If riding the streets of a large metro area

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Mulligan Al, May 28, 2006.

  1. Mulligan Al

    Mulligan Al New Member

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    should one consider purchasing a bike that is more durable? I like to go fast and would like a light fast carbon frame, but I often wonder if the high-end carbon frames can withstand the potholes, speed bumps and cracks in the road that are common in a major metro area.
     
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  2. Aussie Steve

    Aussie Steve New Member

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    I have 2 bikes, both Aluminium framed. My older bike has steel forks and is so damnded uncomfortable ...my newer one has Carbon fibre forks and soaks up bumps very well, so well that it is my preferred steed and my older bike has been untouched for about 8 months.... so I would say forget aluminium and go for expensive steel or carbon...
     
  3. tetsuryuu

    tetsuryuu New Member

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    Ultimately it's not frame material that determines the sturdiness/longevity of a frame, it's the construction technique and quality. You can buy cheap and heavier aluminum frames that will crack at their poorly welded joints, but you can also buy ultralight carbon frames that can really take a pounding without breaking.

    If you're going to be riding in a city, you might consider putting together a high-end cyclocross bike. You'll have a sturdy frame with a strong fork and wheelset without sacrificing much in the way of speed. If you do go this route, make sure that whatever frame/fork combo you go with has enough clearance for whatever size tires you want to use. Modern road bikes have very close seatstay and fork clearances, and are usually designed to be used with nothing larger than 700x23 or 700x25 tires.
     
  4. Mulligan Al

    Mulligan Al New Member

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    Darn tetsuryuu, you threw me a curve ball. After all the reading I've done on road bikes and mountain bikes I never heard of a cyclocross bike until now. I've been torn between a mountain bike (too ride with my family and to work) and a road bike (so I could join a metro riding club) and it seem that a cyclocross may fit both needs. Now I need to start researching cyclocross bike.
     
  5. VeloSpeed

    VeloSpeed New Member

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    I know the feeling. I've only recently got my road bike but I'm already thinking a cyclocross might be the bike to deal with all the riding I do. Don't think I could part with either of my other bikes though! Still, no harm in having three bikes ...just need a bigger garage!

    I'm tempted to build up a surly crosscheck but the specialized tricross looks quite nice too

    David
     
  6. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    NB. You should size the cyclocross frame ~1" (2-to-3+ cms) SMALLER than you would a road bike. If your road bike size preference is 56cm, for example, then you would want a 52-or-53 cm CX frame.

    The OTHER alternative, but it lacks any cool-factor with the in-crowd (do you care?), is a "hybrid" ...

    The current marketing of slightly higher-end "hybrids" is to refer to them as "flat-bar" bikes ... or, perhaps those should be considered CX bikes with flat bars since they will usually have clearance for large tires and/or fenders and cantilever brakes (or, at least cantilever brake bosses ... some may have v-brakes or disc brakes) -- the main difference is that the "flat bar" road bikes are closer to a CX bike and will usually NOT have a front suspension fork so they will be lighter (and again, more expensive) than a "hybrid" classified bike.

    The "flat bar" road bike will undoubtedly have 700x28 ROAD tires instead of 700x32 knobby CX tires OR 700x38-40 hybrid tires.

    CX bikes have limited off-road use ... unless you are already a skilled MTBer or CX rider.
     
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