Info on Mid-80's Shimano Cluster



A

Arthur Shapiro

Guest
A coworker whose car got totalled is probably going to start riding to work
rather than being stuck on the bus. He said the bicycle had been his wife's
and not used for quite a while. I'm reasonably impressed - 9 miles each way
for a casual rider is perhaps ambitious; he'll have some hillwork no matter
what he does.

He brought the bike to work today in his wife's car, as I had said I'd happily
overhaul it for him at a mutually agreeable time. Turns out to be a 12 speed
Nishiki, primarily low-end Shimano componentry. Bearings were clearly pretty
bad, wheels somewhat out of true, but nothing obviously raising a red flag. I
put a drop of Kroil on each spoke nipple, which seemed to instantly give
positive results on the initially corroded threading.

But I was baffled by the cluster. I didn't see any splines amidst the grime.
Can anyone recall if Shimano was using freehubs in that era? I recall the old
Shimano clusters, far less prevalent than Sun Tour, tended to remove every
other tooth on the larger cogs; this guy didn't do that. So I'm really not
sure what sort of removal issues I'm up against with this old guy.

Art
 
Arthur Shapiro wrote:
> But I was baffled by the cluster. I didn't see any splines amidst the grime.
> Can anyone recall if Shimano was using freehubs in that era?


Sheldon probably has your answer. I quote:

"The older Shimano cassette sprockets used a "twist-tooth" design,
called "Uniglide." They had 9 identical splines (tabs) that would slide
into matching grooves on the freehub body. Spacer washers would fit
between each pair of sprockets. 5- and 6-speeds used 3.65 mm spacers,
7-speed generally 3.1 mm, 8-speed 3.0 mm....

The smallest sprocket on a Uniglide cassette was not splined, it was
threaded. The threads of this sprocket would hold everything else together.

To remove a Uniglide cassette, you need two chain whips, one to hold the
cassette, the other to unscrew the smallest sprocket."

Source: http://sheldonbrown.com/k7.html

--
Dave, who has not owned freehubs with < 7 cogs
dvt at psu dot edu
 
dvt wrote:
>
> "The smallest sprocket on a Uniglide cassette was not splined, it was
> threaded. The threads of this sprocket would hold everything else together.
>
> "To remove a Uniglide cassette, you need two chain whips, one to hold the
> cassette, the other to unscrew the smallest sprocket."
>
> Source: http://sheldonbrown.com/k7.html
>
> --
> Dave, who has not owned freehubs with < 7 cogs


Dave's reference is spot-on. Until the advent of Hyperglide (1988-89),
Shimano cassettes were held on by a threaded small sprocket. I had 5
and 6-speed cassettes back then, and they all were like this.

Jeff
 
Arthur Shapiro wrote:

> ...Turns out to be a 12 speed Nishiki, primarily low-end Shimano componentry.
>
> But I was baffled by the cluster. I didn't see any splines amidst the grime.
> Can anyone recall if Shimano was using freehubs in that era? I recall the old
> Shimano clusters, far less prevalent than Sun Tour, tended to remove every
> other tooth on the larger cogs; this guy didn't do that.


Some did, some didn't. Some were freewheels, some were cassette
Freehubs. That tells you nothing.

> So I'm really not
> sure what sort of removal issues I'm up against with this old guy.


Lots of people are confused by this, so I put up a special Web page to
help folks tell the difference between freewheel and cassette hubs:

http://sheldonbrown.com/free-k7

Before the advent of 7-speeds, thread-freewheels were the prevailing
system, but 6- and even 5-speed cassette Freehubs did exist with a very
small market share.

Sheldon "Freehubs Are Way Better" Brown
+-------------------------------------------------+
| Imagination is more important than knowledge. |
| --Albert Einstein |
+-------------------------------------------------+
Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041
http://harriscyclery.com
Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
 
Thanks, guys. I was hoping it would be like that, but didn't want to start
playing with the chain whips without knowing for sure that it was
appropriate.

We'll "whip" the Nishiki into shape this weekend. Hope that Shimano bb is
compatible with my old Sugino tools.

Art
 
In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

>But I was baffled by the cluster. I didn't see any splines amidst the grime.
>Can anyone recall if Shimano was using freehubs in that era? I recall the old
>Shimano clusters, far less prevalent than Sun Tour, tended to remove every
>other tooth on the larger cogs; this guy didn't do that. So I'm really not
>sure what sort of removal issues I'm up against with this old guy.


Shimano was doing freehubs in the mid-80's. The smallest cog just unscrews and
the rest of the cogs slip off the freehub. At least that is how my 7spd DA
worked back then.
---------------
Alex