Impossible to remove tyres

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by wheres_my_beard, Apr 24, 2010.

  1. wheres_my_beard

    wheres_my_beard New Member

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    I have some very knobbly winter tyres on my road bike, which I am only now getting round to changing (because I am very lazy like that).

    However, the tyres and rims seem to be conspiring against me in doing so.

    The tyres were tight on the rims when I put them on, but was still able to do this by hand without any tools.

    Trying to get them off so far, I have broken the ends of 2 sets of plastic tyre levers trying to get a good purchase on the tyre's edge, and when I have attempted to used metal levers they simply don't get under the lip enough to be useful and leave bad dents in the rim.

    I am totally frustated by this... are there any good tyre levers around for this kind of problem? All my local stores stock pretty much the same tools. :confused:

    Any useful links or advise would be great.
     
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  2. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    Soma fabrications make the toughest tire irons on the market, their steel cored nylon shelled to prevent damaging rims. Then buy a product called the Quik Stik Tire Changer; once you have the tire started by using the irons then insert the Quik Stik and just slide it around the rim and it will remove the rest of the tire.

    The following info will help you with stubborn tires but you probably already know this stuff.

    Tire levers typically come in sets of two or three. One end of the lever is curved somewhat like a spoon, and the other end has a hook on it. Take the first lever and work the spoon end in between the bead of the tire — the hard part of your tire that sits closest to the rim — and the rim itself. Then push down on the lever. This will pull the bead of the tire away from the rim.

    At this point, try to pull the lever in either direction around the rim to separate the tire from the rim. Some tires will come off easily, but others may be stubborn. If your tire is a stubborn one, pry that first lever back and use the hook end of the lever to hook it to the spokes. Then, take another tire lever and repeat the process about five to six inches away from the first lever. This should pull the tire away from the rim.

    Then once the tire is pulled away from the rim insert the Quik Stik and just guide it around the rim which will remove the tire automatically without having to keep repositioning the irons.
     
  3. wheres_my_beard

    wheres_my_beard New Member

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    The Soma tyre levers look good, and have some interesting reviews, I might well get some, as my original tyres were a chore to get off too. Luckily i haven't had a puncture in the two years of owning this bike, otherwise I would be in a real pickle.

    In the mean time, I'm going to see it any of the local bike shops can get these tyres off.

    Thanks for the reply :)
     
  4. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    Odd, must MTB tires are easier to get off then most road bike tires...at least that's been my experience. Winter tires tend to be more difficult to remove then regular tires though; also folding MTB tires are easier to remove then either. Fortunately MTB tires are thicker then road tires thus flats are far and few between, so fixing a flat is rare; on my MTB I haven't had a flat since I bought the bike in 87 even though I wore out one set of tires (I don't ride the bike much because I hate it! It's my camping, bang around, and trainer bike).
     
  5. baphometcycles

    baphometcycles New Member

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    A couple tips:

    a) Always go around the entire wheel and pinch the beads of the tire together; the profile of a wheel's rim is a "u" shape. Thus, the tire is inflated, the beads are push up and out--onto the high spots of the "u". By pushing the bead to the middle of the rim, you're enabling slack in the tire that can be pushed up and over the rim.

    b) Next, hold the wheel parallel to you. Put the tip of your toe on the bottom of the rim and hold the wheel to the ground. Starting from the bottom pull on the tire with each and on opposite sides of the wheel. Work your hands from the bottom of the wheel around to the top. Basically, you're trying to collect all the slack in the tire so you can push the tire up and over the rim.

    Its difficult to put all this in words, so I'll try and post a video and pictures on my website within the next couple days. It'll be in the "DIY" section.

    Bama
     
  6. gordonharris912

    gordonharris912 New Member

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    Empty all the air out of the tubes, then press the edges of the tire in so that they no longer are stuck to the rim. Push one tire toward the inside of the wheel close to the stem, and that will allow a bit more room to work from the other side.

    Gordon Harris
    New England cycling| New England bike rides|affordable bike tours
     
  7. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    chances are that the problem is the tire itself, not the tire levers nor your technique.
    anyway, if it helps, 3 levers make the job easier than 2 levers, you hook the first one on your tire and then attach it to a spoke, do the same with the 2nd one and then you have your hands free for the 3rd one
     
  8. wheres_my_beard

    wheres_my_beard New Member

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    Thanks for all the tips and advice :)

    I actually used a local shop to get the tyres off. It took them all of 30 seconds to deflate then get most of the tyre loose on the first wheel. I felt a bit of an idiot to be honest.

    The guy seemed to be using some special tyre levers, so I asked if that would make a difference (thinking that I just had cheap/sh*t/basic tools), so he did the same on other wheel with some cheap/sh*t/basic levers he had laying around - again in a matter of seconds... again I felt a bit of an idiot. :eek:

    I think it may well have been the beading that I hadn't loosened properly, so there was some play in the tyre.

    Anyways, problem solved, and lesson learned.

    This is what happens when you are too lucky and don't get flats/ change tyres for too long.
     
  9. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    sometimes it looks easy but is not necessarily easy !
    i think this motto apply to all kinds of trades and jobs
     
  10. wheres_my_beard

    wheres_my_beard New Member

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    That's a fair point.

    Also he's probably changed more tyres than I've had healthy dinners :p
     
  11. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    Now that you have seen it done it's time to start practicing doing it so if you have a flat on the road you can handle it there on the spot, then say "wee that was fun!" after your done.
     
  12. paulmurphy

    paulmurphy New Member

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    Yes, this is a happy ending, and a little lesson to get to know the folks at your local shop. After all, you share a big common interest with them - bikes! - and probably can become good friends. And don’t mind spending a little money there, you DO want them to make a bit of profit to stay in business and be there next time you really need them.
     
  13. wheres_my_beard

    wheres_my_beard New Member

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    You have a good point Paul, I should get to know them better, especially as I ride past their shop every single day going to work.

    Luckily I haven't had to, as, uptil now, I have been riding totally trouble free for about three years, or if there has been things to sort I have been able to do it myself.

    Maybe I should take as lesson from the armed forces and "field strip" my bike until I can get to know it like the back of my hand. That's possibly a bit extreme, but certainly being competent at taking a tyre off is a relative basic for all cyclists!

    As a strangely unfunny joke goes "How do you get to Carnegie Hall?" "Practice, practice, practice"
     
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