If you think your bike was stolen outside Baker St. station...

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Jim Price, Jul 16, 2003.

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  1. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    I cycled down to the J.D.Wetherspoons over Baker St. station this evening to meet up with some
    friends. Outside the station, there is a steel railing which had three bicycles locked to it (one of
    them my friend's). I happened to walk outside just at the moment the third one was about to be
    removed by two men with a five foot long bolt cutter! When asked what was going on, they explained
    they were from London Underground, and that my friend's bike was now inside the station. The one
    they were about to cut off was a rather smart and new looking On-One Il Pompino. I persuaded them to
    give it a minute and went back in to the pub to try and alert the owner, via the manager, who duly
    asked almost everyone in the place if they owned a bike locked up outside. It turned out that my
    mates bike and the other bike had already been taken, and the On-One owner just got out in time to
    save his lock. The other two were not so lucky, although they did get their bikes back.

    The moral of the story - don't lock you bike to LU property, even if it isn't very well signposted
    as such. My friend is an ex-employee, so there may be an update as to whether he gets the cost of
    his destroyed lock back.

    --
    Jim Price

    http://www.jimprice.dsl.pipex.com

    Conscientious objection is hard work in an economic war.
     
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  2. Andymorris

    Andymorris Guest

    Jim Price wrote:
    > I cycled down to the J.D.Wetherspoons over Baker St. station this evening to meet up with some
    > friends. Outside the station, there is a steel railing which had three bicycles locked to it (one
    > of them my friend's). I happened to walk outside just at the moment the third one was about to be
    > removed by two men with a five foot long bolt cutter! When asked what was going on, they explained
    > they were from London Underground, and that my friend's bike was now inside the station. The one
    > they were about to cut off was a rather smart and new looking On-One Il Pompino. I persuaded them
    > to give it a minute and went back in to the pub to try and alert the owner, via the manager, who
    > duly asked almost everyone in the place if they owned a bike locked up outside. It turned out that
    > my mates bike and the other bike had already been taken, and the On-One owner just got out in time
    > to save his lock. The other two were not so lucky, although they did get their bikes back.
    >
    > The moral of the story - don't lock you bike to LU property, even if it isn't very well signposted
    > as such. My friend is an ex-employee, so there may be an update as to whether he gets the cost of
    > his destroyed lock back.

    Did they say why they were destroying people property?

    --
    Andy Morris

    AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

    Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
  3. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    AndyMorris wrote:
    > Jim Price wrote:
    >>The moral of the story - don't lock you bike to LU property, even if it isn't very well signposted
    >>as such. My friend is an ex-employee, so there may be an update as to whether he gets the cost of
    >>his destroyed lock back.

    > Did they say why they were destroying people property?

    Unfortunately, I was a little too busy trying to orchestrate saving what remained of other people's
    locks using tact and diplomacy to really get into discussion with them about that. (Plus I'm not
    going to argue with someone wielding five feet of steel without superior weapons). However, if my
    mate gets any feedback, I'll post it here. Don't hold your breath. Anyone who knows about the legal
    situation is welcome to comment, as the fence was the opposite side of the pavement to the
    underground station.

    --
    Jim Price

    http://www.jimprice.dsl.pipex.com

    Conscientious objection is hard work in an economic war.
     
  4. Sue

    Sue Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Jim Price <[email protected]> writes

    >the fence was the opposite side of the pavement to the underground station.
    >
    The fence and the ground it's on probably belong to the highway authority (in London is that the
    borough council?) Your best bet for finding out is to ask LU whether they're asserting the fence and
    land are theirs, and to prove it.

    --
    Sue ]|:))
     
  5. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    Sue wrote:
    > In message <[email protected]>, Jim Price <[email protected]> writes
    >
    >> the fence was the opposite side of the pavement to the underground station.
    >>
    > The fence and the ground it's on probably belong to the highway authority (in London is that the
    > borough council?) Your best bet for finding out is to ask LU whether they're asserting the fence
    > and land are theirs, and to prove it.

    Thanks, I will try and pesuade my friend to ask this of LU in his argument about the cut lock.

    --
    Jim Price

    http://www.jimprice.dsl.pipex.com

    Conscientious objection is hard work in an economic war.
     
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