Inclinometers

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Paul, Feb 22, 2006.

  1. Paul

    Paul Guest

    Does anyone know if there is a supplier of a reasonably priced cycly mounted
    inclinometer in the UK?
     
    Tags:


  2. Ben Barker

    Ben Barker Guest

  3. Jon is Away!

    Jon is Away! Guest

    Paul wrote:
    > Does anyone know if there is a supplier of a reasonably priced cycly mounted
    > inclinometer in the UK?


    How accurate does it need to be? How about some calibration lines on a
    water bottle?

    Jon
     
  4. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Paul
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Does anyone know if there is a supplier of a reasonably priced cycly
    > mounted inclinometer in the UK?


    D'oh!

    An inclinometer is definitely, 100%, guaranteed not going to work on a
    bicycle, for a reason so obvious you will see it immediately if you
    think. A gyroscopically driven artificial horizon might work.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    IMHO, there aren't enough committed Christians, but that's care
    in the community for you. -- Ben Evans
     
  5. Pinky

    Pinky Guest

    I suppose you could try a "spirit level"!!!
    :-}

    --
    Trevor A Panther
    In South Yorkshire,
    England, United Kingdom.

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > in message <[email protected]>, Paul
    > ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >
    >> Does anyone know if there is a supplier of a reasonably priced cycly
    >> mounted inclinometer in the UK?

    >
    > D'oh!
    >
    > An inclinometer is definitely, 100%, guaranteed not going to work on a
    > bicycle, for a reason so obvious you will see it immediately if you
    > think. A gyroscopically driven artificial horizon might work.
    >
    > --
    > [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    >
    > IMHO, there aren't enough committed Christians, but that's care
    > in the community for you. -- Ben Evans
    >
     
  6. BigM

    BigM Guest

  7. ian henden

    ian henden Guest

    "Paul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Does anyone know if there is a supplier of a reasonably priced cycly
    > mounted
    > inclinometer in the UK?
    >

    Whats wrong with the ones you have already?

    (knees and elbows)

    ===
    IanH
     
  8. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    BigM wrote:
    >
    > If you had the inclination you could go and have a look at these:
    >
    > http://www.roseversand.com/rose_main.cfm?KAT_ID=1295&PRD_ID=16360&spr_id=2&MID=0&CID=175
    >
    > http://www.roseversand.com/rose_main.cfm?KAT_ID=1295&PRD_ID=16359&spr_id=2&MID=0&CID=175
    >
    > Not UK but I've not seen them anywhere else - and why they are listed
    > under altimeters?
    >


    Roseversand are fine - have bought off them before and shipping to the
    UK is not a problem. Really good cheap supplier of Swiss DT spokes.

    IIRC one of the Trek cycle computers had an inclinometer function but
    you had to be moving for it to work (it worked on a combination of
    altimeter and distance measurement)

    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
  9. Paul wrote:
    > Does anyone know if there is a supplier of a reasonably priced cycly mounted
    > inclinometer in the UK?


    A tip: if you are inclined to listen to the pitch of people on this
    list, and slope off to a shop to buy one, make sure you keep a degree of
    common sense about you.

    Sorry, couldn't resist. Inclinometers won't work on bikes, as there's
    too much motion. The best you could do is a flash computer with
    altimeter and rate of climb.

    As a kid, I installed a roughness meter on my bike: a tight spring
    between the brake hoods, with a pointer in the middle indicating on a
    scale on a piece of card... utterly silly, but good fun.

    --
    Mark.
    http://tranchant.plus.com/
     
  10. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Mark Tranchant wrote:
    >
    > A tip: if you are inclined to listen to the pitch of people on this
    > list, and slope off to a shop to buy one, make sure you keep a degree of
    > common sense about you.
    >


    You're making a mountain out of a molehill

    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
  11. Paul

    Paul Guest

    On Wed, 22 Feb 2006 21:52:53 +0000, Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:

    >in message <[email protected]>, Paul
    >('[email protected]') wrote:
    >
    >> Does anyone know if there is a supplier of a reasonably priced cycly
    >> mounted inclinometer in the UK?

    >
    >D'oh!
    >
    >An inclinometer is definitely, 100%, guaranteed not going to work on a
    >bicycle, for a reason so obvious you will see it immediately if you
    >think. A gyroscopically driven artificial horizon might work.


    An inclinometer will work perfectly well on a bike.

    It might not work very well on a _moving_ bike (although if you are coasting
    downhill, or it is sufficiently damped, I can't see why it wouldn't give you a
    reasonable reading).

    However, I was actually intending to stop to take the reading. It just saves all
    the get off bike, prop up bike, get out home made inclinometer, get down on
    hands and knees ... you get the picture.

    I only want to check out my wimpishness and see just how steep the hills I feel
    I can barely handle are.
     
  12. Paul

    Paul Guest

    On Thu, 23 Feb 2006 06:35:35 +0000, BigM <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Paul wrote:
    >> Does anyone know if there is a supplier of a reasonably priced cycly mounted
    >> inclinometer in the UK?
    >>

    >
    >Hi
    >
    >If you had the inclination you could go and have a look at these:
    >
    >http://www.roseversand.com/rose_main.cfm?KAT_ID=1295&PRD_ID=16360&spr_id=2&MID=0&CID=175
    >
    >http://www.roseversand.com/rose_main.cfm?KAT_ID=1295&PRD_ID=16359&spr_id=2&MID=0&CID=175
    >
    >Not UK but I've not seen them anywhere else - and why they are listed
    >under altimeters?


    Thanks.

    I think the 'altimeter' listing is a translation mistake, since both the items
    listed in that catagory are pure inclinometers with no altimeter function.
     
  13. Tim Hall

    Tim Hall Guest

    On Thu, 23 Feb 2006 08:09:04 +0000, Mark Tranchant
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >As a kid, I installed a roughness meter on my bike: a tight spring
    >between the brake hoods, with a pointer in the middle indicating on a
    >scale on a piece of card... utterly silly, but good fun.


    I've got a similar gadget on the tandem. Looks very much like Small
    Boy. He makes an "ahhhhh" noise as we ride along. The roughness of
    the road then modulates his voice to an "ah ah ah ah ah".

    Hours of fun.


    Tim
     
  14. Richard

    Richard Guest

    Tim Hall wrote:
    > On Thu, 23 Feb 2006 08:09:04 +0000, Mark Tranchant
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>As a kid, I installed a roughness meter on my bike: a tight spring
    >>between the brake hoods, with a pointer in the middle indicating on a
    >>scale on a piece of card... utterly silly, but good fun.

    >
    >
    > I've got a similar gadget on the tandem. Looks very much like Small
    > Boy. He makes an "ahhhhh" noise as we ride along. The roughness of
    > the road then modulates his voice to an "ah ah ah ah ah".
    >
    > Hours of fun.


    Just before you hit the bumpy bits, can you say "FLASH!"?

    R.
     
  15. Clive George

    Clive George Guest

    "Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > IIRC one of the Trek cycle computers had an inclinometer function but you
    > had to be moving for it to work (it worked on a combination of altimeter
    > and distance measurement)


    The ciclosport alti ones do as well. Never seemed terribly accurate
    though...

    cheers,
    clive
     
  16. PhilD

    PhilD Guest

    Paul wrote:
    > However, I was actually intending to stop to take the reading. It just saves all
    > the get off bike, prop up bike, get out home made inclinometer, get down on
    > hands and knees ... you get the picture.



    If you want to take readings whilst stationary, how about taping (or
    otherwise fixing) a spirit level to your frame.

    (For moving, anything that relies on the movement of a liquid or mass
    will be liable to false readings whilst accellerating or decelerating.
    Bumpiness of course leads to very rapid accellerating and decelerating
    cycles).

    PhilD

    --
    <><
     
  17. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Paul
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > On Wed, 22 Feb 2006 21:52:53 +0000, Simon Brooke <[email protected].org.uk>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>in message <[email protected]>, Paul
    >>('[email protected]') wrote:
    >>
    >>> Does anyone know if there is a supplier of a reasonably priced cycly
    >>> mounted inclinometer in the UK?

    >>
    >>D'oh!
    >>
    >>An inclinometer is definitely, 100%, guaranteed not going to work on a
    >>bicycle, for a reason so obvious you will see it immediately if you
    >>think. A gyroscopically driven artificial horizon might work.

    >
    > An inclinometer will work perfectly well on a bike.
    >
    > It might not work very well on a _moving_ bike (although if you are
    > coasting downhill, or it is sufficiently damped, I can't see why it
    > wouldn't give you a reasonable reading).
    >
    > However, I was actually intending to stop to take the reading. It just
    > saves all
    > the get off bike, prop up bike, get out home made inclinometer, get
    > down on hands and knees ... you get the picture.


    What's the point then? When you're stopped, you can lay the bike down on
    its side or even turn it umop ap!sdn. Either way, you're none the wiser.
    While you're on the bike, and moving, the direction of 'down' as
    measured by the clinometer is a product of your speed and the radius of
    the turn you are negotiating, and is in any case exactly the same as the
    amount of lean required to negotiate that turn... So not only won't
    work, but redundant anyway.

    > I only want to check out my wimpishness and see just how steep the
    > hills I feel I can barely handle are.


    Ah! Pitch, not roll. OK, as you were. The answer is about 1 in 4, for an
    upright. Steeper than that and you can't keep the front wheel down.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    [ This mind intentionally left blank ]
     
  18. [email protected] (Paul) wrote:
    | I only want to check out my wimpishness and see just how steep
    | the hills I feel
    | I can barely handle are.

    But, but, that depends on which way the wind is blowing.
    You need an anemomi...anemony...anemome... wind meter on
    your bike too, and don't believe anyone who tells you it
    won't work.
     
  19. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, PhilD
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Bumpiness of course leads to very rapid accellerating and decelerating
    > cycles


    Yup. If the bump is big enough the cycle can decelerate /very/ rapidly!

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    "This young man has not the faintest idea how socialists think and does
    not begin to understand the mentality of the party he has been elected
    to lead. He is quite simply a liberal"
    -- Ken Coates MEP (Lab) of Tony Blair
     
  20. John_Kane

    John_Kane Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:
    > in message <[email protected]>, Paul
    > ('[email protected]') wrote:
    >
    > > Does anyone know if there is a supplier of a reasonably priced cycly
    > > mounted inclinometer in the UK?

    >
    > D'oh!
    >
    > An inclinometer is definitely, 100%, guaranteed not going to work on a
    > bicycle, for a reason so obvious you will see it immediately if you
    > think. A gyroscopically driven artificial horizon might work.


    I must be missing something again.
    Stick a plumb bob and a protractor on the bike. Ride bike. When
    measurement needed stop bike, read off meaurement. I am pretty sure
    that Fitzpatrick in "The Bicycle in Wartime" reposts a US army officer
    doing something similar when checking out routes for moving artillery.
    John Kane, Kingston ON Canada
     
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