably that means vertically. I
    >have one initial idea which I'll throw out for comments as to whether there's something better I
    >might do.
    >
    >Since I can mount brackets into the wall at reasonably quantized intervals, my thought is to mount
    >one, to which I attach two short ropes, dangling with hooks at the end. Those hooks will hold the
    >Habby's handlebars with the rear wheel just touching the ground. It will be taut enough such that
    >the bike can't wheel backwards and will be held more-or-less vertically against that wall.
    >
    >Does this sound reasonable?
    >
    >Art
     
  3. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

  4. Buck

    Buck Guest

    "Murray" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > If you are able to "hang" the bike, a single screw in large, plastic coated hook would do the
    > job.. Just hang from the front wheel at a height where the rear wheel will slide into the wall..
    > It does not bear much of the weight, just keeps it centred without all the ropes and such... I
    > have a colleague who stores several this way in a very small space.. As long as you do not bear
    > the full weight of the bike on the hook, I do not think that the structural integrity of the wheel
    > would become an issue.. good luck in the downsize.. Murray

    The structural integrity of the wheel still isn't an issue even if the entire weight of the bike is
    held by a hook (I have about 5 hanging in just this manner). If you can't trust the wheel to hold
    the weight of the bike, then how on earth could you trust it to hold the weight of the bike and you?

    -Buck
     
  5. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

    Art:

    Is it possible to hang the bike upside down from the ceiling?

    Jon Isaacs
     
  6. Baka Dasai

    Baka Dasai Guest

    On Fri, 09 May 2003 18:19:42 -0700, Zoot Katz said (and I quote):
    >
    > http://www.fogdog.com/product/index.jsp?productId=966705

    This looks small and cheap, which I like. But how does it work? Is there a picture of one with a
    bike on it?
    --
    "Naturally, the common people don't want war. But, after all, it is the leaders of a country who
    determine policy, and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along. All you have to do is
    tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the peacemakers for lack of patriotism and exposing
    the country to danger. It works the same in any country."
    - Hermann Goering
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >On Fri, 09 May 2003 18:19:42 -0700, Zoot Katz said (and I quote):
    >>
    >> http://www.fogdog.com/product/index.jsp?productId=966705
    >
    >This looks small and cheap, which I like. But how does it work? Is there a picture of one with a
    >bike on it?

    You mount it on the wall. Then the hooked end goes between your spokes and holds your bike by the
    wheel, front or rear. You could even thread a cable lock through to secure your bike.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
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