Identify edible root

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by White Monkey, Nov 24, 2005.

  1. White Monkey

    White Monkey Guest

    Hi all,

    I just interrupted the landlord's father cleaning up our garden (we just
    moved, and I was going out to tell him we'd clean up, but he said he wants
    to remove stuff that he left here--he lives next door). I said I'd be
    growing veggies in the spring in the area under the apple tree, and he said
    great, but watch out for these! and pulled out some roots that look a great
    deal like ginger or galangal but are not. The smell is not at all spicy or
    exotic, the skin is sandy-colored, the flesh white. There are no dangly
    roots at all. He said they are to be sliced and eaten as is and that they
    taste like a cross between potatoes and apples. He said there are a ton of
    them there and to not throw them away or something when I do the garden. If
    you folks could give me some suggestions of things I might look up to see if
    the picture matches what I've got here, I'd appreciate it. Oh, I am in the
    Netherlands, but he said they're not originally native here.

    Thanks,
    Katrina
     
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  2. Shaun aRe

    Shaun aRe Guest

    "White Monkey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I just interrupted the landlord's father cleaning up our garden (we just
    > moved, and I was going out to tell him we'd clean up, but he said he wants
    > to remove stuff that he left here--he lives next door). I said I'd be
    > growing veggies in the spring in the area under the apple tree, and he

    said
    > great, but watch out for these! and pulled out some roots that look a

    great
    > deal like ginger or galangal but are not. The smell is not at all spicy or
    > exotic, the skin is sandy-colored, the flesh white. There are no dangly
    > roots at all. He said they are to be sliced and eaten as is and that they
    > taste like a cross between potatoes and apples. He said there are a ton of
    > them there and to not throw them away or something when I do the garden.

    If
    > you folks could give me some suggestions of things I might look up to see

    if
    > the picture matches what I've got here, I'd appreciate it. Oh, I am in the
    > Netherlands, but he said they're not originally native here.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Katrina


    Do you have a photo you can put on a site so we can look at it? Are these
    like 'hands', as ginger/galangal are, or are they just more like knobbly
    single fingers, like one you might snap off a hand of ginger? If the latter,
    I'd be thinking of something like Jerusalem artichoke - google for pictures,
    see if they look anything like what you have there. (I love these -
    delicious, but only had them a few times unfortunately).


    Shaun aRe
     
  3. White Monkey

    White Monkey Guest

    > Do you have a photo you can put on a site so we can look at it?

    I will once the camera gets unloaded later. I'll post when that happens.

    Are these
    > like 'hands', as ginger/galangal are, or are they just more like knobbly
    > single fingers, like one you might snap off a hand of ginger?


    Well, more like the latter, but he says that these are quite small because
    the landlady kept cutting the plants down so they didn't grow well last
    year. One has a bulbous projection like on ginger, so I could picture it
    growing into a "hand" eventually.

    >If the latter,
    > I'd be thinking of something like Jerusalem artichoke - Google for
    > pictures,
    > see if they look anything like what you have there. (I love these -
    > delicious, but only had them a few times unfortunately).
    > Shaun aRe



    Thanks! These are more elongated than the pictures I found when I followed
    your suggestion. Those appear kind of compact, these are longer like a
    ginger "finger". Could this just be a variation not shown in the pictures,
    do you suppose?

    I want to research this a bit before eating any because I'm breastfeeding a
    baby and some herbs or plants are not recommended during such a time.
    --Katrina
     
  4. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    White Monkey wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I just interrupted the landlord's father cleaning up our garden (we just
    > moved, and I was going out to tell him we'd clean up, but he said he wants
    > to remove stuff that he left here--he lives next door). I said I'd be
    > growing veggies in the spring in the area under the apple tree, and he said
    > great, but watch out for these! and pulled out some roots that look a great
    > deal like ginger or galangal but are not. The smell is not at all spicy or
    > exotic, the skin is sandy-colored, the flesh white. There are no dangly
    > roots at all. He said they are to be sliced and eaten as is and that they
    > taste like a cross between potatoes and apples. He said there are a ton of
    > them there and to not throw them away or something when I do the garden. If
    > you folks could give me some suggestions of things I might look up to seeif
    > the picture matches what I've got here, I'd appreciate it. Oh, I am in the
    > Netherlands, but he said they're not originally native here.


    Sounds like Jerusalem Artichokes/Sunchokes.

    Jerusalem artichoke
    This vegetable is not truly an artichoke but a variety of sunflower
    with a lumpy, brown-skinned tuber that often resembles a gingerroot.
    Contrary to what the name implies, this vegetable has nothing to do
    with Jerusalem but is derived instead from the Italian word for
    sunflower, girasole . Because of its confusing moniker, modern-day
    growers have begun to call Jerusalem artichokes sunchokes , which is
    how they're often labeled in the produce section of many markets. The
    white flesh of this vegetable is nutty, sweet and crunchy. Jerusalem
    artichokes are available from about October to March. Select those that
    are firm and fresh-looking and not soft or wrinkled. Store in a plastic
    bag in the refrigerator for up to a week. After that, they will begin
    to wither because of moisture loss. They may be peeled or, because the
    skin is very thin and quite nutritious, simply washed well before being
    used. Jerusalem artichokes can be eaten raw in salads or cooked by
    boiling or steaming and served as a side dish. They also make a
    delicious soup. Jerusalem artichokes are a good source of iron.

    © Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD
    LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.

    Sheldon
     
  5. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    White Monkey wrote:
    > > Do you have a photo you can put on a site so we can look at it?

    >
    > I will once the camera gets unloaded later. I'll post when that happens.
    >
    > Are these
    > > like 'hands', as ginger/galangal are, or are they just more like knobbly
    > > single fingers, like one you might snap off a hand of ginger?

    >
    > Well, more like the latter, but he says that these are quite small because
    > the landlady kept cutting the plants down so they didn't grow well last
    > year. One has a bulbous projection like on ginger, so I could picture it
    > growing into a "hand" eventually.
    >
    > >If the latter,
    > > I'd be thinking of something like Jerusalem artichoke - Google for
    > > pictures,
    > > see if they look anything like what you have there. (I love these -
    > > delicious, but only had them a few times unfortunately).
    > > Shaun aRe

    >
    >
    > Thanks! These are more elongated than the pictures I found when I followed
    > your suggestion. Those appear kind of compact, these are longer like a
    > ginger "finger". Could this just be a variation not shown in the pictures,
    > do you suppose?
    >
    > I want to research this a bit before eating any because I'm breastfeeding a
    > baby and some herbs or plants are not recommended during such a time.
    > --Katrina


    Oh, had I known when I posted about Jerusalem artichokes I would glady
    have offered my services to be your tester... I believe they're safe,
    but you can never be too careful, so why don't we make sure, okay? ;)

    Sheldon
     
  6. White Monkey

    White Monkey Guest

    >> I want to research this a bit before eating any because I'm breastfeeding
    >> a
    >> baby and some herbs or plants are not recommended during such a time.
    >> --Katrina

    >
    > Oh, had I known when I posted about Jerusalem artichokes I would glady
    > have offered my services to be your tester... I believe they're safe,
    > but you can never be too careful, so why don't we make sure, okay? ;)
    >
    > Sheldon




    Well, if you weigh less than 10 kilos and have an as-yet-not-fully-developed
    system of organs, it's not a bad idea.

    I'm looking into them being Jerusalem Artichokes. Next time I catch sight of
    the landlord's father I'll ask him if the plants, when they are above
    ground, have yellow flowers.
    --Katrina
     
  7. White Monkey wrote:
    >>Do you have a photo you can put on a site so we can look at it?

    >
    >
    > I will once the camera gets unloaded later. I'll post when that happens.
    >
    > Are these
    >
    >>like 'hands', as ginger/galangal are, or are they just more like knobbly
    >>single fingers, like one you might snap off a hand of ginger?

    >
    >
    > Well, more like the latter, but he says that these are quite small because
    > the landlady kept cutting the plants down so they didn't grow well last
    > year. One has a bulbous projection like on ginger, so I could picture it
    > growing into a "hand" eventually.
    >
    >
    >>If the latter,
    >>I'd be thinking of something like Jerusalem artichoke - Google for
    >>pictures,
    >>see if they look anything like what you have there. (I love these -
    >>delicious, but only had them a few times unfortunately).
    >>Shaun aRe

    >
    >
    >
    > Thanks! These are more elongated than the pictures I found when I followed
    > your suggestion. Those appear kind of compact, these are longer like a
    > ginger "finger". Could this just be a variation not shown in the pictures,
    > do you suppose?
    >
    > I want to research this a bit before eating any because I'm breastfeeding a
    > baby and some herbs or plants are not recommended during such a time.
    > --Katrina
    >
    >
    >



    Sounds like jerusakem artichokes. my mom has been trying to get rid of
    hers for years and years :)

    --

    saerah

    "Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
    disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
    -Baruch Spinoza

    "There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
    what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
    and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
    is another theory which states that this has already happened."
    -Douglas Adams
     
  8. Shaun aRe

    Shaun aRe Guest

    "White Monkey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > > Do you have a photo you can put on a site so we can look at it?

    >
    > I will once the camera gets unloaded later. I'll post when that happens.


    Great.

    > >If the latter,
    > > I'd be thinking of something like Jerusalem artichoke - Google for
    > > pictures,
    > > see if they look anything like what you have there. (I love these -
    > > delicious, but only had them a few times unfortunately).
    > > Shaun aRe

    >
    >
    > Thanks! These are more elongated than the pictures I found when I followed
    > your suggestion. Those appear kind of compact, these are longer like a
    > ginger "finger". Could this just be a variation not shown in the pictures,
    > do you suppose?


    I'm sorry - wouldn't pretend to suppose!

    > I want to research this a bit before eating any because I'm breastfeeding

    a
    > baby and some herbs or plants are not recommended during such a time.
    > --Katrina


    Well, you have me curious now. ',;~}~


    Shaun aRe
     
  9. White Monkey

    White Monkey Guest

  10. In article <[email protected]>,
    "White Monkey" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OK, there's a picture of 2 of these roots up at:
    >
    > http://www.xs4all.nl/~cooper17/katrina/Misc/Roots.jpg
    >
    >


    Looks like Ginger root to me.
    I grate it and use it in a variety of recipes.
    It adds a nice complement when combined with garlic.

    Could be sun chokes also.

    What does it smell/taste like like?

    Ginger would be pungent, rich, herb-like.

    Sun choke would be more like a potatoe, but slightly sweet.

    Those are my guesses. ;-)
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  11. White Monkey

    White Monkey Guest

    > Looks like Ginger root to me.
    > I grate it and use it in a variety of recipes.
    > It adds a nice complement when combined with garlic.


    Nope, I use ginger pretty much daily, and this isn't it. It has almost no
    smell at all, by the way.

    > Could be sun chokes also.


    This is the running current best theory.

    > What does it smell/taste like like?


    Smells just kind of fresh without any particular distinctive odor. Neoighbor
    says it tastes like a cross between a potato and an apple.

    Thanks,
    Katrina
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>,
    "White Monkey" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > Looks like Ginger root to me.
    > > I grate it and use it in a variety of recipes.
    > > It adds a nice complement when combined with garlic.

    >
    > Nope, I use ginger pretty much daily, and this isn't it. It has almost no
    > smell at all, by the way.
    >
    > > Could be sun chokes also.

    >
    > This is the running current best theory.
    >
    > > What does it smell/taste like like?

    >
    > Smells just kind of fresh without any particular distinctive odor. Neoighbor
    > says it tastes like a cross between a potato and an apple.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Katrina
    >
    >


    Ok, sounds like a sun choke then.

    Serve them sliced and steamed, or mashed.

    If they chase you out of the house with methane emmisions as the
    aftermath, you've got your root. <lol>

    The bloom looks like a sunflower when they grow.
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  13. sf

    sf Guest

    On Sat, 26 Nov 2005 16:37:26 -0600, OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

    >
    > If they chase you out of the house with methane emmisions as the
    > aftermath, you've got your root. <lol>



    Maybe it's YOUR system, missy. I've never experienced that when I eat
    them.
    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
  14. In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 26 Nov 2005 16:37:26 -0600, OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > If they chase you out of the house with methane emmisions as the
    > > aftermath, you've got your root. <lol>

    >
    >
    > Maybe it's YOUR system, missy. I've never experienced that when I eat
    > them.
    > --


    Okay. :)
    They just have that reputation......
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  15. MoM

    MoM Guest

    "White Monkey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >> Looks like Ginger root to me.
    >> I grate it and use it in a variety of recipes.
    >> It adds a nice complement when combined with garlic.

    >
    > Nope, I use ginger pretty much daily, and this isn't it.
    > It has almost no smell at all, by the way.
    >
    >> Could be sun chokes also.

    >
    > This is the running current best theory.
    >
    >> What does it smell/taste like like?

    >
    > Smells just kind of fresh without any particular
    > distinctive odor. Neoighbor says it tastes like a cross
    > between a potato and an apple.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Katrina

    That's a Sun choke or Jerusalem artichoke. Same thing just
    different names. I grew them.

    MoM
     
  16. MoM

    MoM Guest

    "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "White Monkey" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> > Looks like Ginger root to me.
    >> > I grate it and use it in a variety of recipes.
    >> > It adds a nice complement when combined with garlic.

    >>
    >> Nope, I use ginger pretty much daily, and this isn't it.
    >> It has almost no
    >> smell at all, by the way.
    >>
    >> > Could be sun chokes also.

    >>
    >> This is the running current best theory.
    >>
    >> > What does it smell/taste like like?

    >>
    >> Smells just kind of fresh without any particular
    >> distinctive odor. Neoighbor
    >> says it tastes like a cross between a potato and an
    >> apple.
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >> Katrina
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Ok, sounds like a sun choke then.
    >
    > Serve them sliced and steamed, or mashed.
    >
    > If they chase you out of the house with methane emmisions
    > as the
    > aftermath, you've got your root. <lol>
    >
    > The bloom looks like a sunflower when they grow.
    > --
    > Om.
    >
    > "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a
    > son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
    >

    Also, once you plant them they are very hard to eradicate
    and spread rapidly.

    MoM
     
  17. Shaun aRe

    Shaun aRe Guest

    "White Monkey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > > Looks like Ginger root to me.
    > > I grate it and use it in a variety of recipes.
    > > It adds a nice complement when combined with garlic.

    >
    > Nope, I use ginger pretty much daily, and this isn't it. It has almost no
    > smell at all, by the way.
    >
    > > Could be sun chokes also.

    >
    > This is the running current best theory.
    >
    > > What does it smell/taste like like?

    >
    > Smells just kind of fresh without any particular distinctive odor.

    Neoighbor
    > says it tastes like a cross between a potato and an apple.


    Yup - I'm still with the sun/J artichokes from seeing the picture! Lucky sod
    you ',;~}~




    Shaun aRe
     
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