interval training

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Br, Feb 25, 2003.

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  1. Br

    Br Guest

    Probably a question that is easy to answer but ...

    I'm planning on starting interval training and wondering how people keep track of their intervals
    ... which interval they are on, how much time left, how much time on the recovery/rest portion, etc.
    I have a Polar S710 which allows for interval training but is limited in that it does not permit
    intervals for fidderent lengths (i.e. some 60s intervals and some 90s intervals). I wish to do these
    types of intervals but imagine that if I did, I'd get lost in where I was in the training session.
    Any advice is appreciated.

    Brian
     
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  2. Jtn

    Jtn Guest

    "BR" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Probably a question that is easy to answer but ...
    >
    I wish to do these types of intervals but imagine that if I
    > did, I'd get lost in where I was in the training session. Any advice is appreciated.
    >
    > Brian
    >

    huh? dont try to make a new space shuttle. just create some repetitive type intervals and do them.
    if you cant complete them they were too hard, if you can then slowly raise the bar...... keep it
    simple, all this rocket science training stuff is over rated.....
     
  3. Warren

    Warren Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, BR <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Probably a question that is easy to answer but ...
    >
    > I'm planning on starting interval training and wondering how people keep track of their intervals
    > ... which interval they are on, how much time left, how much time on the recovery/rest portion,
    > etc. I have a Polar S710 which allows for interval training but is limited in that it does not
    > permit intervals for fidderent lengths (i.e. some 60s intervals and some 90s intervals). I wish to
    > do these types of intervals but imagine that if I did, I'd get lost in where I was in the training
    > session. Any advice is appreciated.

    Don't let the watch control you. Get the laptime and speed to the display, when you start your work
    interval hit the red button, it will beep while you start the work interval and the lap time will
    display starting from zero, when the lap timer shows the end of your work interval press the red
    button again, when the lap timer shows the end of your rest interval press the red button again.
    Repeat as needed. Your graph will show the totals and averages during each interval.

    As for what type of interval you do, there are many, and the correct choices depend on what stage of
    your training you're in and what your goals are. There is alot of information about this included in
    your S710 software.

    -WG
     
  4. warren <[email protected]> wrote:
    : Don't let the watch control you. Get the laptime and speed to the display, when you start your
    : work interval hit the red button, it will

    Sounds quite handy :) So there is a real use for the lap times, while the actual interval function
    remains useless (?).

    : As for what type of interval you do, there are many, and the correct choices depend on what stage
    : of your training you're in and what your goals are. There is alot of information about this
    : included in your S710 software.

    My understanding is you start off with low-intensity intervals. It's a kind of pyramid, as you
    could view it. (Especially if you are more endurance oriented :). Off the top of my head, how
    about a training session with 4 x 5 minute intervals, just above the lactase threshold? When you
    are good enough with the lower level, you move up to next level of intensity, while decreasing
    interval lenght.

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  5. Warren

    Warren Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > warren <[email protected]> wrote:
    > : Don't let the watch control you. Get the laptime and speed to the display, when you start your
    > : work interval hit the red button, it will
    >
    > Sounds quite handy :) So there is a real use for the lap times, while the actual interval function
    > remains useless (?).
    >
    > : As for what type of interval you do, there are many, and the correct choices depend on what
    > : stage of your training you're in and what your goals are. There is alot of information about
    > : this included in your S710 software.
    >
    > My understanding is you start off with low-intensity intervals. It's a kind of pyramid, as you
    > could view it. (Especially if you are more endurance oriented :). Off the top of my head, how
    > about a training session with 4 x 5 minute intervals, just above the lactase threshold? When you
    > are good enough with the lower level, you move up to next level of intensity, while decreasing
    > interval lenght.

    Normally you'll start off just BELOW LT, then build up to either longer work intervals and/or doing
    the interval slightly above LT. I start off with 5 minute work/rest times 5, then shorten the rest
    to 4 minutes, then go slightly above LT. Takes me about 5 weeks. Then I start doing 1 minute
    intervals way over LT times 4-5 with 5 minutes rest interval. Depends on the goals.

    -WG
     
  6. Fstrnu

    Fstrnu Guest

    For endurance, start with 4 x 5 min intervals around LT (stay within LT +/- 5bpm). Recover between
    sets until your heart rate drops to around 40% LT. As you gain fitness, you will recover faster and
    will naturally be able to do more or longer reps within the alloted time.

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > warren <[email protected]> wrote:
    > : Don't let the watch control you. Get the laptime and speed to the display, when you start your
    > : work interval hit the red button, it will
    >
    > Sounds quite handy :) So there is a real use for the lap times, while the actual interval function
    > remains useless (?).
    >
    > : As for what type of interval you do, there are many, and the correct choices depend on what
    > : stage of your training you're in and what your goals are. There is alot of information about
    > : this included in your S710 software.
    >
    > My understanding is you start off with low-intensity intervals. It's a kind of pyramid, as you
    > could view it. (Especially if you are more endurance oriented :). Off the top of my head, how
    > about a training session with 4 x 5 minute intervals, just above the lactase threshold? When you
    > are good enough with the lower level, you move up to next level of intensity, while decreasing
    > interval lenght.
    >
    > --
    > Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  7. warren <[email protected]> wrote:
    :> My understanding is you start off with low-intensity intervals. It's a kind of pyramid, as you
    :> could view it. (Especially if you are more endurance oriented :). Off the top of my head, how
    :> about a training session with 4 x 5 minute intervals, just above the lactase threshold? When you
    :> are good enough with the lower level, you move up to next level of intensity, while decreasing
    :> interval lenght.

    : Normally you'll start off just BELOW LT, then build up to either longer work intervals and/or
    : doing the interval slightly above LT.

    Ok, it depends a lot on your fitness, previous training, training philosophy, feelings etc :) Took a
    look at my old notes (http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/hpv/train_types.html) and they say interval
    training could begin with 2 * 15 minutes in the tempo zone (85-90 % of LTHR). Maybe several
    intervals over LT is a bit too much :-. Then again fit cyclists should be able to ride 30 min
    continuously at LTHR? LT is called also the steady state, remember? ;)

    Of course you need a base with lots of continuous (and possibly interval, if you feel like it)
    training below your LT - essentially, in all the zones below your LT - before it makes sense to
    start serious anaerobic training.

    : I start off with 5 minute work/rest times 5, then shorten the rest to 4 minutes, then go slightly
    : above LT. Takes me about 5 weeks. Then I start doing 1 minute intervals way over LT times 4-5 with
    : 5 minutes rest interval. Depends on the goals.

    So your interval training is only about 2 months? The transition from 5 min to 1 min intervals
    sounds a bit abrupt, too =)

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  8. Raptor

    Raptor Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > warren <[email protected]> wrote:
    > :> My understanding is you start off with low-intensity intervals. It's a kind of pyramid, as you
    > :> could view it. (Especially if you are more endurance oriented :). Off the top of my head, how
    > :> about a training session with 4 x 5 minute intervals, just above the lactase threshold? When
    > :> you are good enough with the lower level, you move up to next level of intensity, while
    > :> decreasing interval lenght.
    >
    > : Normally you'll start off just BELOW LT, then build up to either longer work intervals and/or
    > : doing the interval slightly above LT.
    >
    > Ok, it depends a lot on your fitness, previous training, training philosophy, feelings etc :) Took
    > a look at my old notes (http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/hpv/train_types.html) and they say
    > interval training could begin with 2 * 15 minutes in the tempo zone (85-90 % of LTHR). Maybe
    > several intervals over LT is a bit too much :-. Then again fit cyclists should be able to ride 30
    > min continuously at LTHR? LT is called also the steady state, remember? ;)
    >
    > Of course you need a base with lots of continuous (and possibly interval, if you feel like it)
    > training below your LT - essentially, in all the zones below your LT - before it makes sense to
    > start serious anaerobic training.

    I'm missing something. Isn't LTHR the hardest level that a person can maintain "indefinitely?" Why
    train intervals at <LTHR? Why can't any couch potato work at just below their LTHR as long as their
    aerobic supply lasts?

    --
    --
    Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall "I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we
    could to protect our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security." --Microsoft VP in
    charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.
     
  9. Warren

    Warren Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, The Pomeranian
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > BR wrote:
    > >
    > > Probably a question that is easy to answer but ...
    > >
    > > I'm planning on starting interval training and wondering how people keep track of their
    > > intervals ...
    >
    > Here's how I do it:
    >
    > I do training rides with people who are more talented than me and are willing to torture me. I
    > keep track of my intervals by how far down my tongue is hanging.

    Too much technical jargon for me to understand...

    -WG
     
  10. BR wrote:
    >
    > Probably a question that is easy to answer but ...
    >
    > I'm planning on starting interval training and wondering how people keep track of their
    > intervals ...

    Here's how I do it:

    I do training rides with people who are more talented than me and are willing to torture me. I keep
    track of my intervals by how far down my tongue is hanging. It seems to be an effective no fuss no
    muss method for low rank amateurs like me, and it is fun to boot (I got in the best shape of my life
    that way). After all, I don't get paid to be scientific, systematic, and methodical when it comes to
    training for bike racing. I get enough of that (scientific, systematic, and methodical) shit at work
    everyday. That said, stupid actions in an actual bike race get stupid results. I've proven that
    scientifically.
     
  11. Warren

    Warren Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > warren <[email protected]> wrote:

    > : I start off with 5 minute work/rest times 5, then shorten the rest to 4 minutes, then go
    > : slightly above LT. Takes me about 5 weeks. Then I start doing 1 minute intervals way over LT
    > : times 4-5 with 5 minutes rest interval. Depends on the goals.
    >
    > So your interval training is only about 2 months? The transition from 5 min to 1 min intervals
    > sounds a bit abrupt, too =)

    I don't start the LT intervals until after 8-12 weeks of base miles. I do about 5 weeks of the LT
    intervals before beginning the one minute intervals and I keep doing the LT intervals any week I
    don't race. I am adding the one minute intervals to my training, not replacing the 5 minute
    intervals.

    -WG
     
  12. Raptor <[email protected]> wrote:
    :> Of course you need a base with lots of continuous (and possibly interval, if you feel like it)
    :> training below your LT - essentially, in all the zones below your LT - before it makes sense to
    :> start serious anaerobic training.

    : I'm missing something. Isn't LTHR the hardest level that a person can maintain "indefinitely?" Why
    : train intervals at <LTHR? Why can't any couch potato work at just below their LTHR as long as
    : their aerobic supply lasts?

    Well, LT is a level you can maintain... I'm not the best person to answer, consult exercise
    physiology books. I'd think aerobic endurance figures in too, a couch potato wouldn't last long
    because of untrained aerobic capacity.

    You can also think of it this way: energy is always produced aerobically and anaerobically. Though
    it is a lot more complicated than that, there are different energy systems, and dunno what else goes
    into performance and endurance physiology. As you increase your pace from an easy aerobic one, your
    body increases production of lactic acid and utilization of anaerobic mechanisms. Concentration of
    lactic acid increases, as your body can't utilize all of it, and there are some counterproductive
    byproducts. Roughly, these metabolic products increase exponentially, and eventually you reach a
    limit where your body can't scale up to more strenous pace anymore.

    When you look at this process, it's rather gradual, and there is no clear breakpoint where you can
    point at. LT is a conceptual abstraction, which helps to make sense of your training :)

    For more info on energy systems, take a look at http://www.brianmac.demon.co.uk/energy.htm

    To return to the original topic, you have to train the less effective, more efficient, more aerobic
    energy and metabolic systems first, as after that anaerobic training can be more effective.

    --
    Risto Varanka | http://www.helsinki.fi/~rvaranka/ varis at no spam please iki fi
     
  13. Warren

    Warren Guest

  14. That's a great site. One thing I learned from it (and others) is that sometimes the best way to
    train a particular heart-rate zone is NOT to train in that zone, but maybe just below it. It's
    counter-intuitive, but going balls-out is not necessarily the best way to train for going balls-out.

    I know it from my own experience, and from talking with others, but a big problem with interval
    training is that sometimes you have to force yourself to back off the intensity. Too many years of
    'no pain, no gain' as a weightlifter make it darned hard to break old habits.

    warren <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<270220031818144706%[email protected]>...
    > Here is a link to what I think is probably the best site I've found about exercise physiology and
    > training that is explained in layman's terms.
    >
    > http://home.hia.no/~stephens/exphys.htm
    >
    >
    > -WG
     
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