Instrumentation: anyone any comments on these?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Simon Brooke, Aug 23, 2004.

  1. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    OK, I'm still thinking about instrumentation for my new bike. It's got
    to do speed, average speed, distance, all the usual things. I would
    like it to do cadence. It would be nice if it did rate of climb, but
    that's not essential. I would not like it to involve stringing tatty
    bits of wire held on with tatty bits of tape or cable ties all over my
    nice bike - the more discreet the better. And if it's going to cost a
    lot (where 'a lot' means over the sort of £35 you'll pay for a basic
    name-brand wireless job), then it has to have some really strong
    positives.

    The options as I see them are

    Campagnolo Ergobrain, about £100
    + don't have to take your hands off the hoods to change function.
    + backlight.
    - lots of tatty wire.
    - expensive.

    Cat Eye Cordless 7, about £30
    + reasonable price.
    - no cadence.

    Cat Eye CC-CD300DW, about £100
    + reasonably discreet (only one sensor unit).
    + backlight.
    - expensive.

    Mavic Wintech, about £90 with cadence kit
    + reasonably discreet - speed sensor in skewer.
    - according to reviews, can't have current and rolling average speed on
    screen at the same time.
    - expensive.

    Polar S720i, about £240 with cadence kit
    + altitude features.
    + heart rate features.
    + data logging/upload.
    + backlight.
    - plutocrats only.

    VDO MC1.0+, about £90
    + altitude functions.
    - no cadence.
    - expensive.

    Vetta V100A, price unknown as I can't find anyone who actually sells one
    + altitude functions.
    - hard to find.
    - (probably) expensive (US$160 in US).

    Any actual experience with any of these? I had almost decided on the
    Mavic before I read a review which said that you couldn't show current
    speed and rolling average at the same time, which is what I usually
    prefer to have. The Vetta seems to offer everything I want, but I can't
    find anyone this side of the Atlantic who wants to sell me one and I've
    never heard of the brand before (and the price might be scarey).

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    ;; Generally Not Used
    ;; Except by Middle Aged Computer Scientists
     
    Tags:


  2. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:

    : Cat Eye Cordless 7, about £30
    : + reasonable price.
    : - no cadence.

    I binned my one of these. I had continual problems with it.

    Speed would go 20, 20, 20, 13, 13, 20, 20 when holding a constant
    20. Which made the distance and average speed features wrong as well.

    : Polar S720i, about £240 with cadence kit
    : + altitude features.
    : + heart rate features.
    : + data logging/upload.
    : + backlight.
    : - plutocrats only.

    You can also geta power kit for this. It's another £200 or so though, but
    looks fun.

    There's various other (cheaper) HRM's that also do speed. If you don't use
    a HRM then that's no use, but if you do it helps keep your bars clear of
    clutter.

    Me? Currently I don't have a speedo on at all.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org
    "Technolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  3. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > OK, I'm still thinking about instrumentation for my new bike. It's got
    > to do speed, average speed, distance, all the usual things. I would
    > like it to do cadence. It would be nice if it did rate of climb, but
    > that's not essential. I would not like it to involve stringing tatty
    > bits of wire held on with tatty bits of tape or cable ties all over my
    > nice bike - the more discreet the better. And if it's going to cost a
    > lot (where 'a lot' means over the sort of £35 you'll pay for a basic
    > name-brand wireless job), then it has to have some really strong
    > positives.



    Cateye Astrale 8 does cadence plus all the usual. No experience of it
    though I have been thinking it would be nice.

    About 30 notes.

    T
     
  4. Clive George

    Clive George Guest

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    Ciclosport CM434 does altitude - 75 quid I think from CTC. You can get a
    cadence kit for it too.

    Anything with an altimeter (required for "It would be nice if it did rate of
    climb, but
    that's not essential.") is going to cost you.

    Does anything apart from flightdeck have virtual cadence? (ie will you need
    a cable to get cadence?)

    cheers,
    clive
     
  5. Call me Bob

    Call me Bob Guest

    On Mon, 23 Aug 2004 12:32:51 +0100, "Tony W"
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Cateye Astrale 8 does cadence plus all the usual. No experience of it
    >though I have been thinking it would be nice.
    >
    >About 30 notes.


    It's a good computer (very happy with mine) but it fails the OP's
    discrete test quite badly.

    Requires two cables to be run from the handlebar mount to the back of
    the bike. One to a crank sensor for cadence, the other to the rear
    wheel for speed/distance.
    --

    "Bob"

    'The people have spoken, the bastards'

    Email address is spam trapped.
    To reply directly remove the beverage.
     
  6. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:
    > I would not like it to involve stringing tatty
    > bits of wire held on with tatty bits of tape or cable ties all over my
    > nice bike - the more discreet the better.


    It's CF, right? Drill holes for the cable routing. ;-)
     
  7. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Simonb
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Simon Brooke wrote:
    >> I would not like it to involve stringing tatty
    >> bits of wire held on with tatty bits of tape or cable ties all over
    >> my nice bike - the more discreet the better.

    >
    > It's CF, right? Drill holes for the cable routing. ;-)


    It is, but it's monocoque. It isn't hollow (that is, I don't think it's
    hollow, although what the core material is I don't know).

    Oh, and, by the way, _I'm_ a heathen (for some value of heath; pagan
    anyway) but most people are citizens.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    IMHO, there aren't enough committed Christians, but that's care
    in the community for you. -- Ben Evans
     
  8. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    > Cateye Astrale 8 does cadence plus all the usual. No experience of it
    > though I have been thinking it would be nice.


    Great computer but not too good on the old mounting. If I ever bought
    another I'd be inclined to glue the bugger in place. It's heartbreaking
    to discover that your shiny new computer has just been flattened by a
    lorry!

    Jon
     
  9. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:

    : Oh, and, by the way, _I'm_ a heathen (for some value of heath; pagan
    : anyway) but most people are citizens.

    Way OT, but:

    Most people in the UK aren't citizens. They are subjects.

    I'm a citizen of Ireland though.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org
    "Technolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  10. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:

    > Oh, and, by the way, _I'm_ a heathen (for some value of heath; pagan
    > anyway) but most people are citizens.


    Gotcha.
     
  11. "Arthur Clune" <[email protected]> writes:

    > Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > : Oh, and, by the way, _I'm_ a heathen (for some value of heath; pagan
    > : anyway) but most people are citizens.
    >
    > Way OT, but:
    >
    > Most people in the UK aren't citizens. They are subjects.
    >
    > I'm a citizen of Ireland though.


    Funny. My passport says British Citizen.

    A
     
  12. JohnB

    JohnB Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:
    >
    > Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > : Cat Eye Cordless 7, about £30
    > : + reasonable price.
    > : - no cadence.
    >
    > I binned my one of these. I had continual problems with it.
    >
    > Speed would go 20, 20, 20, 13, 13, 20, 20 when holding a constant
    > 20. Which made the distance and average speed features wrong as well.


    I've had Cateye Cordless on three bikes for about five years now with no
    problems whatsoever - 'cept change of batteries.
    Ditto with the newer (and better looking) Cordless 7 which I've had for
    about a year on the Bike Friday.

    John B
     
  13. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Ambrose Nankivell <[email protected]> wrote:

    : Funny. My passport says British Citizen.

    Surely you are a loyal subject of Her Maj? Though a quick Google shows
    that a "British Subject" is not the same as a "British Citizen"

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org
    "Technolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  14. "Arthur Clune" <[email protected]> writes:

    > Ambrose Nankivell <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Funny. My passport says British Citizen.

    >
    > Surely you are a loyal subject of Her Maj? Though a quick Google shows
    > that a "British Subject" is not the same as a "British Citizen"
    >

    I think most people with right of abode in the UK have been British
    Citizens since 1983 when the British Nationality Act 1981 came in.

    Don't know what the difference is. Of course I'm naturally 100% loyal
    to Liz Windsor.

    A
     
  15. On 23 Aug 2004 14:01:55 +0100, Ambrose Nankivell wrote:

    > "Arthur Clune" <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >> Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>: Oh, and, by the way, _I'm_ a heathen (for some value of heath; pagan
    >>: anyway) but most people are citizens.
    >>
    >> Way OT, but:
    >>
    >> Most people in the UK aren't citizens. They are subjects.
    >>
    >> I'm a citizen of Ireland though.

    >
    > Funny. My passport says British Citizen.
    >
    > A


    So does mine, with good reason because I am one. This is another Usenet
    topic favoured by pedants. ;-)

    Here's the definition from the Passport Office website:

    > British Citizen
    > On 1 January 1983 people became British Citizens (BC) if they were citizens of the United Kingdom and Colonies on 31 December 1982 and had the right of abode in the United Kingdom on that date.
    >
    > By birth in the United Kingdom or in a place still a British colony.
    > By naturalisation in the United Kingdom or a British colony.
    > By registration as a citizen of the United Kingdom and Colonies.
    > By legitimate descent from a father* to whom the previous conditions applied.
    > *Prior to the introduction of the British Nationality Act, 1981, a person could not claim nationality from his or her mother.


    'British Subject' is a term generally reserved to people who were born
    before 1 January 1949 and who had a connection with either British India or
    the Republic of Ireland.
    --
    Michael MacClancy
    Random putdown - "Some cause happiness wherever they go; others whenever
    they go." -Oscar Wilde
    www.macclancy.demon.co.uk
    www.macclancy.co.uk
     
  16. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 23/8/04 3:02 pm, in article [email protected],
    "Michael MacClancy" <[email protected]> wrote:


    > Here's the definition from the Passport Office website:
    >
    >> British Citizen
    >> On 1 January 1983 people became British Citizens (BC) if they were citizens
    >> of the United Kingdom and Colonies on 31 December 1982 and had the right of
    >> abode in the United Kingdom on that date.
    >>
    >> By birth in the United Kingdom or in a place still a British colony.
    >> By naturalisation in the United Kingdom or a British colony.
    >> By registration as a citizen of the United Kingdom and Colonies.
    >> By legitimate descent from a father* to whom the previous conditions applied.
    >> *Prior to the introduction of the British Nationality Act, 1981, a person
    >> could not claim nationality from his or her mother.



    This does mean that if my oldest two children have children born outside of
    the British Isles with a person who is not a citizen as defined by 1-3, then
    the children will not necessarily be British.

    As it is they are British but not English, Welsh, Scots or Irish (unlike my
    youngest who is Scots by birth).

    ...d
     
  17. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Way OT, but:
    >
    > Most people in the UK aren't citizens. They are subjects.


    I had this argument with a bunch of merkins who were bitching about our
    gun laws (Don't ask!). The thing is... in the passport of any British
    subject, the nationality is listed as British Citizen, while in the
    states, they are simply American.

    > I'm a citizen of Ireland though.


    And I'm a citizen of Britain. The presence of the monarchy is largely
    figurative these days, if technically still ruling! ;-)

    Jon
     
  18. audrey

    audrey Guest

    On 23 Aug 2004 14:53:56 +0100, Ambrose Nankivell
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >> Surely you are a loyal subject of Her Maj? Though a quick Google shows
    >> that a "British Subject" is not the same as a "British Citizen"
    >>

    >I think most people with right of abode in the UK have been British
    >Citizens since 1983 when the British Nationality Act 1981 came in.
    >
    >Don't know what the difference is. Of course I'm naturally 100% loyal
    >to Liz Windsor.
    >

    British subjects are subject to immigration control and have no
    automatic right to enter the UK. British citizens do have this right.
    That's the key difference.


    --

    email = audmacd aaatttt hhhottt mmmaailll dddoottt ccccoommm
     
  19. audrey

    audrey Guest

    On Mon, 23 Aug 2004 15:20:51 +0100, Jon Senior
    <[email protected]_DOT_co_DOT_uk.remove> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >> Way OT, but:
    >>
    >> Most people in the UK aren't citizens. They are subjects.

    >
    >I had this argument with a bunch of merkins who were bitching about our
    >gun laws (Don't ask!). The thing is... in the passport of any British
    >subject, the nationality is listed as British Citizen, while in the
    >states, they are simply American.
    >

    that's because there are several kinds of British nationality, so to
    simply list a person's nationality as 'British' would not be
    sufficient information. They have to specify what kind of British you
    are because only 1 kind (British citizen) gives you the right to live
    in the UK free from immigration controls.


    --

    email = audmacd aaatttt hhhottt mmmaailll dddoottt ccccoommm
     
  20. On Mon, 23 Aug 2004 15:20:51 +0100, Jon Senior wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >> Way OT, but:
    >>
    >> Most people in the UK aren't citizens. They are subjects.

    >
    > I had this argument with a bunch of merkins who were bitching about our
    > gun laws (Don't ask!). The thing is... in the passport of any British
    > subject, the nationality is listed as British Citizen,


    Sorry Jon, but you're wrong there. There are plenty of British subjects
    who are not British citizens so to say 'in the passport of any British
    subject' is false. It may be true to say that all British Citizens are
    also British subjects but this is to use 'subject' in a different way to
    the way it's used in the nationality laws.
    >
    >> I'm a citizen of Ireland though.

    >
    > And I'm a citizen of Britain.


    You're actually a citizen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and
    Northern Ireland.

    Musn't forget the Irish, you know!



    --
    Michael MacClancy
    Random putdown - "He loves nature in spite of what it did to him." -
    Forrest Tucker
    www.macclancy.demon.co.uk
    www.macclancy.co.uk
     
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