impetigo confusion. please help.

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Kirsty, Jan 27, 2004.

  1. Kirsty

    Kirsty Guest

    i'm very new to this board so I'm not sure if I'm sending it to the right place, but anyway, here's
    my problem. In September I went to my university doctors because I was getting these spots on my
    face that leaked & formed yellow crusts. He diagnosed impetigo. The thing is, I only seem to get one
    spot at a time, then it crusts and goes within a few days, and then within a week another one will
    appear. Also, I thought impetigo was supposed to be contagious, but I've never spread it to any
    other part of my body, or to anyone else, even those who I have been kissing, sharing pillows,
    towels etc with. I've had blood tests which came back normal and nasal tests for staphoc... (can't
    remember how you spell it) and I've been given two different prescriptions of antibiotics, which
    I've been on since September, so over 3 months now and have seen NO improvement whatsoever. I just
    wondered if this is common in impetigo, because everything I've read seems to suggest that
    antibiotics is the last thing doctors can give you, and is basically guaranteed to get rid of
    impetigo. But it's not getting rid of mine, and I'm getting really depressed about it and missing
    classes at uni because I can't face people seeing me like this. Any information/help would be great,
    Thanks, Kirsty
     
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  2. Drumbo

    Drumbo Guest

    [email protected] (Kirsty) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > i'm very new to this board so I'm not sure if I'm sending it to the right place, but anyway,
    > here's my problem. In September I went to my university doctors because I was getting these spots
    > on my face that leaked & formed yellow crusts. He diagnosed impetigo. The thing is, I only seem to
    > get one spot at a time, then it crusts and goes within a few days, and then within a week another
    > one will appear. Also, I thought impetigo was supposed to be contagious, but I've never spread it
    > to any other part of my body, or to anyone else, even those who I have been kissing, sharing
    > pillows, towels etc with. I've had blood tests which came back normal and nasal tests for
    > staphoc... (can't remember how you spell it) and I've been given two different prescriptions of
    > antibiotics, which I've been on since September, so over 3 months now and have seen NO improvement
    > whatsoever. I just wondered if this is common in impetigo, because everything I've read seems to
    > suggest that antibiotics is the last thing doctors can give you, and is basically guaranteed to
    > get rid of impetigo. But it's not getting rid of mine, and I'm getting really depressed about it
    > and missing classes at uni because I can't face people seeing me like this. Any information/help
    > would be great, Thanks, Kirsty

    Kirsty, I've been getting recurring impetigo since I was three years old (30 years). I'm suffering
    from it now. In my experience, antibiotics do very little to relieve the problem(although, I still
    take them just in case). Ask your doctor to subscribe Bactroban topical ointment. If you can't get
    that, use Neosporin. The following treatment was recommended to me by my GP in the 70's, and
    although most dermatologists frown on it, it's the only thing that works for me.
    1. Wash the affected areas with soap and hot water.
    2. Soak the affected areas with hot water for a few minutes.
    3. Scrub the sores until they bleed.
    4. Apply the bactroban.

    Most dermatologists might tell you that you're risking further infection by breaking the skin, but I
    think that if you're careful about covering with bactroban, you'll be alright. If you've got a
    milder case, you can get away with just scrubbing the pus off, but, in my experience, you won't see
    any progress until you break the skin. It's the only way to get at the bacteria. You may also want
    the dermatologist to take a sample of the infection, to determine the proper antibiotic ointment.
    You should be careful not to spread it. Use paper towels to scrub the sores. It is very contagious
    to children especially. I got it from my mom when I was young, I have been getting it on and off for
    30 years. And, the by the way, I sympathize with you not wanting to face people. I've been going to
    work, looking like I just got mugged. Richie
     
  3. Alan Jacques

    Alan Jacques Guest

    You guys can't keep taking antibiotics all your lives, they are indeed the last resort.

    Kristy, I recommend that you visit another doctor for a 2nd opinion. The one you are seeing
    obviously isin't doing all they can for you which is a lapse of their duty of care.

    I also recommend that you both seek out a reputable (by word of mouth) Homoeopath. This therapy has
    a good track record for dealing with pesky chronic conditions that should go away but don't.
    Homoeopathy would basically suggest that your bodies have a very specific weakness to this type of
    infection and would seek to address that weakness specifically. Treatment can take some months, but
    you should be seeing results by the first month.

    Feel free to write with any more questions -Alan Jacques.

    "drumbo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] (Kirsty) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > i'm very new to this board so I'm not sure if I'm sending it to the right place, but anyway,
    > > here's my problem. In September I went to my university doctors because I was getting these
    > > spots on my face that leaked & formed yellow crusts. He diagnosed impetigo. The thing is, I only
    > > seem to get one spot at a time, then it crusts and goes within a few days, and then within a
    > > week another one will appear. Also, I thought impetigo was supposed to be contagious, but I've
    > > never spread it to any other part of my body, or to anyone else, even those who I have been
    > > kissing, sharing pillows, towels etc with. I've had blood tests which came back normal and nasal
    > > tests for staphoc... (can't remember how you spell it) and I've been given two different
    > > prescriptions of antibiotics, which I've been on since September, so over 3 months now and have
    > > seen NO improvement whatsoever. I just wondered if this is common in impetigo, because
    > > everything I've read seems to suggest that antibiotics is the last thing doctors can give you,
    > > and is basically guaranteed to get rid of impetigo. But it's not getting rid of mine, and I'm
    > > getting really depressed about it and missing classes at uni because I can't face people seeing
    > > me like this. Any information/help would be great, Thanks, Kirsty
    >
    > Kirsty, I've been getting recurring impetigo since I was three years old (30 years). I'm suffering
    > from it now. In my experience, antibiotics do very little to relieve the problem(although, I still
    > take them just in case). Ask your doctor to subscribe Bactroban topical ointment. If you can't get
    > that, use Neosporin. The following treatment was recommended to me by my GP in the 70's, and
    > although most dermatologists frown on it, it's the only thing that works for me.
    > 1. Wash the affected areas with soap and hot water.
    > 2. Soak the affected areas with hot water for a few minutes.
    > 3. Scrub the sores until they bleed.
    > 4. Apply the bactroban.
    >
    > Most dermatologists might tell you that you're risking further infection by breaking the skin, but
    > I think that if you're careful about covering with bactroban, you'll be alright. If you've got a
    > milder case, you can get away with just scrubbing the pus off, but, in my experience, you won't
    > see any progress until you break the skin. It's the only way to get at the bacteria. You may also
    > want the dermatologist to take a sample of the infection, to determine the proper antibiotic
    > ointment. You should be careful not to spread it. Use paper towels to scrub the sores. It is very
    > contagious to children especially. I got it from my mom when I was young, I have been getting it
    > on and off for 30 years. And, the by the way, I sympathize with you not wanting to face people.
    > I've been going to work, looking like I just got mugged. Richie

    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.550 / Virus Database: 342 - Release Date: 9/12/2003
     
  4. Drumbo

    Drumbo Guest

    Thanks, Alan. Here's a good reference, Kirsty:
    http://www.whatreallyworks.co.uk/start/kidszone.asp?article_ID=164 I'm following this treatment now.
    I wasn't able to find the Arum triphyllum, but I'm taking all the vitamins(+ garlic pills) and using
    a tea tree oil cream, which, so far, has had better results than the bactroban.

    Has anyone tried Impetigo No More (http://www.fonoils.com/impetigonomore1.html)? If so, was it
    effective? Richie

    "Alan Jacques" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > You guys can't keep taking antibiotics all your lives, they are indeed the last resort.
    >
    > Kristy, I recommend that you visit another doctor for a 2nd opinion. The one you are seeing
    > obviously isin't doing all they can for you which is a lapse of their duty of care.
    >
    > I also recommend that you both seek out a reputable (by word of mouth) Homoeopath. This therapy
    > has a good track record for dealing with pesky chronic conditions that should go away but don't.
    > Homoeopathy would basically suggest that your bodies have a very specific weakness to this type of
    > infection and would seek to address that weakness specifically. Treatment can take some months,
    > but you should be seeing results by the first month.
    >
    > Feel free to write with any more questions -Alan Jacques.
    >
    >
    > "drumbo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > [email protected] (Kirsty) wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > i'm very new to this board so I'm not sure if I'm sending it to the right place, but anyway,
    > > > here's my problem. In September I went to my university doctors because I was getting these
    > > > spots on my face that leaked & formed yellow crusts. He diagnosed impetigo. The thing is, I
    > > > only seem to get one spot at a time, then it crusts and goes within a few days, and then
    > > > within a week another one will appear. Also, I thought impetigo was supposed to be contagious,
    > > > but I've never spread it to any other part of my body, or to anyone else, even those who I
    > > > have been kissing, sharing pillows, towels etc with. I've had blood tests which came back
    > > > normal and nasal tests for staphoc... (can't remember how you spell it) and I've been given
    > > > two different prescriptions of antibiotics, which I've been on since September, so over 3
    > > > months now and have seen NO improvement whatsoever. I just wondered if this is common in
    > > > impetigo, because everything I've read seems to suggest that antibiotics is the last thing
    > > > doctors can give you, and is basically guaranteed to get rid of impetigo. But it's not getting
    > > > rid of mine, and I'm getting really depressed about it and missing classes at uni because I
    > > > can't face people seeing me like this. Any information/help would be great, Thanks, Kirsty
    > >
    > > Kirsty, I've been getting recurring impetigo since I was three years old (30 years). I'm
    > > suffering from it now. In my experience, antibiotics do very little to relieve the
    > > problem(although, I still take them just in case). Ask your doctor to subscribe Bactroban
    > > topical ointment. If you can't get that, use Neosporin. The following treatment was recommended
    > > to me by my GP in the 70's, and although most dermatologists frown on it, it's the only thing
    > > that works for me.
    > > 1. Wash the affected areas with soap and hot water.
    > > 2. Soak the affected areas with hot water for a few minutes.
    > > 3. Scrub the sores until they bleed.
    > > 4. Apply the bactroban.
    > >
    > > Most dermatologists might tell you that you're risking further infection by breaking the skin,
    > > but I think that if you're careful about covering with bactroban, you'll be alright. If you've
    > > got a milder case, you can get away with just scrubbing the pus off, but, in my experience, you
    > > won't see any progress until you break the skin. It's the only way to get at the bacteria. You
    > > may also want the dermatologist to take a sample of the infection, to determine the proper
    > > antibiotic ointment. You should be careful not to spread it. Use paper towels to scrub the
    > > sores. It is very contagious to children especially. I got it from my mom when I was young, I
    > > have been getting it on and off for 30 years. And, the by the way, I sympathize with you not
    > > wanting to face people. I've been going to work, looking like I just got mugged. Richie
    >
    >
    > ---
    > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    > Version: 6.0.550 / Virus Database: 342 - Release Date: 9/12/2003
     
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