Improvements in your first year

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by [email protected], Apr 9, 2006.

  1. Hi,
    Im a mid 30s male and I've been running on and off for about 5 years.
    Decided in November last year that Im going to try for a sub 40 10k by
    October, previous best was 44.12.
    So, since November, I've been putting in around 30 to 35 miles a week
    with lots of speed work and hills and ran a 42.10 this morning.

    Just wondered what sort of improvements you guys saw in your first
    year, once you started to put the weekly milage in.


    Thanks
    JT
     
    Tags:


  2. On 2006-04-09, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Hi,
    > Im a mid 30s male and I've been running on and off for about 5 years.
    > Decided in November last year that Im going to try for a sub 40 10k by
    > October, previous best was 44.12.
    > So, since November, I've been putting in around 30 to 35 miles a week
    > with lots of speed work and hills and ran a 42.10 this morning.
    >
    > Just wondered what sort of improvements you guys saw in your first
    > year, once you started to put the weekly milage in.


    Keep at it. Sub 40 is realistic.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi
    http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  3. Eric

    Eric Guest

    If you want your 10K time to drop from 42s to 39s, I'd suggest the
    following: 1) Maintain current weekly distance. If it happens to go up
    all the better, but you need to focus on speed. 2) Quality speed work.
    Need to push VO2max up. Many different ways to acheive this. If you can
    handle running circles on a track, you can get an accurate view of your
    progress. Use a variety of workouts (distances and speeds), but work up
    to 3 one mile runs around 6:10 should do it (educated guess). At most
    1/week. 5k races could also help. 3) Drive a differentiation between
    running and racing. Taper, sleep, hydrate, etc. When you get to the
    start line you should have a _reasonable_ race plan (pace, hills,
    alone/group, ...) based on your training and past experiences. Run the
    plan. Listen to your body. Unless it is "bad" pain, keep going. ("Bad"
    pain is that which is doing real damage.)

    Good luck. I'm no star, but as a on again off again runner, I did set a
    10K PR at age 43 in the mid 37s.

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Hi,
    > Im a mid 30s male and I've been running on and off for about 5 years.
    > Decided in November last year that Im going to try for a sub 40 10k by
    > October, previous best was 44.12.
    > So, since November, I've been putting in around 30 to 35 miles a week
    > with lots of speed work and hills and ran a 42.10 this morning.
    >
    > Just wondered what sort of improvements you guys saw in your first
    > year, once you started to put the weekly milage in.
    >
    >
    > Thanks
    > JT
     
  4. pam in sc

    pam in sc Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Hi,
    > Im a mid 30s male and I've been running on and off for about 5 years.
    > Decided in November last year that Im going to try for a sub 40 10k by
    > October, previous best was 44.12.
    > So, since November, I've been putting in around 30 to 35 miles a week
    > with lots of speed work and hills and ran a 42.10 this morning.
    >
    > Just wondered what sort of improvements you guys saw in your first
    > year, once you started to put the weekly milage in.



    You may be too fast already for this to apply, but I've heard 10 to 20%
    improvement a year can be possible for the first couple of years. I'm
    hoping for 20% improvement from my first triathlon to the same race a
    year later, but I'm 50 and very slow. I've also heard that people who
    begin at midlife can improve their speed for 7 years before age trumps
    training.

    Pam
     
Loading...
Loading...