Interesting points to note about carrying flowers on a bicycle.

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Richard Bates, Jun 11, 2003.

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  1. It is not the first time I have carried flowers on my bike, but whereas I normally carry them almost
    horizontally tucked under the flap of a briefcase pannier, this time they were carried vertically,
    poking out the top of a conventional pannier.

    My observations:

    1) The fellow cyclist arriving at Tesco as I was departing, who said "Those will never last 'til you
    get home", was wrong!

    2) My statement to the effect that I always carried flowers on my bicycle in case I got run over
    caused amusement.

    3) Carrying them vertically instead of horizontally caused more cars to honk their horns as
    they overtook.

    4) Cars overtaking me gave me more room. (Possibly subconsciously linked to point 5)

    5) I realised how I was less careful in my own cycling when not carrying flowers in this position.
    It was like the cycling equivalent of having a spiked steering wheel in a car.

    love and blooming bikes from Rich x

    --
    Two fish suddenly swim into a brick wall. Damn! To reply put only the word "richard" before
    the @ sign
     
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  2. Richard Bates <[email protected]> wrote: ( It is not the first time I
    have carried flowers on my bike, but ) whereas I normally carry them almost horizontally tucked
    under the ( flap of a briefcase pannier, this time they were carried vertically, ) poking out the
    top of a conventional pannier.

    Not flowers, but rhubarb. The mutant killer rhubarb on the allotment is now getting too big to carry
    in the conventional manner (strapped, with fork, spade and hoe, along the crossbar) and too long to
    tuck under the flap of the pannier. Rather than break it in pieces I tried quite successfully at the
    weekend to carry it vertical in the pannier, sticking out of the back of the flap.

    Getting onto the bike proved to be quite a challenge, but I forgot about it and having successfully
    carried it all the way to the place it was to be transformed into crumble I snapped it in half while
    dismounting. (I was fortunate to snap only the rhubarb.)

    Isn't there a danger that vertically carried flowers might be decapitated by a dismounting leg?
     
  3. Pauline

    Pauline Guest

    "Richard Bates" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > It is not the first time I have carried flowers on my bike, but whereas I normally carry them
    > almost horizontally tucked under the flap of a briefcase pannier, this time they were carried
    > vertically, poking out the top of a conventional pannier.
    >
    > My observations:
    >
    > 4) Cars overtaking me gave me more room. (Possibly subconsciously linked to point 5)

    This happens to me to when I'm carrying leeks back from my allotment. The leek tops waving from the
    top of the pannier seem to have some 'stay clear' message even though I'm sure that my right elbow
    is sticking out further.

    > 5) I realised how I was less careful in my own cycling when not carrying flowers in this position.
    > It was like the cycling equivalent of having a spiked steering wheel in a car.
    >

    Not applicable to leeks. I think that it really is the drivers who are behaving differently. I have
    often wondered how the effect compares to having and occupied child carrier on the back.
     
  4. On Wed, 11 Jun 2003 10:26:41 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Geraint Jones) in
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Isn't there a danger that vertically carried flowers might be decapitated by a dismounting leg?

    They were in the rear end of the pannier, but I did have to bend my knee before swinging
    my leg over.

    I saw a pannier reviewed in C+ some years ago, which had a vertical cylindrical pocket at the rear.
    Designed for carrying a tent, but no doubt useful for flowers too!

    --
    Doctor Doctor I've got a strawberry stuck up my bum. Well here is some cream to put on it. To reply
    change the obvious bit to "richard"
     
  5. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    "Pauline" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > > 4) Cars overtaking me gave me more room. (Possibly subconsciously linked to point 5)

    > This happens to me to when I'm carrying leeks back from my allotment.

    I see a pattern emerging: were the flowers in the OP daffodils? Maybe a Welsh flag would work just
    as well ;-)

    --
    Guy
    ===
    I wonder if you wouldn't mind piecing out our imperfections with your thoughts; and while you're
    about it perhaps you could think when we talk of bicycles, that you see them printing their proud
    wheels i' the receiving earth; thanks awfully.
     
  6. W K

    W K Guest

    "Pauline" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Richard Bates" <[email protected]> wrote in

    > > 4) Cars overtaking me gave me more room. (Possibly subconsciously linked to point 5)
    >
    > This happens to me to when I'm carrying leeks back from my allotment. The leek tops waving from
    > the top of the pannier seem to have some 'stay
    clear'
    > message even though I'm sure that my right elbow is sticking out further.

    As we know from the car driving gurus, all drivers are just a few seconds away from falling asleep
    as the boredom of not being able to drive like fiends catches up with them.

    As such, the neurones are just tickled enough by "flowers" ... "bike" ... to make them come a little
    out of their state of torpour.
     
  7. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    Richard Bates <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > I saw a pannier reviewed in C+ some years ago, which had a vertical cylindrical pocket at the
    > rear. Designed for carrying a tent, but no doubt useful for flowers too!

    And if you have a puncture the vase of water could be very handy.

    --
    Dave...
     
  8. phil

    phil Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Geraint Jones
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Richard Bates <[email protected]> wrote: ( It is not the first time I
    >have carried flowers on my bike, but ) whereas I normally carry them almost horizontally tucked
    >under the ( flap of a briefcase pannier, this time they were carried vertically, ) poking out the
    >top of a conventional pannier.
    >
    >Not flowers, but rhubarb. The mutant killer rhubarb on the allotment is now getting too big to
    >carry in the conventional manner (strapped, with fork, spade and hoe, along the crossbar) and
    >too long to tuck under the flap of the pannier. Rather than break it in pieces I tried quite
    >successfully at the weekend to carry it vertical in the pannier, sticking out of the back of
    >the flap.

    I've successfully carried a Christmas tree home vertically in a pannier.

    Not a *very* large tree mind.

    Phil

    --
    http://www.kantaka.co.uk/ .oOo. public key: http://www.kantaka.co.uk/gpg.txt
     
  9. Paul Kelly

    Paul Kelly Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> I've successfully carried a Christmas tree home vertically in a
    > pannier.
    >
    > Not a *very* large tree mind.

    On the subject of carrying garden things on bikes - a few weeks ago in Kingston I saw an
    elderly Lady caring a garden rake on her bike...... On the rear rack, horizontally at 90
    degrees to the bike.

    pk
     
  10. Paul Kelly schrieb:

    > On the subject of carrying garden things on bikes - a few weeks ago in Kingston I saw an
    > elderly Lady caring a garden rake on her bike...... On the rear rack, horizontally at 90
    > degrees to the bike.

    Which should convince anyone in/on any other vehicle to keep a good distance when passing. Not too
    bad, that idea.

    Hans

    PS: A regular on de.rec.fahrrad has mounted a piece of massive alloy cable horizontally on the rear
    of his bike, reaching out about one meter to the left (hint: he lives near Stuttgart, Germany!).
    Looks very stable but bends away when touching any obstacle or touched by something passing too
    close without leaving scratches, so he says. For those who want to read his own description: <h-
    ttp://groups.google.com/groups?selm=b2ls2g%242bd%242%40moep.bb.bawue.de&oe=UTF-8&output=gplain>

    --
    Hans Friedlaender <http://hans.friedlaender.org> Time flies like an arrow. And fruit flies like a
    banana. Groucho Marx
     
  11. Paul Kelly

    Paul Kelly Guest

    "Hans Friedlaender" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Paul Kelly schrieb:
    >
    > > On the subject of carrying garden things on bikes - a few weeks ago in Kingston I saw an elderly
    > > Lady caring a garden rake on her bike...... On
    the
    > > rear rack, horizontally at 90 degrees to the bike.
    >
    > Which should convince anyone in/on any other vehicle to keep a good distance when passing. Not too
    > bad, that idea.

    Riding in the gutter, rake overhanging the pavement by around 2 feet (60cm) at kiddie neck height.

    Very good idea!

    pk
     
  12. Paul Kelly schrieb:

    > Riding in the gutter, rake overhanging the pavement by around 2 feet (60cm) at kiddie neck height.
    >
    > Very good idea!

    Riding in the gutter is NOT a good idea. In Germany you'll be held partially responsible for
    being hit by an opened door of a car parked along the road if you haven't kept an appropriate
    lateral distance.

    Ha'which makes many of the compulsory bike lanes unusable by definition'ns

    --
    Hans Friedlaender <http://hans.friedlaender.org> Time flies like an arrow. And fruit flies like a
    banana. Groucho Marx
     
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