inertia when rowing

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by [email protected], Feb 20, 2006.

  1. In rowing movements, the most difficult part of the lift is at the end
    of the movement, ie when the bar is near your chest.

    I have realised recently that I am using inertia generated in the first
    part of the lift to help with the end part. I am not "cheating" by
    swinging my hips or using bad form, but I AM using inertia. In other
    words, if I started from a standstill half way up, I would not be able
    to bring the bar to my chest.

    Is this bad? Should I be slowing the movement right down, and lowering
    the weight to something I can pull very smoothly all the way up?

    Cheers,
    Lister
     
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  2. JMW

    JMW Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    >In rowing movements, the most difficult part of the lift is at the end
    >of the movement, ie when the bar is near your chest.
    >
    >I have realised recently that I am using inertia generated in the first
    >part of the lift to help with the end part. I am not "cheating" by
    >swinging my hips or using bad form, but I AM using inertia. In other
    >words, if I started from a standstill half way up, I would not be able
    >to bring the bar to my chest.
    >
    >Is this bad? Should I be slowing the movement right down, and lowering
    >the weight to something I can pull very smoothly all the way up?


    It's no big deal. Those last few inches of the concentric stroke
    aren't going to make much of a difference.
     
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