Insurance and Massage

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by John Smith, Mar 14, 2004.

  1. John Smith

    John Smith Guest

    Does anyone receive payment for massage therapy from any of
    the health plans? Or do you have a client who's health plan
    reimburses them for partial or full payment for massage
    therapy received?

    JS
     
    Tags:


  2. Tiffany

    Tiffany Guest

    Reimburses, yes.

    T John Smith <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Does anyone receive payment for massage therapy from any
    > of the health plans? Or do you have a client who's health
    > plan reimburses them for partial or full payment for
    > massage therapy received?
    >
    > JS
     
  3. Douglas

    Douglas Guest

    M.V.A. insurance plans pay our clinic. Extended health care
    plans are the responsibility of the client.

    D; "Tiffany" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Reimburses, yes.
    >
    > T John Smith <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Does anyone receive payment for massage therapy from any
    > > of the health plans? Or do you have a client who's
    > > health plan reimburses them for partial or full payment
    > > for massage therapy received?
    > >
    > > JS
    >
     
  4. John Smith

    John Smith Guest

    M.V.A. insurance?

    What did your clients have to do to get massage paid for by
    insurance?

    JS

    douglas wrote:
    > M.V.A. insurance plans pay our clinic. Extended health
    > care plans are the responsibility of the client.
    >
    > D; "Tiffany" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>Reimburses, yes.
    >>
    >>T John Smith <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >>>Does anyone receive payment for massage therapy from any
    >>>of the health plans? Or do you have a client who's health
    >>>plan reimburses them for partial or full payment for
    >>>massage therapy received?
    >>>
    >>>JS
    >>>
    >>
    >>
     
  5. Mj Hess

    Mj Hess Guest

    MVA, Motor Vehicle Accident.. sounds like the auto insurance
    possibly paid it as part of the recovery process from
    injuries received. We're being taught some re: Personal
    Injury, Worker's comp, and Private Health Insurance
    documentation.. but will be glad here when MT is licensed.
    One of the major ins. carriers in Michigan already has a
    long list of Preferred Providers of Massage Therapy.. Not
    sure of their coverage and curious about the answer you'll
    get to your question, JS.

    "John Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > M.V.A. insurance?
    >
    > What did your clients have to do to get massage paid for
    > by insurance?
    >
    > JS
    >
    > douglas wrote:
    > > M.V.A. insurance plans pay our clinic. Extended health
    > > care plans are the responsibility of the client.
    > >
    > > D; "Tiffany" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > >>Reimburses, yes.
    > >>
    > >>T John Smith <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >>news:[email protected]...
    > >>
    > >>>Does anyone receive payment for massage therapy from
    > >>>any of the health plans? Or do you have a client who's
    > >>>health plan reimburses them for partial or full payment
    > >>>for massage therapy received?
    > >>>
    > >>>JS
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >
     
  6. Douglas

    Douglas Guest

    Our health systems are different- compared to the U.S.
    As part of the clients (auto) insurance policy, a treatment plan can be
    sumitted and approved.
    Up here a clients extended healthcare must be exhausted before an automobile
    insurance company will pick up the tab on an approved treatment plan.
    Our Workman's Comp coverage really bites, it is not worth the therapists
    effort.
    Workman's Comp will only pay $14.85 per session.
    In that respect it is ass backwards.
    Sometimes the people who really need help can't get it. And that is
    shamefull..
    "Mj Hess" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > MVA, Motor Vehicle Accident.. sounds like the auto
    > insurance possibly paid it as part of the recovery process
    > from injuries received. We're being taught some re:
    > Personal Injury, Worker's comp, and Private Health
    Insurance
    > documentation.. but will be glad here when MT is licensed.
    > One of the
    major
    > ins. carriers in Michigan already has a long list of
    > Preferred Providers
    of
    > Massage Therapy.. Not sure of their coverage and curious
    > about the answer you'll get to your question, JS.
    >
    >
    > "John Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > M.V.A. insurance?
    > >
    > > What did your clients have to do to get massage paid for
    > > by insurance?
    > >
    > > JS
    > >
    > > douglas wrote:
    > > > M.V.A. insurance plans pay our clinic. Extended health
    > > > care plans are the responsibility of the
    > > > client.
    > > >
    > > > D; "Tiffany" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > > message news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > >>Reimburses, yes.
    > > >>
    > > >>T John Smith <[email protected]> wrote in message news-
    > > >>:[email protected]
    > > >>
    > > >>>Does anyone receive payment for massage therapy from
    > > >>>any of the
    health
    > > >>>plans? Or do you have a client who's health plan
    > > >>>reimburses them for partial or full payment for
    > > >>>massage therapy received?
    > > >>>
    > > >>>JS
    > > >>>
    > > >>
    > > >>
    > > >
    > > >
    >
     
  7. George

    George Guest

    "Mj Hess" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > <<<SNIP>>> One of the major ins. carriers in Michigan
    > already has a long list of Preferred Providers
    of
    > Massage Therapy.. Not sure of their coverage and curious
    > about the answer you'll get to your question, JS.
    >
    >
    If that is MCare you're referring to, I believe all they do
    is put anyone on the list who asks and in exchange for being
    listed the provider agrees to give MCare subscribers a 20%
    discount (or something like that). There are about 25 local
    providers (to me) with only one of them on the list. Guess
    it's OK for someone looking to build up his/her client base.

    George
     
  8. John Smith

    John Smith Guest

    Do you charge the client full fare for a workman's comp
    massage and let them pay the difference between the 14.85
    and the total?

    JS

    douglas wrote:
    > Our health systems are different- compared to the U.S. As
    > part of the clients (auto) insurance policy, a treatment
    > plan can be sumitted and approved. Up here a clients
    > extended healthcare must be exhausted before an automobile
    > insurance company will pick up the tab on an approved
    > treatment plan. Our Workman's Comp coverage really bites,
    > it is not worth the therapists effort. Workman's Comp will
    > only pay $14.85 per session. In that respect it is ass
    > backwards. Sometimes the people who really need help can't
    > get it. And that is shamefull..
     
  9. Douglas

    Douglas Guest

    Yes.
    It is their responsibility to pay the difference.
    We in Ontario have a provincial health insurance plan ( O.H.I.P.), when you
    go to visit a doctor the province will pick up the tab.
    When you go to see a chiropractor the province will pay $9.95 for that visit
    while you pay the difference to a maximum of $ 150.00 per year.
    The chiropractor where I practice charges $29.95 per visit.
    We in the massage therapy profession, unfortunately are not within this
    plan.
    We have been lobbying for many years to be recognized.
    Because as we all know the benifits of massage therapy.
    Some emoployee benifit plans are great while others are not. It varries
    quite a bit from full to partial coverage.
    "John Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Do you charge the client full fare for a workman's comp
    > massage and let them pay the difference between the 14.85
    > and the total?
    >
    > JS
    >
    > douglas wrote:
    > > Our health systems are different- compared to the U.S.
    > > As part of the clients (auto) insurance policy, a
    > > treatment plan can be sumitted and approved. Up here a
    > > clients extended healthcare must be exhausted before an
    automobile
    > > insurance company will pick up the tab on an approved
    > > treatment plan. Our Workman's Comp coverage really
    > > bites, it is not worth the therapists effort. Workman's
    > > Comp will only pay $14.85 per session. In that respect
    > > it is ass backwards. Sometimes the people who really
    > > need help can't get it. And that is shamefull..
     
  10. Mj Hess

    Mj Hess Guest

    "douglas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Our health systems are different- compared to the U.S. As
    > part of the clients (auto) insurance policy, a treatment
    > plan can be sumitted and approved. Up here a clients
    > extended healthcare must be exhausted before an
    automobile
    > insurance company will pick up the tab on an approved
    > treatment plan. Our Workman's Comp coverage really bites,
    > it is not worth the therapists effort. Workman's Comp will
    > only pay $14.85 per session. In that respect it is ass
    > backwards. Sometimes the people who really need help can't
    > get it. And that is shamefull..

    I agree! Much of the alternative treatments, in the US,
    are not covered and only available (for the most part) to
    the affluent in society. (with the exception of a few
    student clinics here and there, but they do not specialize
    in say.. Acupuncture, Rolfing, DT, Chiropractic, etc.) It
    IS shameful.

    mj
     
  11. Mj Hess

    Mj Hess Guest

    Not familiar with the MCare list, but good to know! The list I saw was
    actually through an HMO my folks are part of..which is part of the Blue Care
    Network. Hopefully, this new licensing will affect change in provider
    listing in a very positive way.
    mj
    "George" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Mj Hess" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > <<<SNIP>>> One of the major ins. carriers in Michigan
    > > already has a long list of Preferred Providers
    > of
    > > Massage Therapy.. Not sure of their coverage and curious
    > > about the
    answer
    > > you'll get to your question, JS.
    > >
    > >
    > If that is MCare you're referring to, I believe all they
    > do is put anyone
    on
    > the list who asks and in exchange for being listed the
    > provider agrees to give MCare subscribers a 20% discount
    > (or something like that). There are about 25 local
    > providers (to me) with only one of them on the list.
    > Guess it's OK for someone looking to build up his/her
    > client base.
    >
    > George
     
  12. Jeremy

    Jeremy Guest

    > > If that is MCare you're referring to, I believe all they
    > > do is put anyone
    > on
    > > the list who asks and in exchange for being listed the
    > > provider agrees to give MCare subscribers a 20% discount
    > > (or something like that).

    Just a quick note on these so-called "insurance plans" where
    the MT gets a listing in the provider book and the
    subscriber gets a discount. Several MTs in my area are in
    this type of arrangement. The insurance company is really
    the one making out since they get the extra premium monies
    from their subscribers that sign up for it. The subscriber
    gets a special card which when presented at the therapist's
    office at the time of the session, the MT discounts their
    session fee anywhere from 15-30%. They have agreed to do
    this by signing a contract saying they will. In my never to
    humble opinion, the insurance companies have found a way to
    get out of actually covering Massage Therapy as the health
    care profession that it is and relagated us to the fringes
    of coverage, through this discount program. They have lumped
    us into an "Alternative" health care instead of allowing us
    our place in the Integrated Health care system that we
    deserve. The other part of this is, does anyone else find it
    a little ethically shady to offer a discount to one group of
    clients and not to another? I understand the argument that
    the discounted fee could constitute the same costs as paying
    for advertising, but it still doesn't seem quite kosher.

    In the insurance billing I have done, the personal injury
    cases (Previously refered to as MVA cases) have worked out
    the best reimbursement wise. The client must be referred by
    a doctor, because in all the cases with which I have worked,
    the MT must have a diagnosis to work on. And since we as MTs
    cannot diagnose, its got to come from the doctor. The cases
    I have worked have been some of the most rewarding I have
    ever done, both monetarily and otherwise. The referral from
    the doc's have the client coming in for Soft Tissue
    Mobilization or Massage Therapy "3x per week for 3 weeks, 2x
    per week for 3 weeks and 1x per week for 5 weeks" or similar
    to that. The results you can acheive with a client's
    condition seeing them with that kind of regularity is
    astounding! It has been those clients that I think of when I
    think of my successes as a MT.

    By refusing to take part in the discount "insurance"
    programs, we can send a strong message to the insurance
    company that we deserve to be at the table and are not
    willing to settle for the scraps.
     
  13. Douglas

    Douglas Guest

    In Ontario we are regulated. Very similar to your post.
    W.S.I.B will only pay partial, It is up to the C to pay the
    balance. We are NOT allowed to provide Massage Therapy
    at a "discount".
    W.S.J.'s can be rewarding, but for me they are only
    rewarding if the client actually wants to get better.
    I'm sure you can pick out a mallingorer as easily as I
    can.( proper testing)

    All our Health plans personal or otherwise are different, we
    as Therapists provide a receipt for services rendered and it
    is up to the client to seek reimbursment.

    The C.M.T.O is trying to do exactly that.........No scraps

    W.T. D "Jeremy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news-
    :[email protected]
    > > > If that is MCare you're referring to, I believe all
    > > > they do is put
    anyone
    > > on
    > > > the list who asks and in exchange for being listed the
    > > > provider agrees
    to
    > > > give MCare subscribers a 20% discount (or something
    > > > like that).
    >
    > Just a quick note on these so-called "insurance plans"
    > where the MT gets a listing in the provider book and the
    > subscriber gets a discount. Several MTs in my area are in
    > this type of arrangement. The insurance company is really
    > the one making out since they get the extra premium
    > monies from their subscribers that sign up for it. The
    > subscriber gets a special card which when presented at
    > the therapist's office at the time of the session, the MT
    > discounts their session fee anywhere from 15-30%. They
    > have agreed to do this by signing a contract saying they
    > will. In my never to humble opinion, the insurance
    > companies have found a way to get out of actually
    > covering Massage Therapy as the health care profession
    > that it is and relagated us to the fringes of coverage,
    > through this discount program. They have lumped us into
    > an "Alternative" health care instead of allowing us our
    > place in the Integrated Health care system that we
    > deserve. The other part of this is, does anyone else find
    > it a little ethically shady to offer a discount to one
    > group of clients and not to another? I understand the
    > argument that the discounted fee could constitute the
    > same costs as paying for advertising, but it still
    > doesn't seem quite kosher.
    >
    > In the insurance billing I have done, the personal injury
    > cases (Previously refered to as MVA cases) have worked out
    > the best reimbursement wise. The client must be referred
    > by a doctor, because in all the cases with which I have
    > worked, the MT must have a diagnosis to work on. And since
    > we as MTs cannot diagnose, its got to come from the
    > doctor. The cases I have worked have been some of the most
    > rewarding I have ever done, both monetarily and otherwise.
    > The referral from the doc's have the client coming in for
    > Soft Tissue Mobilization or Massage Therapy "3x per week
    > for 3 weeks, 2x per week for 3 weeks and 1x per week for 5
    > weeks" or similar to that. The results you can acheive
    > with a client's condition seeing them with that kind of
    > regularity is astounding! It has been those clients that I
    > think of when I think of my successes as a MT.
    >
    > By refusing to take part in the discount "insurance"
    > programs, we can send a strong message to the insurance
    > company that we deserve to be at the table and are not
    > willing to settle for the scraps.
     
  14. L Kelly

    L Kelly Guest

    Well said....... "By refusing to take part in the discount
    "insurance" programs, we can send a strong message to the
    insurance company that we deserve to be at the table and are
    not willing to settle for the scraps."

    When you sign the contract, are you able to legally end it
    within a few days from the time you write to them or do they
    make you hang in for a month or so?

    Anyone here do medicare massage in Pennsylvania? Am
    interested in laws concerning. LK

    ***** Please....If you don't have an up-to-date antivirus
    program running, please take my email address out of your
    addressbook and anywhere else it might be lurking on your
    computer. Thank you so much. LK http://www.icdc.com/~drkell-
    y/chiropractorphiladelphia803.htm "Jeremy"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > > > If that is MCare you're referring to, I believe all
    > > > they do is put
    anyone
    > > on
    > > > the list who asks and in exchange for being listed the
    > > > provider agrees
    to
    > > > give MCare subscribers a 20% discount (or something
    > > > like that).
    >
    > Just a quick note on these so-called "insurance plans"
    > where the MT gets a listing in the provider book and the
    > subscriber gets a discount. Several MTs in my area are in
    > this type of arrangement. The insurance company is really
    > the one making out since they get the extra premium
    > monies from their subscribers that sign up for it. The
    > subscriber gets a special card which when presented at
    > the therapist's office at the time of the session, the MT
    > discounts their session fee anywhere from 15-30%. They
    > have agreed to do this by signing a contract saying they
    > will. In my never to humble opinion, the insurance
    > companies have found a way to get out of actually
    > covering Massage Therapy as the health care profession
    > that it is and relagated us to the fringes of coverage,
    > through this discount program. They have lumped us into
    > an "Alternative" health care instead of allowing us our
    > place in the Integrated Health care system that we
    > deserve. The other part of this is, does anyone else find
    > it a little ethically shady to offer a discount to one
    > group of clients and not to another? I understand the
    > argument that the discounted fee could constitute the
    > same costs as paying for advertising, but it still
    > doesn't seem quite kosher.
    >
    > In the insurance billing I have done, the personal injury
    > cases (Previously refered to as MVA cases) have worked out
    > the best reimbursement wise. The client must be referred
    > by a doctor, because in all the cases with which I have
    > worked, the MT must have a diagnosis to work on. And since
    > we as MTs cannot diagnose, its got to come from the
    > doctor. The cases I have worked have been some of the most
    > rewarding I have ever done, both monetarily and otherwise.
    > The referral from the doc's have the client coming in for
    > Soft Tissue Mobilization or Massage Therapy "3x per week
    > for 3 weeks, 2x per week for 3 weeks and 1x per week for 5
    > weeks" or similar to that. The results you can acheive
    > with a client's condition seeing them with that kind of
    > regularity is astounding! It has been those clients that I
    > think of when I think of my successes as a MT.
    >
    > By refusing to take part in the discount "insurance"
    > programs, we can send a strong message to the insurance
    > company that we deserve to be at the table and are not
    > willing to settle for the scraps.
     
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