Improving Bike Speed .. Tips

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by Dambox, May 6, 2003.

  1. Dambox

    Dambox Guest

    I would be interested in peoples top 3 tips for improving bike speed. I typically finish in the top
    20 in the local races I enter, and over the past 4-5 years my bike splits have remained in the same
    ball park.

    This winter I have been pretty consistent at doing specific training - however this has not made a
    significant difference.

    Hills seem to be the weak point in terms of my abilty to maintain a similar pace to the leaders.
    --------------
    David, England
     
    Tags:


  2. Rivermist

    Rivermist Guest

    aerobars good wheels

    "dambox" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I would be interested in peoples top 3 tips for improving bike speed. I typically finish in the
    > top 20 in the local races I enter, and over the past 4-5 years my bike splits have remained in the
    > same ball park.
    >
    > This winter I have been pretty consistent at doing specific training - however this has not made a
    > significant difference.
    >
    > Hills seem to be the weak point in terms of my abilty to maintain a similar pace to the leaders.
    > --------------
    > David, England
     
  3. David

    David Guest

    >> I would be interested in peoples top 3 tips for improving bike speed.

    1. Interval work - I do 3 min X 10 all out, w/ a 3 min rest interval
    2. Threashold work - This depends on race distance. I typically do a long warm-up and warm-down w/
    an interval equal to 1/2 the target race distance slightly faster than race pace.
    3. Bike Fit - keep dialing until you have it optimized.

    Good Luck! David Never give up, Be satisfied w/ your best, Do unto others.....
     
  4. cj_jessty

    cj_jessty New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2003
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    David,
    You answered your own question. You said that hills seem to be your weak point. If you've identified part or all of the problem, then work on it. Hill repeats are an excellent workout. The same workout you would do for running. Pick a long, steep hill and work on repeats. At least there's your starting point.

    Other things to consider are intervals and one-leg cycling on the trainer. This helps with the pull of your bike stroke instead of just the push.

    Hope this helped.

    cj
     
  5. dambox wrote:
    >
    > I would be interested in peoples top 3 tips for improving bike speed. I typically finish in the
    > top 20 in the local races I enter, and over the past 4-5 years my bike splits have remained in the
    > same ball park.
    >
    > This winter I have been pretty consistent at doing specific training - however this has not made a
    > significant difference.
    >
    > Hills seem to be the weak point in terms of my abilty to maintain a similar pace to the leaders.

    Hill performance on a bicycle is largely a matter of strength to weight ratio - that's why, as the
    climbs get steeper, the little guys do better and better. Dropping weight is worth considering -
    from you, the bike, or both.

    The distances at which you compete matter. Look at Lance Armstrong - he dropped about 10 kilos, if
    memory serves, when he came back from cancer and it took his climbing to the next level. He
    certainly has less muscle than he did before but aerobic exercise is largely about the aerobic
    system and not about absolute strength - the longer the races you do, the more important being
    light becomes.

    There are many strategies for climbing hills on a bicycle. You need to find which works best for
    you and exploit it. For instance, a triathlon bike's forward position is not the best from which to
    get power while seated. If you prefer a relatively low gear when climbing, you might consider
    sliding your saddle back on the rails a bit (moving the bars back as well, of course) to see if
    it's an acceptable compromise - it should give you more seated climbing power. At least experiment
    with sliding back a cm or two on your saddle when you climb seated. If you like to spin up the
    hills it shouldn't make as much of a difference but it's still worth exploring. Don't forget that
    sliding the saddle back can make the effect reach to the pedals longer so you might need to lower
    your saddle as well.

    There is a psychology to hill climbing as well. When you train alone, be sure to pace your effort
    going uphill so that you can continue to push hard as you crest the hill - you want to feel like the
    hill didn't take everything out of you. Learning to pace yourself on hills is critical to having a
    good overall performance on a hilly course.

    -S-
    --
    http://www.kbnj.com
     
  6. You forgot to tell him about working with those strength thingies - what was it? Oh yeah, your balls
    with the handle on the end.

    Steve Freides <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > dambox wrote:
    > >
    > > I would be interested in peoples top 3 tips for improving bike speed. I typically finish in the
    > > top 20 in the local races I enter, and over the past 4-5 years my bike splits have remained in
    > > the same ball park.
    > >
    > > This winter I have been pretty consistent at doing specific training - however this has not made
    > > a significant difference.
    > >
    > > Hills seem to be the weak point in terms of my abilty to maintain a similar pace to the leaders.
    >
    > Hill performance on a bicycle is largely a matter of strength to weight ratio - that's why, as the
    > climbs get steeper, the little guys do better and better. Dropping weight is worth considering -
    > from you, the bike, or both.
    >
    > The distances at which you compete matter. Look at Lance Armstrong - he dropped about 10 kilos, if
    > memory serves, when he came back from cancer and it took his climbing to the next level. He
    > certainly has less muscle than he did before but aerobic exercise is largely about the aerobic
    > system and not about absolute strength - the longer the races you do, the more important being
    > light becomes.
    >
    > There are many strategies for climbing hills on a bicycle. You need to find which works best for
    > you and exploit it. For instance, a triathlon bike's forward position is not the best from which
    > to get power while seated. If you prefer a relatively low gear when climbing, you might consider
    > sliding your saddle back on the rails a bit (moving the bars back as well, of course) to see if
    > it's an acceptable compromise - it should give you more seated climbing power. At least experiment
    > with sliding back a cm or two on your saddle when you climb seated. If you like to spin up the
    > hills it shouldn't make as much of a difference but it's still worth exploring. Don't forget that
    > sliding the saddle back can make the effect reach to the pedals longer so you might need to lower
    > your saddle as well.
    >
    > There is a psychology to hill climbing as well. When you train alone, be sure to pace your effort
    > going uphill so that you can continue to push hard as you crest the hill - you want to feel like
    > the hill didn't take everything out of you. Learning to pace yourself on hills is critical to
    > having a good overall performance on a hilly course.
    >
    > -S-
     
  7. Good answer, David. You are correct and everyone is wrong. That's why you and I will smoke everyone
    else on the bike.

    [email protected] (David) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > >> I would be interested in peoples top 3 tips for improving bike speed.
    >
    > 1. Interval work - I do 3 min X 10 all out, w/ a 3 min rest interval
    > 2. Threashold work - This depends on race distance. I typically do a long warm-up and warm-down
    > w/ an interval equal to 1/2 the target race distance slightly faster than race pace.
    > 3. Bike Fit - keep dialing until you have it optimized.
    >
    > Good Luck! David Never give up, Be satisfied w/ your best, Do unto others.....
     
  8. J-MAT

    J-MAT New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2003
    Messages:
    331
    Likes Received:
    0
    Dambox:

    How fast are you??? How fast can you ride a 10 mile time trial???

    24 mph??? 28 mph??? 30 mph???

    That says a lot about where you are at. Riding at 24 mph, you probably have a lot of room for improvement. Closer to 30 mph??? You may be getting close to your genetic potential.

    What kind of workouts are you doing??? How heavy are you???

    You will do poorly on hills until you train on them all the time. If you are losing big chunks of time on hills, you have no choice but to work on your climbing.

    You need to do speedwork on the flats and on the hills. Concentrate on 3-5 minute efforts for both. Go as fast as possible for 3-5 minutes. If you are doing 3-5 minute intervals and you feel like you could do another 5 minutes, you are going too slow.

    Do some at 70-80 rpm, and also as high as 100-105 rpm. Higher rpm will stress the aerobic system more, lower cadence will shift the burden of power output to the leg muscles, making them stronger. You need to maximize muscle strength and aerobic/anaerobic power for optimal performance.

    On climbs you need to also do hill sprints. Go up at a steady, hard pace, then sprint as hard as possible both seated and standing, until you explode. Since you are on a climb where are you going to go??? You must keep turning the cranks to keep from falling over. Gear down, recover, and sprint again. This will make you very strong and fit. They are very difficult, make sure you have your head into the workout before you clip into the pedals!!!

    If you are using 78+ degrees of seat tube angle, consider going down to 75 degrees if your course has lot of climbing.

    Train on heavy 36 spoke wheels. Always. 36 spokes not 32!!! You want your training wheels to be heavy and slow. Using expensive, trick wheels for everyday training is a crime!!! Use heavy tubes (thornproof) and heavy tires as well. The extra weight/drag of heavy wheels will make you stronger. When you race, put on your light/aero wheels. You will be faster, and the effort will seem easier.

    3-5 minute efforts should be performed at very high intensity, well over 90% of max heart rate. Start of with 1-2 to start, then work up to 4-8 intervals. Your recovery ability will determine how many and how often you should do them.
    Well-trained riders can do 4-8 intervals twice a week or so. Be sure to warmup and cooldown properly!!! Don't do them all year either. If you feel like you are burning out, take a week or so off from these intervals, just ride easy instead.

    Also mix in some 10-20 minute efforts (slower) once in a while, as well as 30-60 minute efforts. You can safely substitute a 10/25 mile TT for these workouts (best).

    Good luck!!!
     
  9. Phil Mee

    Phil Mee Guest

    HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA.
     
  10. Jim Quinn

    Jim Quinn Guest

    Forget the training interval bullshit, the best way to be able to ride faster is to ride with people
    that are better than you and that will stress you to the max.

    "dambox" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I would be interested in peoples top 3 tips for improving bike speed. I typically finish in the
    > top 20 in the local races I enter, and over the past 4-5 years my bike splits have remained in the
    > same ball park.
    >
    > This winter I have been pretty consistent at doing specific training - however this has not made a
    > significant difference.
    >
    > Hills seem to be the weak point in terms of my abilty to maintain a similar pace to the leaders.
    > --------------
    > David, England
     
  11. Jim Quinn

    Jim Quinn Guest

    24 mph is faster than most people do 10 mile time trials and 30 mph would set you up as one of the
    best in the nation.

    "J-MAT" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Dambox:
    >
    > How fast are you??? How fast can you ride a 10 mile time trial???
    >
    > 24 mph??? 28 mph??? 30 mph???
    >
    > That says a lot about where you are at. Riding at 24 mph, you probably have a lot of room for
    > improvement. Closer to 30 mph??? You may be getting close to your genetic potential.
    >
    > .
     
  12. Mee, you are not me. Quit acting like an ass. You know all to well that I would drop you like a
    hot potato.

    [email protected] (Phil Mee) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    >
    > HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA.
     
  13. Wim Colgate

    Wim Colgate Guest

    I beg to differ. There are many 10 mile time trials with the top 10 going under 23 minutes, some in
    the 20-21 minute range.

    20 minutes, of course is the 30Mph mark, while 23 minutes put you at about 26Mph. Granted, a top 10
    finish it good, but there are hundreds of these races across the US -- and not everyone of these
    racers would qualify as one of the best in the nation.

    I've never come close to 30mph in a 10minute time trial (perhaps down a 10% grade with a tail wind
    ;-)), though I'm a decent TT'er and I'm usually in the pack around 23Mph.

    Wim

    "Jim Quinn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:SS%[email protected]...
    > 24 mph is faster than most people do 10 mile time trials and 30 mph would set you up as one of the
    > best in the nation.
    >
    >
    > "J-MAT" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Dambox:
    > >
    > > How fast are you??? How fast can you ride a 10 mile time trial???
    > >
    > > 24 mph??? 28 mph??? 30 mph???
    > >
    > > That says a lot about where you are at. Riding at 24 mph, you probably have a lot of room for
    > > improvement. Closer to 30 mph??? You may be getting close to your genetic potential.
    > >
    > > .
     
  14. Dambox

    Dambox Guest

    I have not done a time trial, however I typically average @ 23 Mph. I am 6'1" 85kg. I typically do a
    mix of training, with @ 2 days / week 45 mins on a bike in Gym (typically constant intense
    sessions). 2 hours cycle at weekend. Rest is running/swimming.

    To be honest, aside from hills on the weekend course I do, I dont specifically train on hills.

    Some excellent advice here.

    On 7 May 2003 10:00:23 +0950, J-MAT <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Dambox:
    >
    >How fast are you??? How fast can you ride a 10 mile time trial???
    >
    >24 mph??? 28 mph??? 30 mph???
    >
    >That says a lot about where you are at. Riding at 24 mph, you probably have a lot of room for
    >improvement. Closer to 30 mph??? You may be getting close to your genetic potential.
    >
    >What kind of workouts are you doing??? How heavy are you???
    >
    >You will do poorly on hills until you train on them all the time. If you are losing big chunks of
    >time on hills, you have no choice but to work on your climbing.
    >
    >You need to do speedwork on the flats and on the hills. Concentrate on 3-5 minute efforts for both.
    >Go as fast as possible for 3-5 minutes. If you are doing 3-5 minute intervals and you feel like you
    >could do another 5 minutes, you are going too slow.
    >
    >Do some at 70-80 rpm, and also as high as 100-105 rpm. Higher rpm will stress the aerobic system
    >more, lower cadence will shift the burden of power output to the leg muscles, making them stronger.
    >You need to maximize muscle strength and aerobic/anaerobic power for optimal performance.
    >
    >On climbs you need to also do hill sprints. Go up at a steady, hard pace, then sprint as hard as
    >possible both seated and standing, until you explode. Since you are on a climb where are you going
    >to go??? You must keep turning the cranks to keep from falling over. Gear down, recover, and sprint
    >again. This will make you very strong and fit. They are very difficult, make sure you have your
    >head into the workout before you clip into the pedals!!!
    >
    >If you are using 78+ degrees of seat tube angle, consider going down to 75 degrees if your course
    >has lot of climbing.
    >
    >Train on heavy 36 spoke wheels. Always. 36 spokes not 32!!! You want your training wheels to be
    >heavy and slow. Using expensive, trick wheels for everyday training is a crime!!! Use heavy tubes
    >(thornproof) and heavy tires as well. The extra weight/drag of heavy wheels will make you stronger.
    >When you race, put on your light/aero wheels. You will be faster, and the effort will seem easier.
    >
    >3-5 minute efforts should be performed at very high intensity, well over 90% of max heart rate.
    >Start of with 1-2 to start, then work up to 4-8 intervals. Your recovery ability will determine how
    >many and how often you should do them. Well-trained riders can do 4-8 intervals twice a week or so.
    >Be sure to warmup and cooldown properly!!! Don't do them all year either. If you feel like you are
    >burning out, take a week or so off from these intervals, just ride easy instead.
    >
    >Also mix in some 10-20 minute efforts (slower) once in a while, as well as 30-60 minute efforts.
    >You can safely substitute a 10/25 mile TT for these workouts (best).
    >
    >Good luck!!!

    --------------
    David, England
     
  15. Train the hills, mate. If you do, you'll move from 20th place to top 3.

    dambox <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I would be interested in peoples top 3 tips for improving bike speed. I typically finish in the
    > top 20 in the local races I enter, and over the past 4-5 years my bike splits have remained in the
    > same ball park.
    >
    > This winter I have been pretty consistent at doing specific training - however this has not made a
    > significant difference.
    >
    > Hills seem to be the weak point in terms of my abilty to maintain a similar pace to the leaders.
    > --------------
    > David, England
     
  16. You are too slow to know anything about improving bike speed. Go to the back of the pack and let the
    big boys pull. You are slowing us down.

    dambox <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I have not done a time trial, however I typically average @ 23 Mph. I am 6'1" 85kg. I typically do
    > a mix of training, with @ 2 days / week 45 mins on a bike in Gym (typically constant intense
    > sessions). 2 hours cycle at weekend. Rest is running/swimming.
    >
    > To be honest, aside from hills on the weekend course I do, I dont specifically train on hills.
    >
    > Some excellent advice here.
     
  17. Ok let me be brief and to the point: if you want to get faster, I mean seriously fast in time trials
    or on triathlon courses, then I recommend that you face the hills dude! Forget the 'gym bike' - get
    out on your own bike - on the road - you need to adapt fully to the race bike and conditions.

    Devise a circuit of say 10 km with 4 different hills of around 500m - 1km in length and with a
    variety of gradients. Over time your aim is to get around this circuit 4 times ( 40km) - it is hard
    on the legs and initially you will have to learn HOW to climb a hill, so that the hills become
    something you love!

    How to climb a hill: take the first part easier than you would go flat out up the hill, spin a nice
    gear, then HOLD the pace whilst you click up a gear ( bigger gear) to your threshold heart rate,
    keep seated and keep the revs constant, now, as you approach the top of the hill, keep seated and
    take the gear to the next gear up - this may be initially quite difficult to hold at your constant
    rev/ so you should really push over the top of the hill with your speed at max as you crest the
    hill, then HOLD the pace and start to spin out the gear down the other side of the hill - this
    trains your speed - this is the place where a lot of people lose it in road races and time trials.

    The other technique is to click up a good two gears in the last 1/4 of the hill and go, go, go OUT
    the saddle accelerating all the way - and basically you should be sprinting over the other of the
    hill before sitting down to recover...never stop at the top! Never change down a gear when going up
    hills, if this happens, then you judged the hill wrong from the bottom and everybody will come
    flying past:-(. In a road race this would mean you would be dropped on the first hill - ummmm, has
    happened to me.

    It is all about practice - do this once a week, or once every 10 days. Your average speed up the
    hills should increase, which should mean you have a substantial increase in power on the road when
    it is totally flat! :)

    The other session I suggest is a long climb of around 10km in length, this compliments the short
    hills and teaches you to keep an 'even effort' when going up hills more than 1.5km. Again it
    trains power and you'll soon discover that 'mountain/hill climbing' requires different
    techniques for different gradients...I could write a thesis tonight but no, I'll let you get
    going with the above....

    Oh and get your aerodynamics checked out for time trailing on the flat - you need a flat back and to
    be comfortable on the bike. Bike saddle height issues come right with experience - once you find the
    right bike, for goodness sake, stick with it! I have a Look and it is a dream machine...Another
    quick tip is that some of this training above can be done in the triathlon races, so remember to
    take loads of rest in between these races and hard trainings.

    R

    Now, these "dambox" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have not done a time trial, however I typically average @ 23 Mph. I am 6'1" 85kg. I typically do
    > a mix of training, with @ 2 days / week 45 mins on a bike in Gym (typically constant intense
    > sessions). 2 hours cycle at weekend. Rest is running/swimming.
    >
    > To be honest, aside from hills on the weekend course I do, I dont specifically train on hills.
    >
    > Some excellent advice here.
    >
    >
    > On 7 May 2003 10:00:23 +0950, J-MAT <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Dambox:
    > >
    > >How fast are you??? How fast can you ride a 10 mile time trial???
    > >
    > >24 mph??? 28 mph??? 30 mph???
    > >
    > >That says a lot about where you are at. Riding at 24 mph, you probably have a lot of room for
    > >improvement. Closer to 30 mph??? You may be getting close to your genetic potential.
    > >
    > >What kind of workouts are you doing??? How heavy are you???
    > >
    > >You will do poorly on hills until you train on them all the time. If you are losing big chunks of
    > >time on hills, you have no choice but to work on your climbing.
    > >
    > >You need to do speedwork on the flats and on the hills. Concentrate on 3-5 minute efforts for
    > >both. Go as fast as possible for 3-5 minutes. If you are doing 3-5 minute intervals and you feel
    > >like you could do another 5 minutes, you are going too slow.
    > >
    > >Do some at 70-80 rpm, and also as high as 100-105 rpm. Higher rpm will stress the aerobic system
    > >more, lower cadence will shift the burden of power output to the leg muscles, making them
    > >stronger. You need to maximize muscle strength and aerobic/anaerobic power for optimal
    > >performance.
    > >
    > >On climbs you need to also do hill sprints. Go up at a steady, hard pace, then sprint as hard as
    > >possible both seated and standing, until you explode. Since you are on a climb where are you
    > >going to go??? You must keep turning the cranks to keep from falling over. Gear down, recover,
    > >and sprint again. This will make you very strong and fit. They are very difficult, make sure you
    > >have your head into the workout before you clip into the pedals!!!
    > >
    > >If you are using 78+ degrees of seat tube angle, consider going down to 75 degrees if your course
    > >has lot of climbing.
    > >
    > >Train on heavy 36 spoke wheels. Always. 36 spokes not 32!!! You want your training wheels to be
    > >heavy and slow. Using expensive, trick wheels for everyday training is a crime!!! Use heavy tubes
    > >(thornproof) and heavy tires as well. The extra weight/drag of heavy wheels will make you
    > >stronger. When you race, put on your light/aero wheels. You will be faster, and the effort will
    > >seem easier.
    > >
    > >3-5 minute efforts should be performed at very high intensity, well over 90% of max heart rate.
    > >Start of with 1-2 to start, then work up to 4-8 intervals. Your recovery ability will determine
    > >how many and how often you should do them. Well-trained riders can do 4-8 intervals twice a week
    > >or so. Be sure to warmup and cooldown properly!!! Don't do them all year either. If you feel like
    > >you are burning out, take a week or so off from these intervals, just ride easy instead.
    > >
    > >Also mix in some 10-20 minute efforts (slower) once in a while, as well as 30-60 minute efforts.
    > >You can safely substitute a 10/25 mile TT for these workouts (best).
    > >
    > >Good luck!!!
    >
    > --------------
    > David, England
     
  18. Beautiful post, Becky. Absolutely magnificent. Will you marry me?

    "Rebecca Bishop" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Ok let me be brief and to the point: if you want to get faster, I mean seriously fast in time
    > trials or on triathlon courses, then I recommend that you face the hills dude! Forget the 'gym
    > bike' - get out on your own bike - on the road - you need to adapt fully to the race bike and
    > conditions.
    >
    > Devise a circuit of say 10 km with 4 different hills of around 500m - 1km in length and with a
    > variety of gradients. Over time your aim is to get around this circuit 4 times ( 40km) - it is
    > hard on the legs and initially you will have to learn HOW to climb a hill, so that the hills
    > become something you love!
    >
    > How to climb a hill: take the first part easier than you would go flat out up the hill, spin a
    > nice gear, then HOLD the pace whilst you click up a gear ( bigger gear) to your threshold heart
    > rate, keep seated and keep the revs constant, now, as you approach the top of the hill, keep
    > seated and take the gear to the next gear up - this may be initially quite difficult to hold at
    > your constant rev/ so you should really push over the top of the hill with your speed at max as
    > you crest the hill, then HOLD the pace and start to spin out the gear down the other side of the
    > hill - this trains your speed - this is the place where a lot of people lose it in road races and
    > time trials.
    >
    > The other technique is to click up a good two gears in the last 1/4 of the hill and go, go, go OUT
    > the saddle accelerating all the way - and basically you should be sprinting over the other of the
    > hill before sitting down to recover...never stop at the top! Never change down a gear when going
    > up hills, if this happens, then you judged the hill wrong from the bottom and everybody will come
    > flying past:-(. In a road race this would mean you would be dropped on the first hill - ummmm, has
    > happened to me.
    >
    > It is all about practice - do this once a week, or once every 10 days. Your average speed up the
    > hills should increase, which should mean you have a substantial increase in power on the road when
    > it is totally flat! :)
    >
    > The other session I suggest is a long climb of around 10km in length, this compliments the short
    > hills and teaches you to keep an 'even effort' when going up hills more than 1.5km. Again it
    > trains power and you'll soon discover that 'mountain/hill climbing' requires different techniques
    > for different gradients...I could write a thesis tonight but no, I'll let you get going with the
    > above....
    >
    > Oh and get your aerodynamics checked out for time trailing on the flat - you need a flat back and
    > to be comfortable on the bike. Bike saddle height issues come right with experience - once you
    > find the right bike, for goodness sake, stick with it! I have a Look and it is a dream
    > machine...Another quick tip is that some of this training above can be done in the triathlon
    > races, so remember to take loads of rest in between these races and hard trainings.
    >
    > R
    >
    >
    > Now, these "dambox" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I have not done a time trial, however I typically average @ 23 Mph. I am 6'1" 85kg. I typically
    > > do a mix of training, with @ 2 days / week 45 mins on a bike in Gym (typically constant intense
    > > sessions). 2 hours cycle at weekend. Rest is running/swimming.
    > >
    > > To be honest, aside from hills on the weekend course I do, I dont specifically train on hills.
    > >
    > > Some excellent advice here.
    > >
    > >
    > > On 7 May 2003 10:00:23 +0950, J-MAT <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > >Dambox:
    > > >
    > > >How fast are you??? How fast can you ride a 10 mile time trial???
    > > >
    > > >24 mph??? 28 mph??? 30 mph???
    > > >
    > > >That says a lot about where you are at. Riding at 24 mph, you probably have a lot of room for
    > > >improvement. Closer to 30 mph??? You may be getting close to your genetic potential.
    > > >
    > > >What kind of workouts are you doing??? How heavy are you???
    > > >
    > > >You will do poorly on hills until you train on them all the time. If you are losing big chunks
    > > >of time on hills, you have no choice but to work on your climbing.
    > > >
    > > >You need to do speedwork on the flats and on the hills. Concentrate on 3-5 minute efforts for
    > > >both. Go as fast as possible for 3-5 minutes. If you are doing 3-5 minute intervals and you
    > > >feel like you could do another 5 minutes, you are going too slow.
    > > >
    > > >Do some at 70-80 rpm, and also as high as 100-105 rpm. Higher rpm will stress the aerobic
    > > >system more, lower cadence will shift the burden of power output to the leg muscles, making
    > > >them stronger. You need to maximize muscle strength and aerobic/anaerobic power for optimal
    > > >performance.
    > > >
    > > >On climbs you need to also do hill sprints. Go up at a steady, hard pace, then sprint as hard
    > > >as possible both seated and standing, until you explode. Since you are on a climb where are you
    > > >going to go??? You must keep turning the cranks to keep from falling over. Gear down, recover,
    > > >and sprint again. This will make you very strong and fit. They are very difficult, make sure
    > > >you have your head into the workout before you clip into the pedals!!!
    > > >
    > > >If you are using 78+ degrees of seat tube angle, consider going down to 75 degrees if your
    > > >course has lot of climbing.
    > > >
    > > >Train on heavy 36 spoke wheels. Always. 36 spokes not 32!!! You want your training wheels to be
    > > >heavy and slow. Using expensive, trick wheels for everyday training is a crime!!! Use heavy
    > > >tubes (thornproof) and heavy tires as well. The extra weight/drag of heavy wheels will make you
    > > >stronger. When you race, put on your light/aero wheels. You will be faster, and the effort will
    > > >seem easier.
    > > >
    > > >3-5 minute efforts should be performed at very high intensity, well over 90% of max heart rate.
    > > >Start of with 1-2 to start, then work up to 4-8 intervals. Your recovery ability will determine
    > > >how many and how often you should do them. Well-trained riders can do 4-8 intervals twice a
    > > >week or so. Be sure to warmup and cooldown properly!!! Don't do them all year either. If you
    > > >feel like you are burning out, take a week or so off from these intervals, just ride easy
    > > >instead.
    > > >
    > > >Also mix in some 10-20 minute efforts (slower) once in a while, as well as 30-60 minute
    > > >efforts. You can safely substitute a 10/25 mile TT for these workouts (best).
    > > >
    > > >Good luck!!!
    > >
    > > --------------
    > > David, England
     
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