Increasing Pace - Not Heart Rate

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Rupert, Sep 16, 2003.

  1. Rupert

    Rupert Guest

    Folks, Would be interested in your (constructive) feedback on where to go next in my running
    program. I am feeling pretty pleased in building up my endurance and now am doing 10 to 15km runs no
    problems - though feel pretty weary afterwards.

    At the moment I am doing a couple of 30 to 40 min runs each week, plus two longer ones 10 to 15km on
    fairly hilly terrain, either forest tracks or suburban roads.

    I am trying to keep my heart rate in the range of 120 to 160bpm which I am doing for the most part -
    though my average is sitting in the mid 150's.

    What I would like to do is to reduce my heart rate downwards and also to increase my speeds - at
    the moment ( this morning ) I did 10.5km in around 1hr 15mins - which is am not sure if that is
    good or bad...

    Any thoughts would be much appreciated.

    Cheers Rupert
     
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  2. Amh

    Amh Guest

    On Thu, 24 Apr 2003 12:18:23 +1200, "Rupert" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Folks, Would be interested in your (constructive) feedback on where to go next in my running
    >program. I am feeling pretty pleased in building up my endurance and now am doing 10 to 15km runs
    >no problems - though feel pretty weary afterwards.
    >
    >At the moment I am doing a couple of 30 to 40 min runs each week, plus two longer ones 10 to 15km
    >on fairly hilly terrain, either forest tracks or suburban roads.
    >
    >I am trying to keep my heart rate in the range of 120 to 160bpm which I am doing for the most part
    >- though my average is sitting in the mid 150's.
    >
    >What I would like to do is to reduce my heart rate downwards and also to increase my speeds - at
    >the moment ( this morning ) I did 10.5km in around 1hr 15mins - which is am not sure if that is
    >good or bad...
    >
    >Any thoughts would be much appreciated.
    >
    >Cheers Rupert

    Running faster at a reduced heart rate actually requires running for short bursts at a higher
    heart rate. Or you could just wait until your body adjusted to the activity which could take 6
    to 8 months.

    As you run more your body will naturally become more efficient. As efficiency goes up your heart
    rate will stay the same or go down and you'll become a bit faster.

    Doing a speedwork session once a week will help the body become more efficient a bit faster. On the
    day when you run 30-40 minutes pick up your pace for 3 minutes, then return to your usual pace for 2
    minutes. Keep alternating between fast for 3 minutes and easy for 2 minutes until you are about a
    mile from the end and then run easy as a cool down the rest of the way.

    More importantly why do you want to be faster and have a lower heart rate? Do you have a race in
    mind? Generally for overall fitness 30-40 minutes of aerobic exercise is fine to maintain and
    increase fitness. Running faster will not directly lead to increased fitness.

    my $0.02 Andy
     
  3. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "amh" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Running faster will not directly lead to increased fitness.
    >
    Hi Andy, Just curious-- how do you define "fitness," and why do you think that speedwork does not
    contribute to it? Regards,
    Dr. Dave
     
  4. ahass

    ahass Guest

    Running faster without increasing heartrate is the goal of everyone training to get faster. Just
    keep running at 130-150 bpm, and the more and longer you do it the more your HR will come down. A
    couple shorter runs per week around 160, or a speed workout with short bursts higher than that, will
    increase it even more. However doing high heartrate every day is counter-productive and should be
    avoided. Good luck! ANdy Hass
     
  5. Amh

    Amh Guest

    "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "amh" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > Running faster will not directly lead to increased fitness.
    > >
    > Hi Andy, Just curious-- how do you define "fitness," and why do you think that speedwork does not
    > contribute to it?

    I define fitness as the base ability to run for a bus, walk up 5 or so flights of stairs, shovel
    snow, mow a lawn, lift furniture without the likelyhood of having a heart attack. I define it as a
    general fitness that will allow a person to lead a healthly life. I really don't think that doing
    speedwork is a requirement for the defination of fitness that I gave above.

    I suppose others could call fitness the ability to run a sub 20 minute
    5k. In this case doing speedwork to maintain fitness may be a requirement.

    It is all semantics. A weightlifter would probably not call me fit since I'm not able to easily lift
    100 pounds. Understand my point of view better now?

    Andy

    > Regards,
    > Dr. Dave
     
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