intensity??

Discussion in 'Power Training' started by Robert West, Dec 15, 2004.

  1. Robert West

    Robert West New Member

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    Should all intensity be removed from training this time of your in favour of sub LT intervals and easy rides? or should the intensity just be be down sized to maybe once a week?
     
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  2. Steve McGregor

    Steve McGregor New Member

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    Depends.

    Just kidding, but it really does. That is really a coaching philosophy question. Some coaches are strict base advocates, others are block training, others are continuous yearly progress and maintenance of intensity. It depends who you listen to and what you believe.

    Sorry it's not a pat answer.

    Maybe if you specified what your goals were and what discipline, you might get more specific answers.

    Steve
     
  3. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    for the vast majority of riders i don't believe there's much point in taking out all the intensity during the winter months. most people are time limited, and also reach their boredom threshold much quicker on an indoor trainer -- this tends to mean that most people do only shortish workouts mid week in the winter. if your training volume is vastly reduced because of this and you remove most or all of your intensity then basically you'll just detrain.

    as to what moderate or high intensity work you may need to do, will be dependent upon your fitness, goals, and training time availability.

    ric
     
  4. Robert West

    Robert West New Member

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    Ok so I should keep some of the intensity aka intervals. Now from reading this forum for a while I figure I can remove some wasted training from my schedule. The following is some of the things that I understand don't help me to get better/faster at cycling. One legged pedaling, weight lifting, low cadence work 53X12,
    I figure there's very little left, easy rides for recovery kept short/light, 1hr on the trainer or outside, sub lactate work(majority of your time is spent here this time of year) and intervals/sprints of varying lengths of time depending on what your after, the number of intervals should be increased as the season progresses. Is this it, Please feel free to correct me. Oh ya be kind!
     
  5. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    i believe it's very necessary to keep some intensity in your programme, especially if you're limited in training time, due to e.g., inclement weather. whilst one legged cycling, weights and low cadence, etc are unlikely to be beneficial per se, it's important to replace those training sessions with something else that is beneficial. for e.g., if you spent 3 hrs/week doing those sessions and just cut them out, then you'd be losing 3 hrs training per week -- you need to replace those 3 hrs. if you're limited to riding the trainer (due to e.g., bad weather) and find those one legged or low cadence or whatever sessions 'interesting' and they get you through your trainer time then you should continue to do them (or find other sessions to fill your time).

    ric "currently doing ~2hrs/day on the trainer and wants to know when the rain will stop"
     
  6. Foothills Rider

    Foothills Rider New Member

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    In Joe Friel's "Cycling Past 50", he cites a study of 15 riders during the off-season.

    I'm going to blow the specifics, but roughly:

    The first study group of 5 riders rode the same number of times/week, but with reduced intensity.
    The second study group of 5 rode fewer rides/week, with reduced intensity.
    The 3d study group of five rode fewer rides/week, but kept intensity as a part of their off-season training.

    The first 2 study groups had reduced VO2-max after their off-season, while the 3d group maintained or increased their VO2-max during the off-season...

    The implied result was that of numbers of rides, hours of riding, or intensity of rides done during the off-season, it is the latter which allows you to have seasonal recovery while still maintaining your VO2 max...
     
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