Inadvertent headaches -- how long before they subside?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Rb, Dec 4, 2003.

  1. Rb

    Rb Guest

    Hello -

    Over the past year, my friend was inadvertently on a low-carb diet. "Inadvertent," because, in an
    effort to eat more healthily, he cut out a lot of bready-type/pasta type meals, and opted for salad
    wraps as a diet staple, along with bran-type cereal. For most of his life, up until his early
    twenties, he ate a super high carb diet -- white breads, pasta, and pizza all the time. For the past
    year, he's cut that way, way down.

    He's lost 5 or so pounds, which he can't afford, because now he's too skinny.

    The reason it's gotten his attention is because more recently he's been getting persistent,
    dull-headaches.

    A) Are these typically from low carb intake?

    B) If he turns the carb situation around by eating a lot more of them again, how long before the
    headaches disappear?

    Thanks,

    RB
     
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  2. Mxsmanic

    Mxsmanic Guest

    RB writes:

    > The reason it's gotten his attention is because more recently he's been getting persistent,
    > dull-headaches.
    >
    > A) Are these typically from low carb intake?

    There are lots of causes for headaches. Some diet-related causes would be hypoglycemia and
    dehydration. Both produce dull, whole-head, persistent headaches that are refractory to most
    OTC analgesics and may become "sick" headaches (producing nausea). They are easy to identify
    because a hypoglycemic headache can be eliminated by simply eating something containing a few
    carbs, and a dehydration headache can be eliminated by drinking a glass or two of water
    (depending on how dehydrated the person is). If that's what is causing the headache, it will go
    away in about 20 minutes.

    > B) If he turns the carb situation around by eating a lot more of them again, how long before the
    > headaches disappear?

    If they are hypoglycemic, 10-20 minutes.

    Note that the onset of headaches in a person past young adulthood with no prior history of headaches
    requires investigation in any case, because of the potential risk of intracranial lesions, which
    must be ruled out. Of course, if eating or drinking makes them go away, no problem. If they awaken
    him at night or vary in severity with head position or are accompanied by neurological signs,
    immediate investigation is indicated.

    --
    Transpose hotmail and mxsmanic in my e-mail address to reach me directly.
     
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