Improve 25 mile TT!

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by Karp, Jan 31, 2004.

  1. Karp

    Karp New Member

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    Hi folks!

    I am a 17 year old rider from Sweden. I got stuck in cycling the last summer when I got a injury in my foot and therefore couldn`t run. I have been a tennis player for about 10 years and therefore the fitness is a main part of my life.

    I started to do some 30-40 mile rides on my dad`s MTB and I was stuck, I loved cycling. The winter in Sweden is pretty long and this Christmas I decided to get into some serious business with my cycling training. So I went to the gym and worked 2-4 times a week on the trainer, maybe 30-40 minute sessions each time. I still train 2-4 times a week, both high cadence, intervall and hill training.

    I have heard alot of people talkoing about the magic " one hour limit" for the 25 mile TT. So i thought, why not give it a try?I managed to ride in 25 m/h for 15 minutes, then I was totally exhausted.

    All this was made on a trainer in the gym. This summer I will go for a roadbike, probably a bianchi.

    Now I have some questions.....

    1. What kind of training should I do and how often? Is 3 times a week enough? ( I was pretty fit before I started cycling due to all the running sessions with my tennis)

    2. How long will it take to reach the goal with serious training.

    3. I am pretty thin, 145 lbs/66kg, will this be to my disadvantage when using the trainer ?


    "Pain is good, it never let`s you down, it always hurts"


    /Alex

    :cool: :p ;) :D
     
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  2. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

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    1. 3 times a week might be enough if your training is very good. You should be trying to improve your LT and VO2 max primeraly, so have a look at some of the other threads in the forum for ideas. If you're only going to train three times a week, think about intensity not volume!

    2. Depends on you and your serious training. I did a 58 mins and 08 seconds just as I turned 16. I had been training seriously for 2 years (with one year specificaly for TT's) as I wanted to do a good ride in the under 16's national champs. At 17 your body will respond to training in the same way as an adult, but make sure you build up SLOWLY.

    3. Depends on how tall you are, I'm 172 cm and 59 kg. Why would weight be a disadvantage on a trainer?

    4. At which point you get injured!
     
  3. Karp

    Karp New Member

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    The heavier you are the more force you need to produce to ride with the same speed as a rider weighting less, or am I incorrect?
     
  4. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

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    You are correct, but I'm not sure why you think that being thin/light weight would be a disadvantage on an indoor trainer?

    You will probably find you can't produce the same power as someone who is bigger and therefore can't use the same resistance setting at the same cadence; but this isn't a problem as indoor trainers aren't used in bike races!!!!!
     
  5. Karp

    Karp New Member

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    damit, you are right!!!!!!!
     
  6. JuneBug

    JuneBug New Member

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    I was just thinking. If you get a course set up on a computrainer for 25 miles ..a flat course, no wind, no hills, for that same distance and use the pacer guy as a 'motor pacer' to keep you going. If you get his watts set where you can hold that 25 mph. It would keep you on course to do it. at least on a trainer!

    sheese. that just sounds painful. a 10K is painful enough LOL
     
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