In dire need of advice! :)

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by AuraBoyX, Jul 29, 2005.

  1. AuraBoyX

    AuraBoyX New Member

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    I am currently in need of a new bike. Recently I have been with no car and I have to ride 5 miles to, and 5 miles back from work 5 days a week... My father gave me an old mountain bike but it is really falling apart and the local shop quoted me $150 - $200 to get it fixed. Here is the scoop of what I am looking for (keep in mind I know nothing of bikes):

    - I want something sturdy so I can ride down the road quickly, be able to go down off curbs without damaging the bike, ride through grass, pass through big sandy spots on the road without skidding.

    - I am 6'3", 180 lbs., and I NEVER sit when I ride... I am a standing rider who tends to pedal all the time (and I also like to keep it on a hard gear for most of the ride including downhill (usually I am running late for work lol).

    - I don't like 10 speeds or thin tires... They sketch me out. I dont feel safe with them (I had a little incident in the spring on my fathers 10 speed when I spun out on a sand patch (which was left from the snow sanding after the snow melted on the sides of the road, we are talking big piles of sand for 100's of feet). This is what prompted him giving me a friend an old rusty mountain bike a friend gave him.

    - And I have to admit I want a bike that I find. 'cool' and aesthetically pleasing.

    My father and I went down to the local mom and pop bike shop (the same place that quoted the fix) and they mostly sell Raleigh bikes... The shop owner tried to sell me a Raleigh bike that was around $270 before tax... The bike felt ok riding but I wasn't nuts about it. It had front suspension but no rear. (I cant remember the model).

    So then I went online and looked at bikes on Sears.com, Target and Amazon... I liked alot of the models aesthetically that they had to offer... (I also went on the Raleigh U.K. website and fell in love with alot of the Backstreet bikes they had but couldn't find any available online...)

    Anyway (thanks for reading this far, I know it's long)... I eventually stumbled upon this bike:

    Jeep Bicycle 47026-4 Jeep Cherokee Scrambler

    I really like the looks of it... (And I do like the fact it's a JEEP too:)o I admit I am falling prey to marketing but I think it's cool))...

    Amazon has this bike fairly cheap at $230... I have come to a realization that I may not need a superbike for my 50 mile/week usage on mostly pavement... But I just don't want to buy a piece of $&#@ thats going to fall apart on me as soon as I buy it.

    This is another bike I fell in love with:

    Raliegh U.K. Motomax 44107-8
    (Backstreet bikes 2nd page, bottom row 2nd from left - red one)

    I absolutely love this bike but have NO IDEA where to even start looking for it... The conversion rate (from 180 pounds) for this bike puts it around $320 US dollars... I could ask the guy from the shop who carries Raleigh. Do US vendors carry UK stuff? And if so, is it terrifically marked up? The US Raliegh website has zero cool bikes like on the UK site (which kind of blows bigtime).

    I also looked into Mongoose bikes... They any good?

    Well I appreciate any advice anyone has... From the two bikes above you can tell the style I like (in case you know any other similar style good bikes)... My price range is $300 or lower... I could be swayed to go $350. I realize some of the bikes I have mentioned are not professional but I am wondering if they will suit my needs... I don't necessarily need a professional bike, but want something sturdy and cool looking with duel suspension that I will be happy with after I buy.

    Thanks for your help in advance! :)

    Christopher
    AuraBoyX
    www.notinpublic.com
     
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  2. whackyscientist

    whackyscientist New Member

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    Sounds like you want a bike that will do EVERYTHING but won't cost you ANYTHING.:eek:

    I cannot comment on the bikes available in the USA, but from the specs on the bike, they sound cheap. Also from the conversion rate, they appear cheap.

    For the price, I believe that the dual suspension bikes will not be any good.

    Any bike brought from a bike shop should be suitable for your needs. Professionals are on hand to advise you.

    You should also consider how you are going to maintain the bike. Dirt and sand don't go well with moving parts on a bicycle. If you are not going to clean it, (and if you go through a lot of dirt and sand this would be daily), then just go for a cheap bike. When you destroy this one, then pick up another cheap bike.

    Never worry about cool a bike looks. Always let your riding take care of this aspect.

    Also, you should learn to stay seated on your bike. This allows more efficient pedalling and you will not be as tired upon arrival at your destination.
     
  3. AuraBoyX

    AuraBoyX New Member

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    Well the problem is I don't have any more money to spend... If I had the extra cash I would buy an expensive bike... But it's really not an option. I am poor :( .

    When you say you don't think they will be any good... What problems will I run into?

    They were very nice at the shop... But their selection was very very small... I should look into a larger bike store.

    You bring up a good point... I had thought of this as well. I can get the bike I like (the looks of) and just run it into the ground. And maybe get a better one later once I know more about how it feels...

    Well I don't really worry about bike looks but I am attracted to cooler looking bikes... Which make me happier on it. As for the standing. I really haul it to work and I like giving myself a workout. I feel better if I am tired upon arriving to work. :D

    I really appreciate your advice. Especially the bit about just getting a cheaper one and getting another later. It makes alot of sense especially for a novice biker like myself! :) Thanks!

    Christopher

    AuraBoyX
    www.notinpublic.com
     
  4. whackyscientist

    whackyscientist New Member

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    I understand that if you had more cash, you would buy a more expensive bike.

    But, having a more expensive bike doesnot mean it would be better.
    The best bike depends on what terrain you will be riding.
    This is where people make mistakes and problems evolve. They believe that all mountain bikes are the same or similar. Their judgemnt is on what the bike looks like (front suspension only, dual suspension etc) and they really don't look at and/or understand the components that are on the bike.
    They believe that all dual suspension bikes are built for rough terrain. This is not true. Cheap dual suspension bikes are bulit more for comfort. They are still designed for concrete paths/roads. They could also be ridden on hard gravel roads, relatively flat. What a sedan full off people could travel on, not what a 4 wheel drive could tackle.
    This is where you may run into problems. Choosing a bike that is designed for particular (and limited terrain) and thinking that it can tackle rougher terrain than what it is designed for.


    Bike shop
    Go to another. Bike shops close together usually sell different brands. This is how they can compete - via brand rather than price. If all bike shops only sold the same brands, there wouldn't be as many as everyone would buy on price, rather than service and the difference between bikes. The shop the bike is purchased from should be located conveniently. You will probably take it back to them when you need some repairs or for it to be serviced. They will appreciate your loyal support of their business.

    The bit about dirt and sand was tongue in cheek. It doesn't matter how much you spend on a bike, you should always look after it. After returning home wipe the frame over with a dry rag while checking for frame cracks and paint chips. Also check tire pressure, brake and gear functioning, clean the chain from dirt and sand and lubrication when needed (check other websites and posts on chain lube - but don't use WD40).
    You should always look after your bike.
    Imagine....... you are riding to work (late as usual from your posts) and something happens. You cannot ride the bike due to malfunction and have to walk to work (pushing the bike) You are pissed off because you are late:mad: .

    then...... you get more pissed off (as you realise or when its time for home), that you have to organise someone to pick you up (with/without the bike), give you a lift (with/without the bike), walk home (with/without the bike), and then get to work the next day/week/month until the bike is fixed or you purchase another.
    And then there is the money involved in fixing or puchasing:mad: :mad: .
    Do yourself a favour and look after it.

    Sit down to reduce your fatigue. Better for you and for the components on the bike, especially if its a cheap one.:)
     
  5. paigeo

    paigeo New Member

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    whackyscientist, I have no idea why you think you know what you are talking about when it comes to walmart vs lbs bikes (e.g. raleigh, specialized, jamis, etc.) It doesnt matter if you plan on treating your bike like crap, or if you plan on treating your bike like glass, a walmart bike is in no way a suitable substitute for a good quality bike. If a quality bike gets hell handed its way, it is going to handle it much better than a roadmaster, or a magna would. plus, warrenties and local bike shop service plans will cover most of whatever would happen to a bike that they sold. My personal experience is that when you get a great bike, you will WANT to ride. Therefore, the price of a quality bike pays itself off. Higher end mongoose bikes are okay, but not as reliable as a trek or raleigh or something of that sort. anything that says jeep, honda, or anyother CAR brand is something to stay away from. you are most likely paying for the car brand on the frame than you are conponents. my advice: save your money and get a bike from your local bike shop.
     
  6. mofo_iar

    mofo_iar New Member

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    those jeeps arent made by jeep. theyre made by cycle source company and they are CHEAP. you might look into getting a used bike. check craigslist.com for listings.
     
  7. whackyscientist

    whackyscientist New Member

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    Your absolutely correct by stating that I have no idea of walmart v's lbs bikes.;)

    That is why I stated that the bike should be purchased from a bike store with professionals available for advice. I mentioned nothing about department stores and/or the bikes they sell in my posts.

    You are interchanging CHEAP with CHEAPER. I wrote "CHEAP bike", and you are saying that I meant "CHEAPEST bike".
    Bike shops do sell CHEAP bikes. Department store bikes are the probably the CHEAPEST, but CHEAP bikes are still available at bike shops.
    Do you know that all bikes at bike shops are not the same price?
    They range from CHEAP to expensive.:)
     
  8. paigeo

    paigeo New Member

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    Sorry, my mistake. I misread your post.
     
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