Impressed with my Ibex

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Gooserider, Jun 18, 2004.

  1. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    I received my Ibex Corrida CT 2.2(flat bar road bike) yesterday. Nice bike
    for the price. The assembly went quickly, with only minor derailleur
    adjustments required. I received far more bike than I expected for $299. Are
    the Shimano 2200 components as smooth as the 105 on my Schwinn? Nope. But
    they're functional, and finding a bike with real rack and fender eyelets(and
    even front pannier supports) for this price is nearly impossible. I searched
    for used touring bikes on eBay forever, but even they were going for more
    than $299. If anyone is interested in a relatively cheap light
    tourer/commuter/town bike they would be well served to consider Ibex. But
    support your local bike shop also.
     
    Tags:


  2. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Gooserider wrote:
    :: I received my Ibex Corrida CT 2.2(flat bar road bike) yesterday.
    :: Nice bike for the price. The assembly went quickly, with only minor
    :: derailleur adjustments required. I received far more bike than I
    :: expected for $299. Are the Shimano 2200 components as smooth as the
    :: 105 on my Schwinn? Nope. But they're functional, and finding a bike
    :: with real rack and fender eyelets(and even front pannier supports)
    :: for this price is nearly impossible. I searched for used touring
    :: bikes on eBay forever, but even they were going for more than $299.
    :: If anyone is interested in a relatively cheap light
    :: tourer/commuter/town bike they would be well served to consider
    :: Ibex. But support your local bike shop also.

    I'd like to hear back about this after about 1000 miles :)
     
  3. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Gooserider wrote:
    > :: I received my Ibex Corrida CT 2.2(flat bar road bike) yesterday.
    > :: Nice bike for the price. The assembly went quickly, with only minor
    > :: derailleur adjustments required. I received far more bike than I
    > :: expected for $299. Are the Shimano 2200 components as smooth as the
    > :: 105 on my Schwinn? Nope. But they're functional, and finding a bike
    > :: with real rack and fender eyelets(and even front pannier supports)
    > :: for this price is nearly impossible. I searched for used touring
    > :: bikes on eBay forever, but even they were going for more than $299.
    > :: If anyone is interested in a relatively cheap light
    > :: tourer/commuter/town bike they would be well served to consider
    > :: Ibex. But support your local bike shop also.
    >
    > I'd like to hear back about this after about 1000 miles :)


    I really don't see any place for a problem. There are no junk components on
    it, and the frame is Taiwanese(Kinesis?). No mainland Chinese bike here,
    which was a nice bonus. The rear derailleur is a bit cheesy, with big
    plastic pulleys, but a 105 derailleur isn't exactly expensive. :) Heck, the
    frame alone is worth the price, if for the presence of eyelets alone.

    Mike
     
  4. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Gooserider wrote:
    :: "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    :: news:[email protected]
    ::: Gooserider wrote:
    ::::: I received my Ibex Corrida CT 2.2(flat bar road bike) yesterday.
    ::::: Nice bike for the price. The assembly went quickly, with only
    ::::: minor derailleur adjustments required. I received far more bike
    ::::: than I expected for $299. Are the Shimano 2200 components as
    ::::: smooth as the 105 on my Schwinn? Nope. But they're functional,
    ::::: and finding a bike with real rack and fender eyelets(and even
    ::::: front pannier supports)
    ::::: for this price is nearly impossible. I searched for used touring
    ::::: bikes on eBay forever, but even they were going for more than
    ::::: $299.
    ::::: If anyone is interested in a relatively cheap light
    ::::: tourer/commuter/town bike they would be well served to consider
    ::::: Ibex. But support your local bike shop also.
    :::
    ::: I'd like to hear back about this after about 1000 miles :)
    ::
    :: I really don't see any place for a problem. There are no junk
    :: components on it, and the frame is Taiwanese(Kinesis?). No mainland
    :: Chinese bike here, which was a nice bonus. The rear derailleur is a
    :: bit cheesy, with big plastic pulleys, but a 105 derailleur isn't
    :: exactly expensive. :) Heck, the frame alone is worth the price, if
    :: for the presence of eyelets alone.

    I'm not suggesting there is or even will be a problem. I'd just like to
    know how it holds up over time as I might consider these for potential
    family members. The price is surely right.
     
  5. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Gooserider wrote:
    > :: "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > :: news:[email protected]
    > ::: Gooserider wrote:
    > ::::: I received my Ibex Corrida CT 2.2(flat bar road bike) yesterday.
    > ::::: Nice bike for the price. The assembly went quickly, with only
    > ::::: minor derailleur adjustments required. I received far more bike
    > ::::: than I expected for $299. Are the Shimano 2200 components as
    > ::::: smooth as the 105 on my Schwinn? Nope. But they're functional,
    > ::::: and finding a bike with real rack and fender eyelets(and even
    > ::::: front pannier supports)
    > ::::: for this price is nearly impossible. I searched for used touring
    > ::::: bikes on eBay forever, but even they were going for more than
    > ::::: $299.
    > ::::: If anyone is interested in a relatively cheap light
    > ::::: tourer/commuter/town bike they would be well served to consider
    > ::::: Ibex. But support your local bike shop also.
    > :::
    > ::: I'd like to hear back about this after about 1000 miles :)
    > ::
    > :: I really don't see any place for a problem. There are no junk
    > :: components on it, and the frame is Taiwanese(Kinesis?). No mainland
    > :: Chinese bike here, which was a nice bonus. The rear derailleur is a
    > :: bit cheesy, with big plastic pulleys, but a 105 derailleur isn't
    > :: exactly expensive. :) Heck, the frame alone is worth the price, if
    > :: for the presence of eyelets alone.
    >
    > I'm not suggesting there is or even will be a problem. I'd just like to
    > know how it holds up over time as I might consider these for potential
    > family members. The price is surely right.


    Cool, Roger. The smiley emoticon threw me off, is all. Ibex is blowing out
    the Corrida CT 2.2(my bike) because it's being replaced next year with the
    3.3. Upgraded frame with 6061 instead of 7005. Regular list is $550 or so. I
    like it---it even has a pimpin' metal flake paint job. LOL.
     
  6. > I really don't see any place for a problem. There are no junk components
    on
    > it, and the frame is Taiwanese(Kinesis?). No mainland Chinese bike here,
    > which was a nice bonus. The rear derailleur is a bit cheesy, with big
    > plastic pulleys, but a 105 derailleur isn't exactly expensive. :) Heck,

    the
    > frame alone is worth the price, if for the presence of eyelets alone.


    OK, I'll bite. What's with the fascination/uniqueness with fender & rack
    eyelets? I have dozens of bikes on my floor with 'em, and never regarded
    them as anything that I ought to be using as a huge sales feature... I
    figured most such bikes (flat-bar road bikes & hybrids, as well as mountain
    bikes) have them. The only issue being that you won't find them and
    couldn't really use them anyway on a suspension front fork.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  7. Rich Clark

    Rich Clark Guest

    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > OK, I'll bite. What's with the fascination/uniqueness with fender & rack
    > eyelets? I have dozens of bikes on my floor with 'em, and never regarded
    > them as anything that I ought to be using as a huge sales feature... I
    > figured most such bikes (flat-bar road bikes & hybrids, as well as

    mountain
    > bikes) have them. The only issue being that you won't find them and
    > couldn't really use them anyway on a suspension front fork.


    The suspension fork is a big part of the problem. It's hard to find a decent
    new, low-cost bike with a rigid fork, and rack/fender mounts front and rear.
    These features are important on a commuter bike in climates with sloppy
    weather. A suspension fork isn't.

    In an area like mine (Philadelphia) with average rainfall and seasonal
    cycles, full fenders make the difference between having to shower after a
    wet commute and only having to dry off. (The streets are *very* dirty;
    without fenders, you arrive with your legs and back covered with grime and
    slime.)

    The touring and cyclocross bikes usually used in this situation cost a lot
    more than this $300 Ibex.

    RichC
     
  8. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:

    > OK, I'll bite. What's with the fascination/uniqueness with fender & rack
    > eyelets? I have dozens of bikes on my floor with 'em, and never regarded
    > them as anything that I ought to be using as a huge sales feature...


    If you never ride in the rain and never intend to carry more than a
    spare tube and cell phone, then eyelets aren't much of a sales
    feature. Then again, eyelets mark the difference between a race bike
    and a sport tourer. I ride in almost any weather and occasionally
    take multi-day trips. Lack of eyelets would be a no-sale feature for
    me.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://bike.terrymorse.com/
     
  9. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Terry Morse wrote:

    >Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    >
    >>OK, I'll bite. What's with the fascination/uniqueness with fender & rack
    >>eyelets? I have dozens of bikes on my floor with 'em, and never regarded
    >>them as anything that I ought to be using as a huge sales feature...
    >>

    >
    >If you never ride in the rain and never intend to carry more than a
    >spare tube and cell phone, then eyelets aren't much of a sales
    >feature. Then again, eyelets mark the difference between a race bike
    >and a sport tourer. I ride in almost any weather and occasionally
    >take multi-day trips. Lack of eyelets would be a no-sale feature for
    >me.
    >--
    >terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://bike.terrymorse.com/
    >

    Agreed. As a commuter on the wet coast of British Columbia, if it won't
    take fenders and at least a rear rack, it's not on the table. No point
    even talkin' about it.
    Regards, Bernie
     
  10. >The touring and cyclocross bikes usually used in this situation cost
    >a lot more than this $300 Ibex.


    I'll agree with you on the conditions. But I can't say that it's
    hard to set up a commuter for much over $400 US new even given East
    Coast winter conditions.

    Even assuming a 700C hybrid with fenders and a rack, good tires and
    lights, used it would be a max of $200 for very good reliable
    equipment.

    Fot $400 you're talking an extra margin and possibly a new bicycle,
    however it isn't impossible to bring in an entire commuting rig
    including lights, fenders, etc. for $300.

    You don't want anything too attractive in the city, but you do want
    a reliable, well maintained, and all weather capable bicycle.

    Old road machines, hybrids, cyclocross and slick-eqipped MTBs all
    work in this role.

    Consider that you'll want to carry stuff like groceries, so a rack
    and panniers are a good idea.

    It's actually not hard to be a complete Fred for very little money.

    --

    _______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________
    ------------------"Buddy Holly, the Texas Elvis"------------------
    __________306.350.357.38>>[email protected]__________
     
  11. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > > I really don't see any place for a problem. There are no junk components

    > on
    > > it, and the frame is Taiwanese(Kinesis?). No mainland Chinese bike here,
    > > which was a nice bonus. The rear derailleur is a bit cheesy, with big
    > > plastic pulleys, but a 105 derailleur isn't exactly expensive. :) Heck,

    > the
    > > frame alone is worth the price, if for the presence of eyelets alone.

    >
    > OK, I'll bite. What's with the fascination/uniqueness with fender & rack
    > eyelets? I have dozens of bikes on my floor with 'em, and never regarded
    > them as anything that I ought to be using as a huge sales feature... I
    > figured most such bikes (flat-bar road bikes & hybrids, as well as

    mountain
    > bikes) have them. The only issue being that you won't find them and
    > couldn't really use them anyway on a suspension front fork.


    I don't know what you're stocking, Mike, but most bikes at my LBS don't have
    'em. None of the MTBs with front suspension do, and the only road bikes I've
    found are cyclocross and touring bikes, and none of those are $300. I can
    get into a Trek 520 for a grand, but a grand is too much to spend for a bike
    I will ride in bad weather and lock to a rack. Too many manufacturers leave
    these off in an effort to mimic "race" bikes, which hampers their
    usefulness. My Schwinn Peloton has no eyelets, nor is there room for fenders
    if it had eyelets. Neither does my MTB. :)
     
  12. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "Eric S. Sande" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > >The touring and cyclocross bikes usually used in this situation cost
    > >a lot more than this $300 Ibex.

    >
    > I'll agree with you on the conditions. But I can't say that it's
    > hard to set up a commuter for much over $400 US new even given East
    > Coast winter conditions.


    I looked for a long time for a cheap bike to suit my needs, but no luck. I
    did not want a hybrid, I wanted a touring or cyclocross bike. I had to
    utilize eBay, because the used bikes in my area tend to be of the 'mart
    variety. I ride a 50 or 52cm, so my selection was very limited. The closest
    I got to finding what I needed was a Miyata 1000 touring bike, 20 yrs old,
    and still went for $400. I don't understand why manufacturers have quit
    making functional road bikes. Geez, it can't cost that much to add some
    eyelets and spec a brake with fender clearance.
     
  13. Rich Clark

    Rich Clark Guest

    "Eric S. Sande" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > >The touring and cyclocross bikes usually used in this situation cost
    > >a lot more than this $300 Ibex.

    >
    > I'll agree with you on the conditions. But I can't say that it's
    > hard to set up a commuter for much over $400 US new even given East
    > Coast winter conditions.
    >
    > Even assuming a 700C hybrid with fenders and a rack, good tires and
    > lights, used it would be a max of $200 for very good reliable
    > equipment.
    >
    > Fot $400 you're talking an extra margin and possibly a new bicycle,
    > however it isn't impossible to bring in an entire commuting rig
    > including lights, fenders, etc. for $300.


    Examples? Off-the-shelf bikes, now; not some clever combination of
    unassembled parts the typical buyer wouldn't know what to do with. And it
    has to come stock with a rigid front fork that has rack and fender mounts.

    > You don't want anything too attractive in the city, but you do want
    > a reliable, well maintained, and all weather capable bicycle.
    >
    > Old road machines, hybrids, cyclocross and slick-eqipped MTBs all
    > work in this role.


    No argument. But that wasn't the question.

    RichC
     
  14. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Gooserider" <[email protected]> writes:

    > I don't know what you're stocking, Mike, but most bikes at my LBS don't have
    > 'em. None of the MTBs with front suspension do, and the only road bikes I've
    > found are cyclocross and touring bikes, and none of those are $300. I can
    > get into a Trek 520 for a grand, but a grand is too much to spend for a bike
    > I will ride in bad weather and lock to a rack.


    Randonneuring bikes might offer a compromise between
    newness/sleekness and commuterizability. But they can
    be expensive, too. I suppose they can be considered
    as a subset of touring bikes.

    > Too many manufacturers leave
    > these off in an effort to mimic "race" bikes, which hampers their
    > usefulness. My Schwinn Peloton has no eyelets, nor is there room for fenders
    > if it had eyelets. Neither does my MTB. :)


    Some people have said they've resorted to P-clips obtained
    from their local hardware store, as a workaround. But who
    really wants to inflict a bunch of clamps on a factory-new
    paint job?


    cheers,
    Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD
    Above address is just a spam midden.
    I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn [point] bc [point] ca
     
  15. > > OK, I'll bite. What's with the fascination/uniqueness with fender &
    rack
    > > eyelets? I have dozens of bikes on my floor with 'em, and never

    regarded
    > > them as anything that I ought to be using as a huge sales feature...

    >
    > If you never ride in the rain and never intend to carry more than a
    > spare tube and cell phone, then eyelets aren't much of a sales
    > feature. Then again, eyelets mark the difference between a race bike
    > and a sport tourer. I ride in almost any weather and occasionally
    > take multi-day trips. Lack of eyelets would be a no-sale feature for
    > me.


    No disagreements there. My point was that I have quite a number of hybrids
    & road bikes that have eyelets front & rear. Nothing at $300, but the TREK
    7300FX is a pretty nice, light flat-bar machine at $399.99, with eyelets.
    I'm just mystified at the mystique of them, as if they're impossible to find
    nowadays.

    In my perfect world, *every* bike would have eyelets on the rear dropouts,
    even racing bikes. And if some racer thinks "Ack, I can't have fender
    mounts on my bike!" I'll just tell him that's where they hang the frame
    when it's being painted.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  16. > I don't know what you're stocking, Mike, but most bikes at my LBS don't
    have
    > 'em. None of the MTBs with front suspension do, and the only road bikes

    I've
    > found are cyclocross and touring bikes, and none of those are $300. I can
    > get into a Trek 520 for a grand, but a grand is too much to spend for a

    bike
    > I will ride in bad weather and lock to a rack. Too many manufacturers

    leave
    > these off in an effort to mimic "race" bikes, which hampers their
    > usefulness. My Schwinn Peloton has no eyelets, nor is there room for

    fenders
    > if it had eyelets. Neither does my MTB. :)


    http://www.trekbikes.com/bikes/2004/citybike/7300fx.jsp#largerview

    Goes for $399, very light, boring but reliable equipment, just plain works.
    And has eyelets everywhere. We sell a lot of them. Unfortunately, they've
    been tough to get from time to time, as TREK underestimated demand.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  17. Gooserider

    Gooserider Guest

    "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > > I don't know what you're stocking, Mike, but most bikes at my LBS don't

    > have
    > > 'em. None of the MTBs with front suspension do, and the only road bikes

    > I've
    > > found are cyclocross and touring bikes, and none of those are $300. I

    can
    > > get into a Trek 520 for a grand, but a grand is too much to spend for a

    > bike
    > > I will ride in bad weather and lock to a rack. Too many manufacturers

    > leave
    > > these off in an effort to mimic "race" bikes, which hampers their
    > > usefulness. My Schwinn Peloton has no eyelets, nor is there room for

    > fenders
    > > if it had eyelets. Neither does my MTB. :)

    >
    > http://www.trekbikes.com/bikes/2004/citybike/7300fx.jsp#largerview
    >
    > Goes for $399, very light, boring but reliable equipment, just plain

    works.
    > And has eyelets everywhere. We sell a lot of them. Unfortunately,

    they've
    > been tough to get from time to time, as TREK underestimated demand.


    Nice bike, indeed. The type of bike most people should be riding, in a
    perfect world. I'm sure you do sell a lot of them. I can't tell, does it
    have rack eyelets on the seatstays, and front rack mounts?

    Mike
     
  18. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > >The touring and cyclocross bikes usually used in this situation cost
    > >a lot more than this $300 Ibex.

    >
    > I'll agree with you on the conditions. But I can't say that it's
    > hard to set up a commuter for much over $400 US new even given East
    > Coast winter conditions.


    Where on the East Coast? Miami or Portland? <Grin>

    .....

    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    newsgroups if possible).
     
  19. Rich Clark

    Rich Clark Guest

    "Gooserider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > > I don't know what you're stocking, Mike, but most bikes at my LBS

    don't
    > > have
    > > > 'em. None of the MTBs with front suspension do, and the only road

    bikes
    > > I've
    > > > found are cyclocross and touring bikes, and none of those are $300. I

    > can
    > > > get into a Trek 520 for a grand, but a grand is too much to spend for

    a
    > > bike
    > > > I will ride in bad weather and lock to a rack. Too many manufacturers

    > > leave
    > > > these off in an effort to mimic "race" bikes, which hampers their
    > > > usefulness. My Schwinn Peloton has no eyelets, nor is there room for

    > > fenders
    > > > if it had eyelets. Neither does my MTB. :)

    > >
    > > http://www.trekbikes.com/bikes/2004/citybike/7300fx.jsp#largerview
    > >
    > > Goes for $399, very light, boring but reliable equipment, just plain

    > works.
    > > And has eyelets everywhere. We sell a lot of them. Unfortunately,

    > they've
    > > been tough to get from time to time, as TREK underestimated demand.

    >
    > Nice bike, indeed. The type of bike most people should be riding, in a
    > perfect world. I'm sure you do sell a lot of them. I can't tell, does it
    > have rack eyelets on the seatstays, and front rack mounts?


    What I find mildly amusing about it is that the regular old Trek 7300 of the
    late 90's was basically this bike: essentially an upright touring bike with
    a nice cro-mo fork, fat road tires, sane gearing, and few frills. Then they
    started gussying it up with springs and adjustable this and that until it
    was no longer the straightforward simple machine it once was. Now comes the
    "FX" version which just drops all the extra crap that isn't really much use
    on a bike of this class in the first place.

    Marketing. Gotta love it.

    RichC
     
  20. > Nice bike, indeed. The type of bike most people should be riding, in a
    > perfect world. I'm sure you do sell a lot of them. I can't tell, does it
    > have rack eyelets on the seatstays, and front rack mounts?


    OK, I'm at the shop, just looked at one. Rack fittings top & bottom, plus
    mid-fork fittings for a front rack. Plus a kickstand plate if you like
    (y'know, for commuting, it might not be so bad...).

    --Mike Jacoubowsky
    Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReaction.com
    IMBA, BikesBelong, NBDA member

    "Gooserider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > > I don't know what you're stocking, Mike, but most bikes at my LBS

    don't
    > > have
    > > > 'em. None of the MTBs with front suspension do, and the only road

    bikes
    > > I've
    > > > found are cyclocross and touring bikes, and none of those are $300. I

    > can
    > > > get into a Trek 520 for a grand, but a grand is too much to spend for

    a
    > > bike
    > > > I will ride in bad weather and lock to a rack. Too many manufacturers

    > > leave
    > > > these off in an effort to mimic "race" bikes, which hampers their
    > > > usefulness. My Schwinn Peloton has no eyelets, nor is there room for

    > > fenders
    > > > if it had eyelets. Neither does my MTB. :)

    > >
    > > http://www.trekbikes.com/bikes/2004/citybike/7300fx.jsp#largerview
    > >
    > > Goes for $399, very light, boring but reliable equipment, just plain

    > works.
    > > And has eyelets everywhere. We sell a lot of them. Unfortunately,

    > they've
    > > been tough to get from time to time, as TREK underestimated demand.

    >
    > Nice bike, indeed. The type of bike most people should be riding, in a
    > perfect world. I'm sure you do sell a lot of them. I can't tell, does it
    > have rack eyelets on the seatstays, and front rack mounts?
    >
    > Mike
    >
    >
     
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