Incline % calculation

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by ewep, Aug 8, 2002.

  1. ewep

    ewep New Member

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    How does one calculate the % incline during a ride. During the Tour you heard that they were doing a 10% climb over 2km, etc. How does this work?
     
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  2. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Go buy a Heat rate moitor with altituds sensor eg(Polar S710 ) and buy me on too ;)

    It means the average gradient of that 2k climb was 10%.
     
  3. ewep

    ewep New Member

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    Got a S720. It does not give you the average climbed. How do you calculate the 10% avg. Do I take the mtrs. climbed/distance or distance/mtrs climbed?
     
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Good question.............. ???

    Climb length = 12km
    alt gained = 800m

    Would this be a 6.6% gradient?
     
  5. Eldron

    Eldron New Member

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    Steve - quite right.

    Gradient is calculated: height gained (vertical) / distance ridden (horizontal). It's a percentage so don't forget to multiply by 100...

    Ewep: 10% for 2km would be a 200m gain in vertical height (doesn't sound like a lot but 10% is an evil gradient).

    10% = 200m/2000m
     
  6. drewjc

    drewjc New Member

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    I have also wondered this for quite a while........i understand the "altitude gained" part of the equation, but is the "distance covered"=distance on the road, or horizontal distance?
     
  7. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Formula for gradient = dy/dx ; which are perpendicular measurements,
    therefore:
    gradient equals (change in vertical height) divided by (change in horizontal distance).

    But it doesn't really make that much difference for small angles like 10%. See what I mean by drawing a 90° triangle with a 10cm horizontal base and 1cm vertical height. Measure the hypotenuese (diagonal) and compare it to the 10cm base.  ;)
     
  8. Guest

    Guest Guest

    To figure grade percentages:

    http://www.computrainer.com/images/grade.jpg
     
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