Internal Gear Hub with coaster brake using rders



meb

New Member
Aug 21, 2003
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I have a couple of Nexus 4 wheelsets with coaster brakes I was planning on using this winter on commuting bikes with studded tires. Was wondering if I need remove the rder and adjust the chainlength to get the coaster brake to work or if I can simply quickly install the wheels as weather dictates?

Any other issues I may have overlooked?
 
D

dvt

Guest
meb wrote:
> I have a couple of Nexus 4 wheelsets with coaster brakes I was planning
> on using this winter on commuting bikes with studded tires. Was
> wondering if I need remove the rder and adjust the chainlength to get
> the coaster brake to work or if I can simply quickly install the wheels
> as weather dictates?


You can't run the chain through the derailer if you use a coaster brake.
You can leave the derailer on, but you'll need to adjust the chain
length and route it outside the derailer when you use the Nexus.

You need some way to adjust chain tension. Horizontal dropouts are one
solution.

What will you do with the unused Nexus shift cables when you switch back
to derailer gears? Zip tie it to the frame?

Is the Nexus hub the same width as the other hub you use on the bike?

--
Dave
dvt at psu dot edu
 

meb

New Member
Aug 21, 2003
1,219
0
36
dvt said:
meb wrote:
> I have a couple of Nexus 4 wheelsets with coaster brakes I was planning
> on using this winter on commuting bikes with studded tires. Was
> wondering if I need remove the rder and adjust the chainlength to get
> the coaster brake to work or if I can simply quickly install the wheels
> as weather dictates?


You can't run the chain through the derailer if you use a coaster brake.
You can leave the derailer on, but you'll need to adjust the chain
length and route it outside the derailer when you use the Nexus.

You need some way to adjust chain tension. Horizontal dropouts are one
solution.

What will you do with the unused Nexus shift cables when you switch back
to derailer gears? Zip tie it to the frame?

Is the Nexus hub the same width as the other hub you use on the bike?

--
Dave
dvt at psu dot edu

Could velcro it or remove it completely depending on how frequently I switch back and forth.

The 700C set is 8-12mm wider than the wheels on the candidate road bikes.
The 559 set is slightly narrower than the mountain bike tires.

Yeh-I've noticed needing to adjust the brake cable when switching between 571-25 and 559-48 tires.
 
D

dvt

Guest
meb wrote:
> dvt Wrote:
>>Is the Nexus hub the same width as the other hub you use on the bike?


> The 700C set is 8-12mm wider than the wheels on the candidate road
> bikes.
> The 559 set is slightly narrower than the mountain bike tires.
>
> Yeh-I've noticed needing to adjust the brake cable when switching
> between 571-25 and 559-48 tires.


I meant the over locknut distance (OLD) of the hub. I think you're
talking about rim/tyre width, although I can't tell for sure. It's handy
to keep the rim width the same to avoid having to adjust the brakes, but
it's not absolutely necessary.

If the OLD of the hubs are slightly different (i.e. <5 mm), you should
be able to swap them with minor inconvenience. If the OLDs are 10 mm
different, you'll probably have a tough time swapping the wheels in and
out. In either case, I'd only use different width hubs with a sturdy
bike, not a lightweight racing bike.

--
Dave
dvt at psu dot edu
 

meb

New Member
Aug 21, 2003
1,219
0
36
dvt said:
meb wrote:
> dvt Wrote:
>>Is the Nexus hub the same width as the other hub you use on the bike?


> The 700C set is 8-12mm wider than the wheels on the candidate road
> bikes.
> The 559 set is slightly narrower than the mountain bike tires.
>
> Yeh-I've noticed needing to adjust the brake cable when switching
> between 571-25 and 559-48 tires.


I meant the over locknut distance (OLD) of the hub. I think you're
talking about rim/tyre width, although I can't tell for sure. It's handy
to keep the rim width the same to avoid having to adjust the brakes, but
it's not absolutely necessary.

If the OLD of the hubs are slightly different (i.e. <5 mm), you should
be able to swap them with minor inconvenience. If the OLDs are 10 mm
different, you'll probably have a tough time swapping the wheels in and
out. In either case, I'd only use different width hubs with a sturdy
bike, not a lightweight racing bike.

--
Dave
dvt at psu dot edu

Sorry, I did respond in terms of rims rather than hubs.

The Nexus OLD differences are +10, +6, and +4 mm different.
These are steel framed bikes, at least two welded in the rear area, the third has a mix of welded and lugged connections in that area. I was considering using a Shockster which would widen the dropouts.
 
J

Jasper Janssen

Guest
On Thu, 27 Oct 2005 00:42:53 +1000, meb
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Sorry, I did respond in terms of rims rather than hubs.
>
>The Nexus OLD differences are +10, +6, and +4 mm different.
>These are steel framed bikes, at least two welded in the rear area, the
>third has a mix of welded and lugged connections in that area. I was
>considering using a Shockster which would widen the dropouts.


Remember that you cannot use the front derailer either. Also, your
chainline is almost certainly going to be far enough off that if you ride
with your regular crankset with derailer-style rings you're gonna drop the
chain.

Jasper
 
C

Chalo

Guest
Jasper Janssen wrote:
>
> Also, your
> chainline is almost certainly going to be far enough off that if you ride
> with your regular crankset with derailer-style rings you're gonna drop the
> chain.


I don't think this is the case. You can choose either ring and size
the sprocket accordingly. Then you have three lateral sprocket
positions to choose from: with an offset sprocket towards the inside or
the outside, or with a flat sprocket.

These six permutations give a lot of opportunity to get the chainline
pretty well sorted out.

Chalo Colina
 
J

Jasper Janssen

Guest
On 27 Oct 2005 00:35:59 -0700, "Chalo" <[email protected]> wrote:

>I don't think this is the case. You can choose either ring and size
>the sprocket accordingly. Then you have three lateral sprocket
>positions to choose from: with an offset sprocket towards the inside or
>the outside, or with a flat sprocket.


The sprockets available here are either offset or straight depending on
how many teeth you get, so you don't have that choice.

>These six permutations give a lot of opportunity to get the chainline
>pretty well sorted out.


You might be able to get it done. I'm not convinced it's worth the
trouble, though.

Jasper
 
W

Werehatrack

Guest
On Wed, 26 Oct 2005 16:52:10 +1000, meb
<[email protected]> wrote:

>
>I have a couple of Nexus 4 wheelsets with coaster brakes I was planning
>on using this winter on commuting bikes with studded tires. Was
>wondering if I need remove the rder and adjust the chainlength to get
>the coaster brake to work or if I can simply quickly install the wheels
>as weather dictates?
>
>Any other issues I may have overlooked?


Dropout spacing may be wrong.

Yes, remove the rder; it's incompatible with a coaster brake.

If the dropout slots have insufficient angle, you may have problems
getting the chain tension right.
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