Info about my vintage peugeot

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Brody1975, May 28, 2010.

  1. Brody1975

    Brody1975 New Member

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    Hi I'm new to the forum, and was prompted to join by trying to get a bit more into my into cycling and find something out about a bike I have. I'm in need of a hybrid, and am trying to get a little cash together by selling my old bikes.
    My mountain bike is GT Aggressor, which is nothing special, but would probably fetch a few quid. My road bike is a vintage Peugeot 531 pro. It's 10 speed, silver frame, frame mounted gears, drop only brakes and has the words 'hand brazed' printed in a script style on the frame. Could anyone shed a little light on the age and possible value of the peugeot?
    Many thanks
     
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  2. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    You should really consider posting a picture of your Peugeot ...

    I reckon Peugeots were made with 531 tubing for at least a 10 year period ... the decals will indicate the vintage -- e.g., I think that block letters in GOLD would date the bike to the 70s. Different lettering and/or different head badge style will indicate a different period of production.

    If the condition is very good, it will be worth more than if it is in poor condition.

    Sight unseen, I would reckon the bike is worth $200(US) ... it could be worth a lot more; particularly, to the "right" buyer.

    On the other hand, if you were to ask a gotta-have-carbon weight weenie who demands the latest-and-greatest, then the bike would probably have close to zero value.
     
  3. Brody1975

    Brody1975 New Member

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    Thanks for the info - will post a pic up and look for more info on any decals I can find.
     
  4. Brody1975

    Brody1975 New Member

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    Hi, here are some pics of the bike which may help to more accurately age it and work out value etc.
     
  5. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    That's [still] a pretty nice bike! I reckon that it probably dates to the mid-90s +/- a couple of years.

    But, it's value really depends on finding the right buyer.

    If you were to part-it-out then it would certainly be worth a minimum of £150 ... again, possibly a lot more because I reckon if 'I' were 6'2" (or, taller) & looking for a steel frame that I'd be willing to pony up (or, certainly up to) £200+ just for the frame-and-fork.

    Again, the bike could be worth a lot more because the condition of the frame appears to be very good, or better.

    EXACTLY why did you want to replace it with a Hybrid?
    Did you want a 'FLAT BAR' bike or did you want a bike with fatter tyres?

    Did you want a wider gear ratio with easier gearing?
    Changing the handlebars/etc. is a simple task ... if nothing else, you could probably cannibalize your GT for the parts & sell that GT frame/wheels, separately ...

    Heck, IMO, it would be relatively EASY to change your GT to a bike with 700c wheels.

    If you want a easier gearing, that is easily accomplished with a different cassette + new chain & a new rear derailleur AND/OR a different crankset.

    Again, EXACTLY why did you want to replace it with a Hybrid?
     
  6. Brody1975

    Brody1975 New Member

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    Thanks for all the helpful info!

    Basically, I have a friend whom I go cycling with, and I'm finding any slight uneveness in the roads (I'm not talking pot holes, but just pitted tarmac) this bike feels them, and I don't want to damage it. I need something that I can go for a spin in the park with if need be but that is, performance wise a capable roadbike too. My cycling partner's father-in-law has a hybrid which is pretty decent and has hardly been used, which he is willing to part with. Also, I have little storage space for two bikes, so just having one which could do everything makes sense.
    Also I'm a poor mechanic, and it would just be simpler all round to buy this hybrid with money from these two, and save space while I'm at it.
     
  7. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FWIW. Well, one thing you could certainly do is to replace the current tyre-and-tubes with larger tyres-and-tubes ...

    The fork usually has less tyre clearance than the frame ... and, based on the picture (which may be my incorrect perception), I reckon you could install 700x28 tyres ... and, if you inflate the tyres to about 90 PSI you should have a more comfortable ride.

    Because the frame is oriented toward sportier riding (for want of a better description), the chainstays are relatively short ... BUT, there appears to be room for a larger rear tyre in you set the rear axle as far back in the dropout as it can go (there may be adjusting screws on the ends of the dropouts which will need to be loosened (or, removed & put in an envelope that you put in your 'toolbox' for future use).

    Replacing the handlebar tape with new tape may be a further benefit.

    Some people put a 'padding' beneath the tape ... etc.

    I mention these things because unless the Hybrid has a 60cm or longer top tube, it means that the frame is probably too small for you IF that Peugeot (as pictured) is set up properly for you (i.e., you are taller than 6'1") ...

    Also, a Hybrid with larger than 700x32 tyres will be lugubrious.
     
  8. Brody1975

    Brody1975 New Member

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    Thanks again, lots to think about there! I suppose I'll have to check the spec of the potential hybrid bike.
    I'm 6'0", perhaps a little taller, but I set the saddle high (perhaps a little too high) to get the full use out of my legs.

    I think part of all this is the piece of mind of buying a more modern bike, which I may hopefully be able to fund with the sale of this one, but if the frame's not suitable for me on the hybrid then yes, looking into other tyre options for this one is a possibility.
     
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