improving maximal aerobic power

Discussion in 'Power Training' started by tk_bike, Feb 18, 2005.

  1. tk_bike

    tk_bike New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2005
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    i fairly regularly perform a max test on a lode cycle ergometer at uni, i can also use this to train on.
    my last training block worked on:
    strength-endurance - 3hr hills session, riding in a very hilly area up as many hlls as i can find in a big gear cadence around 50 in the saddle, not max effort but hard.
    endurance/LT - 1*20 min effort at LT (going on HR measured in max test) as part of a long (5-6 hr ride).
    other rides were mainly steady endurance rides with 2 sessions over the 4 weeks being strength training on the ergometer - 30secs on high power (480W) at caedence of about 70 rpm with 4.30 recovery

    my max test this week showed improved LT but still quite low MAP - i completed the 340W stage but died seconds into 375.
    i was a bit disappointed cos i'm definately alot stronger sub maximally and had hoped to do a stage longer than last time but did the same.
    im a small rider (60kg) so lack power on the flat mainly, unfortunately there aren't many long climbs in UK races so to improve i need to get more power!

    for my next block i planned to broadly follow this programme:

    mon - recovery or off
    tues - hills as before but 2h
    wed - long ride (5h) with 1*20 min efort at LT early in the ride
    thurs - intervals to improve MAP
    fri - off
    sat - steady 2-3h
    sun - road race

    my question is what intervals can i do on the ergometer to improvemy max power.
    intuition says slightly greater power (110% so about 375W) for 2m on 2m off.
    thats based on needing to stress the system with sustained supramaximal efforts.

    does any one know other intervals to improve MAP?
    does this fit in ok with the rest of the plan?

    cheers

    tom
     
    Tags:


  2. Smartt/RST

    Smartt/RST New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2004
    Messages:
    266
    Likes Received:
    0
    Intervals designed to improve MAP should be 3-5min in duration and should not be performed at an average power ouptut that is significantly greater than your MAP determined from an incremental test. Work to recovery ratio is 1:1, as you planned to do, but 2min is not really long enough; this isn't a right or wrong issue per se, it just depends on what you are trying to achieve during your intervals. Shorter intervals are *likely* to be more of mix between MAP and anerobic power development.
    To better fit MAP intervals into your plan, I would recommed putting them earlier in your week when your legs are fresher, especially if this is your weakness and you are making a specific effort to improve in this area.
     
  3. Orange Fish

    Orange Fish New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2004
    Messages:
    308
    Likes Received:
    0
    do you ever diverge from the 1:1 rest:work ratio? for example, in newer cyclists or those who are just beginning this type of training leading up to their racing time of the year? maybe 1:2 or more? if not, can you explain why?
    thanks
     
  4. tk_bike

    tk_bike New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2005
    Messages:
    54
    Likes Received:
    0
    how does riding at an intensity i can already maintain improve my maximum power?how much would you say is significantly greater than current MAP? 5%, 10%?

    tom
     
  5. Smartt/RST

    Smartt/RST New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2004
    Messages:
    266
    Likes Received:
    0
    The relationship (ratio) between work and recovery interval times is based in the interplay of energy systems (aerobic, glycolytic and immediate) within the working muscles and our cardiovascular system's ability to deliver oxygen/fuel to those working muscles and remove/process the metabolic 'waste'. A ratio of 1:1 is the cornerstone for VO2max/MAP training, but no, it is not set in stone. There are also other issues to consider: such as, is the ultimate goal to maximize the stress placed on the aerobic system, the ability to repeatedly produce MAP or to mimic a goal event?
    For newer cyclists/new to VO2max/MAP training, I prefer to stick with the 1:1 ratio because this is *generally* the most appropriate way to train the physiology of VO2max/MAP. I typically find that newer cyclists who have trouble with this kind of training do so not because of the short recovery but because their intensity is too high during the work intervals.
     
  6. Smartt/RST

    Smartt/RST New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2004
    Messages:
    266
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well, just to be clear for anyone jumping in, we're talking about "maximal aerobic power (MAP)" and not just maximum power (which is the peak power you can hit during a very short sprint, ~10sec).
    Research on MAP training has shown that you can increase MAP and the ability to sustain MAP by training below (~90%) your actual MAP determined during an incremental test (if you are not an elite athlete). You are also better served by spending more total time training just below MAP, typically via intervals, than you are by increasing the intensity over MAP (asuming increasing your VO2max/MAP is your primary goal). To work at an intensity significantly above MAP (>110% is the limit we use at RST) will progressively increase the involvment of the glycolytic energy pathway and possibly decrease the benefit to the aerobic system. Although this is the % over MAP you intended to use, based on what you have said, I feel you would be better served beginning at a slightly lower intensity with the goal of spending more total time at that intensity.
    You should bare in mind that the training zones we use at RST are appropriate for an incremental test that is different than yours, so the 110% "cutoff" may not apply at all to your situation.
    http://www.cyclecoach.com/articles/?article=Power_Guidelines&ext=.htm
     
Loading...
Loading...