Inseam Measurement?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Tom, Jun 3, 2003.

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  1. Tom

    Tom Guest

    What is the correct way to measure the inseam?

    I stood barefoot with my feet about 10" apart. AND if I used a broom stick and bring it up 'firm'
    against the crotch, it measures 87.63 cm. BUT, if I take a metal ruler "edgewise" and force it up
    against the 'pubic bone' it measures 90.00 cm. That's almost a full inch difference in inseam
    measurement.

    Which measurement should I use in determining bike size computations?

    Tom

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  2. Ken

    Ken Guest

    "Tom" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:
    > I stood barefoot with my feet about 10" apart. AND if I used a broom stick and bring it up 'firm'
    > against the crotch, it measures 87.63 cm. BUT, if I take a metal ruler "edgewise" and force it up
    > against the 'pubic bone' it measures 90.00 cm. That's almost a full inch difference in inseam
    > measurement.

    If you had to jump off your bike quickly and you landed straddling your top tube with your feet 10"
    apart, how far up your leg would like the top tube to rise before it stopped?
     
  3. tom-<< Which measurement should I use in determining bike size computations?

    Femur length, not inseam. Femur length will determine proper seat tube ANGLE and then your upper
    body/arms will determine proper top tube :ENGTH and stem length. Inseam or standover means little.
    If the seattube angle and top tube length is proper, the standover will take care of itself.

    Sizing that uses inseam is incomplete at best. For instance, two riders have the same inseam but one
    has long femurs. Long femur person cannot ride a 58cm Colnago(steep seat tube, cannot get the saddle
    back far enough)) whereas the other guy can...

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  4. Harris

    Harris Guest

    Tom <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I stood barefoot with my feet about 10" apart. AND if I used a broom stick and bring it up 'firm'
    > against the crotch, it measures 87.63 cm. BUT, if I take a metal ruler "edgewise" and force it up
    > against the 'pubic bone' it measures 90.00 cm.

    Ouch!

    > Which measurement should I use in determining bike size computations?

    The classic way of doing it is to use a hard cover book. With one edge of the book pressed against
    the wall the other edge is made parallel to the ground. Mark the spot on the wall with a pencil
    and measure.

    Art Harris
     
  5. Jason Wright

    Jason Wright Guest

    So how do you measure your femur length without an X-ray?

    Curious

    JW

    "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > tom-<< Which measurement should I use in determining bike size
    computations?
    >
    > Femur length, not inseam. Femur length will determine proper seat tube
    ANGLE
    > and then your upper body/arms will determine proper top tube :ENGTH and
    stem
    > length. Inseam or standover means little. If the seattube angle and top
    tube
    > length is proper, the standover will take care of itself.
    >
    > Sizing that uses inseam is incomplete at best. For instance, two riders
    have
    > the same inseam but one has long femurs. Long femur person cannot ride a
    58cm
    > Colnago(steep seat tube, cannot get the saddle back far enough)) whereas
    the
    > other guy can...
    >
    >
    > Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    > (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  6. Bfd

    Bfd Guest

  7. Stu

    Stu Guest

    >>Here's one way:

    >>http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/html/bikes_framesize.html

    >Okay. You have to know your saddle height. If you know your saddle height,
    read the >chart below. If you don't know your saddle height, take off your shoes, stand on a hard
    >surface with your feet 10-inches apart, and measure between your legs (the tape measure >should be
    right in the middle) from the floor to your pubic bone. Not your genitals. Hit the >bone. Figure out
    how to do this using a thin, hardcover book and a metal tape.

    >Your floor-to-pubic bone measurement is your pubic bone height.

    >example: If you are 5 feet 9 1/2, your pubic bone might be 85cm. Your
    saddle height will >be about 75cm.

    >Once you've determined your saddle height, you have a simple subtraction to
    determine a >good frame size. "A good frame size" doesn't mean it's the only size for you. The whole
    >purpose of sizing is too give you a comfortable riding position, and for most people that >means
    getting the bars level with, or within a couple centimeters, of the saddle height. The >lower the
    number you subtract, the higher the bars can be. In France or England in the
    >'40s, you'd subtract about 15cm. In the case above, that would have that
    5-foot 9 1/2 >inch rider on a 60cm frame.

    They were doing great Right up to the part where they tell you how to measure your pubic bone
    height. wall, book, tape, to easy Then they go straight from that to talking about saddle height,
    without saying anything about how to work out your saddle height from your pubic bone height. Did l
    miss something?? or do you just take off 10cm like in there example? thanks stuart
     
  8. Tom

    Tom Guest

    They just recommend taking off 10cm, although its not very clear Tom "stu" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]...
    > >>Here's one way:
    >
    > >>http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/html/bikes_framesize.html
    >
    > >Okay. You have to know your saddle height. If you know your saddle
    height,
    > read the >chart below. If you don't know your saddle height, take off your shoes, stand on a hard
    > >surface with your feet 10-inches apart, and
    measure
    > between your legs (the tape measure >should be right in the middle) from
    the
    > floor to your pubic bone. Not your genitals. Hit the >bone. Figure out how to do this using a
    > thin, hardcover book and a metal tape.
    >
    > >Your floor-to-pubic bone measurement is your pubic bone height.
    >
    > >example: If you are 5 feet 9 1/2, your pubic bone might be 85cm. Your
    > saddle height will >be about 75cm.
    >
    > >Once you've determined your saddle height, you have a simple subtraction
    to
    > determine a >good frame size. "A good frame size" doesn't mean it's the
    only
    > size for you. The whole >purpose of sizing is too give you a comfortable riding position, and for
    > most people that >means getting the bars level with, or within a couple centimeters, of the saddle
    > height. The >lower the number you subtract, the higher the bars can be. In France or England in
    the
    > >'40s, you'd subtract about 15cm. In the case above, that would have that
    > 5-foot 9 1/2 >inch rider on a 60cm frame.
    >
    > They were doing great Right up to the part where they tell you how to measure your pubic bone
    > height. wall, book, tape, to easy Then they go straight from that to talking about saddle height,
    > without saying anything about how to work out your saddle height from your pubic bone height. Did
    > l miss something?? or do you just take off 10cm like in there example? thanks stuart
    >
    >

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  9. "Femur length, not inseam. Femur length will determine proper seat tube ANGLE and then your upper
    body/arms will determine proper top tube :LENGTH and stem length. Inseam or stand over means little.
    If the seattube angle and top tube length is proper, the standover will take care of itself.

    Sizing that uses inseam is incomplete at best. For instance, two riders have the same inseam but one
    has long femurs. Long femur person cannot ride a 58cm Colnago(steep seat tube, cannot get the saddle
    back far enough)) whereas the other guy can...

    Peter Chisholm"

    So what's the poor guy supposed to do with that? It may be more accurate, but how's he supposed to
    measure his leg bones? Take them out? LOL!

    May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills! Chris

    Chris'Z Corner "The Website for the Common Bicyclist": http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  10. Chris-<< So what's the poor guy supposed to do with that? It may be more accurate, but how's he
    supposed to measure his leg bones? Take them out? LOL!

    Nope, go to somebody that has a fit cycle and sit on that to determine proper seattube angle..not
    rocket surgery or brain science..

    Inseam measurements only to determine frameset size(standover and crotch distance test)can be wildly
    inaccurate.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
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