Interval Training

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by wardie2000, Nov 28, 2003.

  1. wardie2000

    wardie2000 New Member

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    Could someone explain to me the basics of interval training? What do you do and for example what areas of cycling can it help you to better perform.

    I have got several examples of intervals from the 'net but they don't seem to make much sense!

    Also could you put an example of an interval training session explaining what to do!

    Much appreciated
     
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  2. dave602z

    dave602z New Member

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    Do you have a heart rate monitor, and do you know your max heart rate?

    Dave
     
  3. wardie2000

    wardie2000 New Member

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    I do have a HR monitor, and i do know my MHR.

    Hope this helps
     
  4. dave602z

    dave602z New Member

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    A quick and easy one to remember is: 2 minutes flat out, followed by 2 minutes easy riding.

    Interval 1

    10-20 min warm up @ less than 65% MHR
    1 min @ 85-90MHR
    1 min east riding to recover
    1 min @ 85-90MHR
    1 min easy riding
    1 min @ 85-90MHR
    5 min easy riding @ less than 72%MHR (pref 65%)
    Repeat above 2-3 times
    Warm down 20 min @ less than 72%MHR (pref 65%)
    This should take about 90 mins and is moderately hard
    Lengthen or shorten times to make it easier or harder

    Interval 2
    10-20 min warm up @ less than 65% MHR
    20 min @ 73-80% MHR
    5 min 84-90% MHR
    7 intervals hitting 90%MHR, recovering to 60-65% between efforts
    5 min 84-90% MHR
    20 min 73-80% MHR
    20 min warm down @ less than 65%

    Interval 3

    10-20 min warm up
    6-10 sprints of 15 secs each with 3 min recoveries
    10 mins easy riding
    6-8 one min sprints 80-90%MHR, recover 5 min between efforts
    10 mins easy riding
    3-4 five min intervals @ 84-90%MHR, recover for at least 6 min between efforts
    20 min warm down

    The above can be halved (not reovery times) to make it easier.

    Intervals 1 and 2 are to improve fittness, interval 3 is if you are very fit and want an extra boost.

    Mail me for any more

    Dave;)
     
  5. wardie2000

    wardie2000 New Member

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    thanks will try them soon as

    Chris
     
  6. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    Interval training is really any discontinuous training in a structured way (e.g. hill repeats), as opposed to having the session interupted (e.g. having to stop at traffic lights).

    Generally, the intervals are short periods of work (i.e., i don't think anyone would call 2 intervals of 3-hrs each an interval session), that are interspersed with periods of recovery.

    As you increase the (relative to you) intensity of exercise, the duration that you can maintain that intensity decreases. This can be seen by doing an all-out 30-sec sprint (which will leave you exhausted). However, that same person, (when recovered) may well be able to ride for many hours at a much lower intensity.

    Training at different intensities causes different physiologic and psychological adaptations. Generally, by training at moderate to maximal (aerobic) levels of intensity causes the biggest increase in fitness (for endurance athletes).

    However, at the upper reaches of aerobic capacity the work can only be sustained for seconds to minutes, e.g. at VO2 max. By riding at the same intensity, but for shorter times that you could complete maximally and repeating the session several plus times with a recovery period you have created an "interval" session.

    The intensity of the exercise, the duration of the interval, the recovery period, and the volume of intervals will all have a profound effect on the (physiological) adaptations that take place.

    For example, it may be that you want to increase your ability to climb short (60 - 300 second) hills in road races. This type of effort is often approached at VO2 max. Maximally, you maybe able to sustain this effort for six minutes. You could therefore develop an interval session of (e.g.) 90 - 100 % VO2 max for 3-minutes, which could be repeated four times (4 x 3-mins @ ~VO2 max), with 5-mins easy between each effort. Thus, with such a session you've actually ridden for double the duration you could do maximally, and probably at a slightly more comfortable level, helping to increase your VO2 max.

    The goals that you have for your cycling will define what sort of intervals you do, and the intensity, and durations, etc. of these intervals, as well as the frequency that you complete these sessions.

    Common intervals are:
    1 - 3 x 15 - 30 mins @ TT power
    3 - 8 x 4-mins @ maximal aerobic power
    10 x 10-secs @ peak sprint power

    Ric
     
  7. flysolo1

    flysolo1 New Member

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    what gearing do you use for these interval
     
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