Installing Cables With Internal Routing

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Rwm, Jul 14, 2003.

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  1. Rwm

    Rwm Guest

    I am in the process of switch a bike from flat bars to road bars. It is a Klein with internal cable
    routing and I am having trouble getting the cable through the internal runs. Does anyone have any
    suggestions that might help?

    Thanks...
     
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  2. DiabloScott

    DiabloScott New Member

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    There are two problems here: the cable is too flimsy to go where you want it to and the hole is too small. New frames come with a cable liner/guide through the holes for easy routing - you put the cable through the liner/guide and then take the liner out. If you don't have this go get some - you see it a lot on mountain bikes with exposed cables on the top tubes so bike shops have it but I don't know what it's called. It's good to have for regular cable replacement too so you can do this the easy way next time.

    First pull out the little insert from the exit hole; for rear brakes this will be the one on your top tube under the saddle. Use a needle nose pliers and try not to damage the insert or it won't stay in when you're done. Now you'll have a much bigger hole to aim for. Now poke a long piece of copper wire (thick enough to stay semi-rigid when you straighten it out) through the entry hole (with the insert still inserted) and play around with it until you get it through the exit hole (this will be MUCH easier with wire than with cable). Once you've got it through, use it to pull the cable liner/guide back through to the entrance hole and you'll be all set to feed the cable through the liner/guide. After you get the cable through replace the insert. Klein dealers can order extras of those if you do mess them up. I don't think the derailleur cables have inserts at the exit holes so you can skip that part.
     
  3. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "RWM" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I am in the process of switch a bike from flat bars to road bars. It is a Klein with internal
    > cable routing and I am having trouble getting the
    cable
    > through the internal runs. Does anyone have any suggestions that might help?
    >
    > Thanks...
    >
    >

    I've heard sucking a string through with a vacuum cleaner and then using it to pull the cable
    through works.

    Mike
     
  4. Rwm

    Rwm Guest

    Thanks, I spoke with a couple of the mechanics at my LBS. They use cable liners and a magnet to
    steer the cable. I was able to get them done with a little luck. I think that the internal cables
    are kind of silly as I never had a problem with external routing.

    "DiabloScott" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Rwm wrote:
    > > I am in the process of switch a bike from flat bars to road bars. It
    is
    > > a Klein with internal cable routing and I am having trouble getting
    the
    > > cable through the internal runs. Does anyone have any suggestions that might help? Thanks...
    >
    >
    >
    > There are two problems here: the cable is too flimsy to go where you want it to and the hole is
    > too small. New frames come with a cable liner/guide through the holes for easy routing - you put
    > the cable through the liner/guide and then take the liner out. If you don't have this go get some
    > - you see it a lot on mountain bikes with exposed cables on the top tubes so bike shops have it
    > but I don't know what it's called. It's good to have for regular cable replacement too so you can
    > do this the easy way next time.
    >
    > First pull out the little insert from the exit hole; for rear brakes this will be the one on your
    > top tube under the saddle. Use a needle nose pliers and try not to damage the insert or it won't
    > stay in when you're done. Now you'll have a much bigger hole to aim for. Now poke a long piece of
    > copper wire (thick enough to stay semi-rigid when you straighten it out) through the entry hole
    > (with the insert still inserted) and play around with it until you get it through the exit hole
    > (this will be MUCH easier with wire than with cable). Once you've got it through, use it to pull
    > the cable liner/guide back through to the entrance hole and you'll be all set to feed the cable
    > through the liner/guide. After you get the cable through replace the insert. Klein dealers can
    > order extras of those if you do mess them up. I don't think the derailleur cables have inserts at
    > the exit holes so you can skip that part.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Check out my bike blog!
    >
    > http://diabloscott.blogspot.com
    >
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  5. DiabloScott

    DiabloScott New Member

    Joined:
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    Silly? Why would you consider hiding even 1% of that beautiful Klein paint job with external cables?
     
  6. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On Mon, 14 Jul 2003 13:49:32 -0700, "RWM" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I am in the process of switch a bike from flat bars to road bars. It is a Klein with internal cable
    >routing and I am having trouble getting the cable through the internal runs. Does anyone have any
    >suggestions that might help?

    From an article I posted in 1998, found via Google:

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >Aesthetics aside, internal cables can be a pain to replace.
    >
    Good timing. At the moment I'm in the middle of a complete refurb on one of my bikes. I pulled out
    the internal brake cable thinking the old "vacuum and string" method would make replacement easy;
    although I had just read about it and never tried it. So while the previous post sat on my screen I
    went downstairs and tried it. Not as easy as I imagined, but not all that difficult. I started with
    a Dustbuster and string, and progressed in stages to a cannister vac and piece of thread. What
    eventually did the trick was tying a small paper "flag" on the end of the thread, then the vacuum
    sucked it right through the little holes.

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  7. Rwm

    Rwm Guest

    It is a nice frame, but I don't find the paint job to be museum quality...

    "DiabloScott" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Rwm wrote:
    > > Thanks, I spoke with a couple of the mechanics at my LBS. They use
    cable
    > > liners and a magnet to steer the cable. I was able to get them done
    with
    > > a little luck. I think that the internal cables are kind of silly as I never had a problem
    > > with external routing.
    >
    >
    >
    > Silly? Why would you consider hiding even 1% of that beautiful Klein paint job with
    > external cables?
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Check out my bike blog!
    >
    > http://diabloscott.blogspot.com
    >
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
  8. Eric

    Eric Guest

    "Michael Dart" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "RWM" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > I am in the process of switch a bike from flat bars to road bars. It is a Klein with internal
    > > cable routing and I am having trouble getting the
    > cable
    > > through the internal runs. Does anyone have any suggestions that might help?
    > >
    > > Thanks...
    > >
    > >
    >
    > I've heard sucking a string through with a vacuum cleaner and then using it to pull the cable
    > through works.
    >
    > Mike

    Yep. Works great for sucking coaxial cable through underground conduit as well. Sometimes works
    better with a ball of tape on the end. Use the strongest vac you can find.
     
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