Instrumentation: anyone any comments on these?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Simon Brooke, Aug 23, 2004.

  1. davek

    davek Guest

    Call me Bob wrote:
    > Requires two cables to be run from the handlebar mount to the back of
    > the bike. One to a crank sensor for cadence, the other to the rear
    > wheel for speed/distance.


    I have the speed cable going to the front wheel - but then I don't use a
    turbo so can get away with it.

    I can live with the messy wires, but then I don't have a beautiful
    carbon Dolan frame.

    d.
     


  2. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Arthur Clune
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > : Oh, and, by the way, _I'm_ a heathen (for some value of heath; pagan
    > : anyway) but most people are citizens.
    >
    > Way OT, but:
    >
    > Most people in the UK aren't citizens. They are subjects.


    Dear heart, I wasn't referring to any newfangled meaning which has
    lately become associated with the word. A citizen is one who lives in a
    city; a heathen is one who lives on a heath; and a pagan is one who
    lives in the countryside. And if anyone refers to me as a subject I'll
    object.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
     
  3. davek

    davek Guest

    Simon Brooke wrote:
    > And if anyone refers to me as a subject I'll
    > object.


    Ace. I /love/ grammar jokes.

    d.
     
  4. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    Michael MacClancy [email protected] opined the following...
    > Sorry Jon, but you're wrong there. There are plenty of British subjects
    > who are not British citizens so to say 'in the passport of any British
    > subject' is false. It may be true to say that all British Citizens are
    > also British subjects but this is to use 'subject' in a different way to
    > the way it's used in the nationality laws.


    OK, so I forgot that bit.

    > > And I'm a citizen of Britain.

    >
    > You're actually a citizen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and
    > Northern Ireland.


    But I'm also a British citizen... how much more confusing can we make
    this?

    > Musn't forget the Irish, you know!


    Give Ireland back to the Irish! It all get much easier then. ;-)

    Jon
     
  5. Steve Peake

    Steve Peake Guest

    On Mon, 23 Aug 2004 13:30:54 GMT, JohnB wrote:

    > I've had Cateye Cordless on three bikes for about five years now with no
    > problems whatsoever - 'cept change of batteries.
    > Ditto with the newer (and better looking) Cordless 7 which I've had for
    > about a year on the Bike Friday.


    I had the original cordless, which was okay, the cordless 2 was useless in
    cold weather though.

    The Aldi model is very good, yet to see that in colder weather though, I'm
    hoping the larger battery will increase the range.

    Steve
     
  6. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Dear heart, I wasn't referring to any newfangled meaning which has
    > lately become associated with the word. A citizen is one who lives in a
    > city; a heathen is one who lives on a heath; and a pagan is one who
    > lives in the countryside. And if anyone refers to me as a subject I'll
    > object.


    You refer to me as an object & I will subject you to ablative pain :~)

    T
     
  7. Glm

    Glm Guest

    On Mon, 23 Aug 2004 11:05:09 GMT, Simon Brooke <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    > Polar S720i, about £240 with cadence kit
    > + altitude features.
    > + heart rate features.
    > + data logging/upload.
    > + backlight.
    > - plutocrats only.
    >


    Have had good experience with the S725 (according to Polar's web site, the
    S720 does not record altitude). Got an S520 for a friend of mine - it's
    somewhat cheaper than the S72x and it does everything you'd want (apart
    from altitude). Might be worth looking into.

    Friends tell me that the Power kit is a waste of time, but I have no
    personal experience of it.


    Glm
     
  8. David

    David Guest

    "Arthur Clune" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > : Cat Eye Cordless 7, about £30
    > : + reasonable price.
    > : - no cadence.
    >
    > I binned my one of these. I had continual problems with it.
    >
    > Speed would go 20, 20, 20, 13, 13, 20, 20 when holding a constant
    > 20. Which made the distance and average speed features wrong as well.
    >

    I have one of these and it is very susceptable to interference from
    pylons, trams, bridges etc. I have seen the same behaviour. Its even
    worse when I have my GPS switched on too....

    Dave
     
  9. Ian Toyn

    Ian Toyn Guest

    Arthur Clune wrote:
    > Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > : Cat Eye Cordless 7, about £30
    > : + reasonable price.
    > : - no cadence.
    >
    > I binned my one of these. I had continual problems with it.
    >
    > Speed would go 20, 20, 20, 13, 13, 20, 20 when holding a constant
    > 20. Which made the distance and average speed features wrong as well.


    I had that problem. Determined that the sensor was
    to blame not the computer, but never fixed it.
    So like Arthur I rode without a computer until 8 weeks ago...

    I got an Echo Wireless from Mike Dyason - not on Simon's
    list, but worth considering. Compared to the Cateye 7,
    I think it has all the same features, and these differences.
    Cons: physically less sleek, but small enough.
    Pros: detects when it's on the handlebar mount, and ignores
    transmissions when it isn't - claims to save battery.
    Also claims to be more waterproof.
    Available in black (to match Simon's Dolan frame).
    There's a silver one on the left of this pic...
    http://www.cycleworkshop.com/pict42.jpg
    ....think black, with the button in bright red.
    Compared to the others on Simon's list, it has none
    of the fancy features (cadence, altitude, heart rate),
    but it is the cheapest. There's a variant with cadence,
    but that's wired. The magnet was relatively chunky,
    so I'm using the 7's magnet - works well so far.

    ian
     
  10. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Ian Toyn
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Compared to the others on Simon's list, it has none
    > of the fancy features (cadence, altitude, heart rate),
    > but it is the cheapest. There's a variant with cadence,
    > but that's wired.


    It's amazing, actually, how many computers there are out there which
    have wireless speed but wired cadence sensors. I would have thought
    that anyone who wanted wireless speed, and also wanted cadence, would
    want wireless cadence.

    .... and to add to the saga, I switched my old faithful Specialized
    cordless onto the Dolan yesterday, and it was working fine, but the
    clock was wrong. So I took out the battery to reset it, and went
    through the set up process and got the clock right, but found I'd set
    it to Km rather than miles. So I took the battery out again to reset it
    so I could go through setup again... and now it's sulking and won't
    work at all - I think I may have knackered it. So I definitely need a
    new instrument.

    Bother.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    Error 1109: There is no message for this error
     
  11. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:

    : It's amazing, actually, how many computers there are out there which
    : have wireless speed but wired cadence sensors.

    It's not that amazing - it's rather further from the chainstay to the
    bars than from the top of the front frok.

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org
    "Technolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  12. "Arthur Clune" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > : It's amazing, actually, how many computers there are out there which
    > : have wireless speed but wired cadence sensors.
    >
    > It's not that amazing - it's rather further from the chainstay to the
    > bars than from the top of the front frok.


    And isn't there the added complication of manufacturing a unit that
    uses 2 different frequencies, so that the transponders don't get
    confused between cadence and speed measurements?

    David E. Belcher
     
  13. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, David E.
    Belcher ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > "Arthur Clune" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >> Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> : It's amazing, actually, how many computers there are out there
    >> : which have wireless speed but wired cadence sensors.
    >>
    >> It's not that amazing - it's rather further from the chainstay to the
    >> bars than from the top of the front frok.

    >
    > And isn't there the added complication of manufacturing a unit that
    > uses 2 different frequencies, so that the transponders don't get
    > confused between cadence and speed measurements?


    I'd assume in this day and age you'd use Bluetooth or even RFID
    technology and disambiguate that on the packet headers. The chips cost
    pence.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; Usenet: like distance learning without the learning.
     
  14. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:

    : I'd assume in this day and age you'd use Bluetooth or even RFID
    : technology and disambiguate that on the packet headers. The chips cost
    : pence.

    I think you're hoping :)

    No bike computers use RFID. Dunno about bluetooth - what's the range? I
    agree that you'd just use one frequency though.

    My basic point stands though - most wireless computers have a very underpower
    transmitter because

    a) it'll make the batteries last longer
    b) it won't interfere with the one next to it without bothering with fancy
    coded signals
    c) it's cheaper (see b)

    Hence the signal only just reaches from the top of the forks to the bars on large
    size bikes.

    Getting a wireless signal from the BB area to the bars requires making the whole
    thing rather more expensive.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org
    "Technolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  15. sdorrity

    sdorrity New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2003
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    Just to put a spanner in the works I am a British Citizen (According to my Passport) but am not a resident nor were born in Great Britain NOR Northern Ireland. As a pure Guernseyman I am not entitled to reside and work in the EU, BUT can reside and work in the UK.

    We are not governed by the UK government, but do share the same monarch (courtesy of william the conqueror et al)

    To bring it slightly on topic I've just ordered a Polar s720i, ex VAT of course ;-) and am eagerly awaiting its delivery. I'll report back when I've got it going.

    Steve D

    ps
    note to GLM:
    The s720i does have altitude and temp according to Polar UK
     
  16. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Arthur Clune
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > : I'd assume in this day and age you'd use Bluetooth or even RFID
    > : technology and disambiguate that on the packet headers. The chips
    > : cost pence.
    >
    > I think you're hoping :)
    >
    > No bike computers use RFID. Dunno about bluetooth - what's the range?
    > I agree that you'd just use one frequency though.


    Well, quite a lot of them now claim to be 'digital', so they're using
    _something_.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    See one nuclear war, you've seen them all.
     
  17. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 25/8/04 10:35 am, in article
    [email protected], "Simon Brooke"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Well, quite a lot of them now claim to be 'digital', so they're using
    > _something_.


    You change settings using your finger. That sounds digital to me.

    Also the readout is digits, not dials..

    ...d
     
  18. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    David Martin wrote:
    > On 25/8/04 10:35 am, in article
    > [email protected], "Simon Brooke"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:


    >>Well, quite a lot of them now claim to be 'digital', so they're using
    >>_something_.


    > You change settings using your finger. That sounds digital to me.
    >
    > Also the readout is digits, not dials..


    Which is quite possibly enough to make it "digital", since "digital"
    often means marketing speak for inferring "super cool cutting edge very
    good technology" these days.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  19. Nick Kew

    Nick Kew Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Peter Clinch <[email protected]> writes:

    > Which is quite possibly enough to make it "digital", since "digital"
    > often means marketing speak for inferring "super cool cutting edge very
    > good technology" these days.


    You're 30 years out of date. The original Hitchhikers Guide sent that
    up back in the 1970s.

    --
    Nick Kew
     
  20. Mark South

    Mark South Guest

    "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    > I'd assume in this day and age you'd use Bluetooth or even RFID
    > technology and disambiguate that on the packet headers. The chips cost
    > pence.


    A friend of mine designs Bluetooth chips. The power consumption is still way
    beyond that of a typical bike computer. (There is a lot of other stuff going on
    to do with detection of devices for example.) The main design effort is to do
    with power consumption.

    Now if you ran the computer console from a SON hub....
    --
    Mark South, Super Genius: World Citizen, Net Denizen
     
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