Indoor Trainer(s) - Help!

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Carba_Forest, Sep 3, 2006.

  1. Carba_Forest

    Carba_Forest New Member

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    Considering the impending doom and gloom of a UK winter and its impact on outdoor training rides for road bikers (slick tyres, carbon frame, etc, etc), can anyone advise of the best indoor trainer to purchase? Additionally, what sort of cash can I expect to pay?

    Cheers - Chris 'Carba Forest'

    :confused:
     
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  2. mbergen

    mbergen New Member

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    Hi - I'm not a serious bicycler but since no one had answered you, I figured I'd post - after doing research on this question in 2004, I purchased a cycle ops fluid 2 bicycle trainer. I'd read good things about it. It cost $200 dollars (US) at that time. I have read this type can wear down the tread on the tires though - but I have my old bike in it, so it's not something I worry about. To be honest I haven't used it alot (another coatrack in my exercise room) but the amount I have - it seems very sturdy, and will let you vary the resistance by changing your gears.

     
  3. RobM

    RobM New Member

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    You'll find a lot of literature on this in the Cycling Training forum as well.

    Personally, I use the Kurt Kinetic - great resistance feel, relatively quiet, optional power and speed computer, training DVD with the package, and so on. But it's a little on the pricey side; do a fair bit of research around these forums before making your pick.

    Cheers,

    Rob
     
  4. fauxpas

    fauxpas New Member

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    There's been many trainer threads (I also had one a while ago, but have not bought one yet as I am seeking an ebay bargain).

    The name that keeps appearing as the apex trainer in the Kurt Kinetic...

    Check all the trainer threads (do a search) and that name keeps coming up again and again...

    PS. just flicked thru my mag that reviewed a dozen trainers and they said the Kurt Kinetic was the most stable and the best permanent trainer...
     
  5. Rich8P

    Rich8P New Member

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    Hi Chris,

    I've got a Tacx Roller Trainer. It has three rollers rather than a resistance and is supposed to support technique as well as fitness. I'm not sure if my technique is getting better but I can stay on it now :D , which should mean I'm more stable on the bike too.

    I paid 98 euros from bike24.de, which is online wholesale in Germany.

    The downside is that you need to practice a while before you can start hammering away at moderate pulse but hey, that's what the slightly less specific aerobic training in the gym is for, right?


    Rich
     
  6. KellyT

    KellyT New Member

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    I just bought and set up a Tacx CycleForce One, in anticipation of the even more grisly Scottish winters. It works well enough and is solidly made, my more general comments would be;

    Hate the bike you put in the trainer because trainers are not very kind to bikes. They stress the frame strangely (compared to road riding) and they shred the tyres pretty ruthlessly. (I've ordered the cheapest Raleigh, I'm fully expecting to hate that enough not to feel bad about the creaking from the frame ...)

    Even with variation in the routine (interval training etc), you can expect to be a bit bored when training. I think I will be quite likely to want to snatch rides out in any kind of suitable weather through the winter, because the trainer experience is way less fun that the 'real' thing.

    You can get the Tacx i-Magic kind of 'virtual reality' type trainer which relates your pedalling to a screen with a choice of circuits (Mont Ventoux if you're mad ...). My partner has ordered one of these, so I can't tell you what the cost / benefit balance is on that. But it's fair to say it has to be less boring than a plain trainer, but its a LOT dearer.
     
  7. vascdoc

    vascdoc New Member

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    Take a look at the Computrainer by Racermate. You can ride at least a thousand real road rides. It is amazing.
     
  8. Carba_Forest

    Carba_Forest New Member

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    Thanks for all the advice......I had no idea that these things stress/damage the bike. Is it really that bad, I'd never forgive myself (nor would my wife let me forget it), if I ruined something that's only 4 months old and cost a fair packet.

    Is an ebay 'cheapie' the best option?

    Chris

     
  9. giantdrag

    giantdrag New Member

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    Get a tacx imagic and rig it up to your computer. I too live in the gloom of the UK and was lucky if i rode my tubo once a week until a bought an imagic. Last winter I rode it 5 days a week and competed in the virtual league (still do). its great fun and highly recommended. It improves your power output as you can measure it, and this has helped improve my TT times this year by over two minutes and Ive been racing 12 years so its not that I only just started training and am still on a learning curve, it has actually had positive effects. Get a chep bike and leave it on the turbo for ease of use, but i wouldnt worry about doing damage, just think how much sress goes throught the frame when you are putting in big eforts on the road and especially uphills! They are just as damaging. For the training benefits a turbo is second to none when its P****g down and dark, and a turbo that makes it fun is even better. it'll cost you about £299 for the trainer and then its down to you what you do about a computer.

    http://www.virtualcycling.org/dnn/

    Believe me, its worth it.
     
  10. capwater

    capwater New Member

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    Here we go again with the myth that trainers damage bikes!!!!! You should not do damage to your frame so long as you don't try to sprint ala Robbie McEwan!

    As far as what type or model you have to ask yourself how much you're going to use it. I am fortunate that I can ride 12 months out of the year (well, with proper cold weather gear). Thus, I purchase a generic mag trainer from Performance Bike to use during the week when the sun isn't out to augment my training. If you are going to spend a decent amount of time on a trainer you could opt for a better quality fluid resistance model.
     
  11. joule

    joule New Member

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    I concur. Doubt any damage has been done to any bike as long as the rider has a sense of sense on the device. I'll be entering my third year using the Kurt trainer and am pleased. Use it 5+ times a week in January and Feburary. If money was no object I'd look into a CompuTrainer Lab model and try to find a fellow competitor on the web to break the bordom.
     
  12. Bro Deal

    Bro Deal New Member

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    I will put in another vote for rollers. Kreitler are the best but they are costly.
     
  13. RobM

    RobM New Member

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    Something that may well be damaged in using a non rim-drive trainer is the rear tyre; I've had the Conti GP3000s / GP4000s recommended to me as a sound tyre to use both indoors and outdoors. I'm only about 1000k into a Conti GP3000 tyre (between indoors and outdoors), but it seems to be holding up very well so far.
     
  14. typ993

    typ993 New Member

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    I put a used GP3000 from my road bike on the trainer wheel and it has been holding up fine. This is on a Performance fluid trainer.
     
  15. rjjasick

    rjjasick New Member

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    If you're just going to ride a specific trainer bike during the winter, why not get a Conti Trainer tire? Or Tacx makes them now too. Great for the trainer, but you can't ride them outside.
     
  16. Rich8P

    Rich8P New Member

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    I don't see the point in using a different bike on the trainer, unless you think that you can get the same geometry as your road bike. Just costly.

    The forces on a roadbike frame and components are much higher on the road than on the rollers. The exception is tyre carcass damage and wear because you are riding on a high friction and curved surface.

    Having said that, tyres aren't that expensive. Certainly compared to a second road bike. Reduce wear by letting the bike coast down rather than braking and you can reduce the problem of carcass overheating if you increase the pressure to maximum. Unless you fall off the rollers, you won't be needing the shock absorbsion properties of lower inflation:D . I ride my rollers with a Stelvio tyre pumped up to 10 bar then use the same tyre at 8.6 bar on the road (my body mass 86 kg).
     
  17. bobbyOCR

    bobbyOCR New Member

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    I must be one of those people who doesn't need constant stimulation. I do workouts ranging from 1 to 2.5 hours which include intervals, extended hill climb simulations using PE and a range of other things on my cycleforce Sirius. It is the most effective workout you can get and I have noticed significant benefits from using it alongside road work to boost my power.
     
  18. vascdoc

    vascdoc New Member

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  19. Powerful Pete

    Powerful Pete New Member

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    That is nothing short of heroic. A 2.5 hour ride on a trainer, staring at the wall. :eek:
     
  20. bobbyOCR

    bobbyOCR New Member

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    Yeah, it wears very VERY thin. But I am not exactly staring at the wall. I picked up a handy Iriver U10 which has a good screen and holds grand tour stages and plays them back (of course) Sit it between handlebars and watch it while killing yourself. 2.5 hours is very VERY rare though, maybe 1 a month. Hurts everywhere for a couple of days. Some people do 3 hours, that is heroic.
     
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