If racing is the best form of training why not to train simulating races?

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by dot, Apr 28, 2003.

  1. dot

    dot New Member

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    It's not a question about road racing.
    My question is about mtb and cx only.
     
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  2. GearGrinder

    GearGrinder New Member

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    yes why not? i do. Its not quite the same but you can still push beyond your limits and improve alot.
     
  3. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

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    You have much more control over your development by training to race rather than racing to train.

    What I mean is that you can plan a single specific session to induce specific adaptations within the body. e.g. if you want to increase your lactate threshold or sprint do a session at LT or a sprint session. By doing simulated races you are placing a large amount of stress on the body but not stressing one system maximaly, therefore you do not get the maximum amount of adaptation in any system and get poor/no adaption all round.

    Some adaptations can only be acheived with efforts outside that normaly involved in a race. For example, VO2 max is in part limited by cardiac output and to improve cardiac output efforts at a range of intensities including those that induce maximum heart rate are needed. This effort is difficult to acheive and maintain with any quantity and quality to cause maximum improvements in cardiac output.

    Best to do specific training and racing to get quick on a bike.

    As we are talking about MTB, have you ever had to bunny hop a big log? This is a skill which is much better learned outside racing/stimulated racing. Once learned stimulated racing/racing can be used to develop your use of bunny hop under stress/in race conditions.
     
  4. dot

    dot New Member

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    I participate almost short races only (<1 hr) and I'm even not planning to train for longer races. Course profiles are like this: 1 min climb - 10 sec descent - 20 sec flat - 30 sec climb - 10 sec descent - 10 sec flat - 20 sec climb and so on.
    Almost no climbs longer than 1 min. Intensity of all my races is extremely high. avg HRs always higher than 180 (I estimate my LT as 172-174). So my simulations are at pace just below race pace (avg HR ~175) with short bursts over 185 bpm on the top of the climbs and simulations' length is as race length: 50-60 min.
    Also I do sprints on road on race pace days and endurance pace rides on moderate days.
    On intensive days I do 2-3 hrs on moderate days I do 1-1.5 hrs.
    3 intensive days a week, 2 moderate days, 2 days off. 8-10 hrs a week.
     
  5. CatSpin

    CatSpin New Member

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    Hope to hear more on this topic.

    I just started some race simulations as part of my Spinning Instruction. I, along with 20 others, had our first "race" of the season on the spin bike...we tore each other up chasing down attacks, launching ones, bridging etc. then a MHR sprint to the finish. My clients loved it. I, on the other hand, was concerned about "racing" in class, then for real on the weekend.
    Gear Grinder, do you do your "race" simulations often?

    Point taken 2LAP on the need to train specific "links" for your cycling profile, but would you advise against race simulations completely. If not, I would suppose you would use the "race" as one big interval at LT or even MHR. ???

    Dot, you started this thread. Through I am a road racer, I hope my questions (and feedback from other members) can be applied to your MTB training question also.

    CatSpin
     
  6. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

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    Cat Spin,

    I think races and race simulations have a very improtant part in all competitive cyclists training programs. In the past I have even got my riders to enter a race and attack every hill (good hill training) or stay in the bunch (good low intensity training). This prepares you for techniques and tacktics when your main event is on. It would be foolish to think that no practice would be good. This also applies to MTB racing.

    Using races you can use specific tactics to have a specific training effect as you have suggested CatSpin a long interval or a LT session. Cycling is very difficult as there are few opportunities to make mistakes, if you race 30 times a year, thats 29 mistakes and 1 win. Simulating races allows you to make and learn from more mistakes. Its also good fun.

    When you plan your race or simulated race, keep at the front of your mind the goal of the session. If its winning, go and race, but if its training ask yourself if there is a better alternative session.
     
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