I'm interested in taking up road biking



Kerl

New Member
Oct 11, 2004
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I have a few questions about road-biking in general though.

What kind of training does it entail? Will I need a lot of outside gym-work to supplement the riding, or ise it mostly riding coupled with light weight training?

Does anyone know a good LBS in Columbus, Ohio?

What starting equipment do I need? All I can think of is a bike and a helmet, but looking through the equipment forum on here has confused me.

What can I expect to pay for a beginning bike, and what should I look for in a beginning bike?
 

e_guevara

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Jul 15, 2004
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What kind of training does it entail? Will I need a lot of outside gym-work to supplement the riding, or ise it mostly riding coupled with light weight training?
RIDE, RIDE and RIDE some more. Some people would recommend weights to supplement your training, but I run and play soccer to supplement mine. It's important that go on your own pace and go slowly from there.
What starting equipment do I need? All I can think of is a bike and a helmet, but looking through the equipment forum on here has confused me.

What can I expect to pay for a beginning bike, and what should I look for in a beginning bike?
The basics: bike (of course), helmet, water bottles, a patch kit (or spare tube), frame pump.

You should take a look at the sticky topic on this subforum "Beginner's Guide to Getting Started".

Regarding bike prices, there are some as low as $250 going up to $3000 an up. There are no simple rules regarding bike choices - it can depend on what type of riding you plan to do (short term to long term), your preference on components (low, mid or high end), frame geometry, and so on...

For starters, most bikes around $400 are generally worth the money. Ask a friend who has experience to help you in your decision. In the end, choose the bike that you feel comfortable with.

HTH
 

Kerl

New Member
Oct 11, 2004
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e_guevara said:
RIDE, RIDE and RIDE some more. Some people would recommend weights to supplement your training, but I run and play soccer to supplement mine. It's important that go on your own pace and go slowly from there.
The basics: bike (of course), helmet, water bottles, a patch kit (or spare tube), frame pump.

You should take a look at the sticky topic on this subforum "Beginner's Guide to Getting Started".

Regarding bike prices, there are some as low as $250 going up to $3000 an up. There are no simple rules regarding bike choices - it can depend on what type of riding you plan to do (short term to long term), your preference on components (low, mid or high end), frame geometry, and so on...

For starters, most bikes around $400 are generally worth the money. Ask a friend who has experience to help you in your decision. In the end, choose the bike that you feel comfortable with.

HTH
Thanks for the reply. About the patch kit - since I'm starting I've got no idea about bike maintenance/repair, are there any good books/manuals out there that would help with general bike maintenance and repair?
 

ItsikH

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Sep 24, 2004
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Kerl said:
Thanks for the reply. About the patch kit - since I'm starting I've got no idea about bike maintenance/repair, are there any good books/manuals out there that would help with general bike maintenance and repair?
A spare tube or two are far better for beginners. 2 levers for the tire are also required. The pump should be a good one - do not settle with the smaller ones, they are not strong enough for road bikes. The best way to learn how to replace a tube is with a friend - it is not too difficult. You could also ask for advice around here. I refrain from doing other maintenance myself unless absolutely necessary (e.g. in the middle of nowhere).
As for the bike - I recommend cheaper bikes for beginners, even used ones would do. IMO, the most important part in a bike are the wheels and tires, followed by the "human" parts - saddle, peddals, shoes etc. The frame is not an issue for beginners, just make sure it is the right size!
Other accessories - riding clothes are preferred. head and tail lights are a must for night riding if intended. Helmet is a must. Riding gloves are also required.
 

e_guevara

New Member
Jul 15, 2004
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Kerl said:
Thanks for the reply. About the patch kit - since I'm starting I've got no idea about bike maintenance/repair, are there any good books/manuals out there that would help with general bike maintenance and repair?
"Zinn and the Art of Road Bike Maintenance" is a well recommended book. "Barnett's Manual" is also good. Online, try Park Tool and Sheldon Brown's websites. They have good articles on bike maintenance and repairs.
 

dub-alicious

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Oct 12, 2004
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Training is all relative to the type and the amount of riding you plan on doing. If you are just out there to ride for the fun of it the best advice is ride as much as you can while eating on the rides (drinking also, pwerbars, gels,water or energydrinks) and recovering as best you can after each ride. Gym work will help but you will only really notice it at a certain level of riding.
 

wajones67

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Aug 19, 2004
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As far as a good LBS in Columbus try Bike Warehouse (Bethel and Sawmill), Baer Wheels (High Street in Clintonville) or Devore Bicycles on Cleveland. There are others but these three are the ones I shop at the most and feel the most comfortable at.
 

Kerl

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Oct 11, 2004
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wajones67 said:
As far as a good LBS in Columbus try Bike Warehouse (Bethel and Sawmill), Baer Wheels (High Street in Clintonville) or Devore Bicycles on Cleveland. There are others but these three are the ones I shop at the most and feel the most comfortable at.
Thanks for the LBS suggestions - do you know how close they are in relation to OSU's campus? Are any in walking distance, and are the ones that are too far to walk to in the neighborhood of a COTA stop?
 

RSSrsvp

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Sep 17, 2004
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My LBS offers a free class in changing flats and other basics. You should inquire as to whether the LBS that you purchase your bike from does this also. It was an great class that answered many of my questions. We got to change the tubes ourselves and learned from our mistakes with the manager of my LBS giving us a helping hand. :) .

He recommended C02 cannisters and new tubes for beginners instead of a pump and patch kits. In addition they showed us the "speed lever" tool from crank brothers to remove and replace the tubes instead of using levers. This tool definitely will speed up the process.
 

Azonict

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Oct 12, 2004
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Kerl said:
I have a few questions about road-biking in general though.

What kind of training does it entail?
When I started life as a rodie..
I was a Mountain bike convert..

and started riding with a group of guys whos moto was
"Fun and Fitness"

after 5 years, we have evolved..
Our rides used to be 10 milers, then 20, then 30, then...
and we would take lots of breaks...
average pace of 14-15 MPH...
Just taking it easy..

Now that we have time under our belts we are no longer your "fun and fitness" gourp any more..
We are not the fastest guys out there,
but a group of 6 in a pace line doing every centrury we can find,
stopping 2 times and averaging 18-19 MPH for a century is quick...

But my point is, you can start at either level.
There are guys out there doing both.
But if you are not ready to be "king of the roadies"
then fine a "fun & fitenss" group.

And either you will outgrow them, or they you.
Or you may all choose to stay where you are..

But you will see it happen once you get on the bike and ride..
and your personal goals/personality will aid in your evelution.
 

midnightmoses

New Member
May 11, 2004
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Azonict said:
When I started life as a rodie..

and started riding with a group of guys whos moto was
"Fun and Fitness"

Kerl,

I would definitely recommend finding a compatible group to join. Ask the folks at your LBS about any clubs or organized rides that cater to beginners. That way, you'll benefit from interacting with riders with more experience.

Also, knowing there are scheduled rides with your new friends helps to drive you to get out there. And lastly, in any group, there is always some natural competition. Some may take that too far, but in my opinion, a little competitiveness adds to the fun factor and helps you to improve. That said, the key point is to have fun doing what you enjoy. Find a group that includes folks with similar interests as yours. Enjoy the ride!

Mick
 

Kerl

New Member
Oct 11, 2004
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midnightmoses said:
Kerl,

I would definitely recommend finding a compatible group to join. Ask the folks at your LBS about any clubs or organized rides that cater to beginners. That way, you'll benefit from interacting with riders with more experience.

Also, knowing there are scheduled rides with your new friends helps to drive you to get out there. And lastly, in any group, there is always some natural competition. Some may take that too far, but in my opinion, a little competitiveness adds to the fun factor and helps you to improve. That said, the key point is to have fun doing what you enjoy. Find a group that includes folks with similar interests as yours. Enjoy the ride!

Mick
I'm trying to find a LBS that's close to me still. My friend and I are starting to ride at the same time, and it's comforting to know that I won't be the only low-skilled member in the LBS riding group when I start.
 

Azonict

New Member
Oct 12, 2004
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Kerl said:
I'm trying to find a LBS that's close to me still. My friend and I are starting to ride at the same time, and it's comforting to know that I won't be the only low-skilled member in the LBS riding group when I start.
not at all...
you should look for organized group rides in your area too..
Those will make even a beginner feel great about their abilities,
and also humble the more arrogant...

but more important is you see you are not alone..
and ahead of the game compaired to some...
 

wajones67

New Member
Aug 19, 2004
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Kerl said:
Thanks for the LBS suggestions - do you know how close they are in relation to OSU's campus? Are any in walking distance, and are the ones that are too far to walk to in the neighborhood of a COTA stop?

Baer Wheels and Bike Source (campus store) are both on the #2 High street bus (go north) and both are within 1.5 miles of Lane and High.
 

Kerl

New Member
Oct 11, 2004
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wajones67 said:
Baer Wheels and Bike Source (campus store) are both on the #2 High street bus (go north) and both are within 1.5 miles of Lane and High.
That's terrific, I'll try to get to both this weekend then. Thanks for all the help!
 

HammerTD

New Member
Oct 13, 2004
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be prepared. most entry level road bikes are going to start price wise between 500 and 600.