Interview with George Hincapie about High Road



cyclingheroes

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There are some exceptions. Fignon in the past and nowadays Jaksche and Nuyens.

I just did an interview with Nuyens (no its not published yet), he has a university degree in communication science (is it called like that in English?, in Dutch its commincatiewetenschappen in German Kommunikationswissenschaften). Nick is a pretty smart guy.


limerickman said:
I agree.

No disrespect intended .........I don't expect to read anything particularly insightful from any rider.

I'll try to put this as diplomatically as possible - none of these guys are particularly well educated/read.
I'm not saying that they're not intelligent.

Which begs the question - which rider gives the most insightful/intelligent interviews?
One recent interview I read with Erik Dekker was superb - it was full of good observations about training, his rivals and life after cycling.
 

snood

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cyclingheroes said:
There are some exceptions. Fignon in the past and nowadays Jaksche and Nuyens.

I just did an interview with Nuyens (no its not published yet), he has a university degree in communication science (is it called like that in English?, in Dutch its commincatiewetenschappen in German Kommunikationswissenschaften). Nick is a pretty smart guy.
Pinotti is engineer.
 

nns1400

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cyclingheroes said:
I just did an interview with Nuyens (no its not published yet), he has a university degree in communication science (is it called like that in English?, in Dutch its commincatiewetenschappen in German Kommunikationswissenschaften). Nick is a pretty smart guy.
We try to make things shorter and snappier in English...just Communications is fine. Or even just PR...which stands for public relations.

The Dutch and German words just sound like supercalifragilisticexpialadocious to me....(from Mary Poppins to the uninitiated)
 

JohnO

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I'm impressed that you could spell it...

nns1400 said:
We try to make things shorter and snappier in English...just Communications is fine. Or even just PR...which stands for public relations.

The Dutch and German words just sound like supercalifragilisticexpialadocious to me....(from Mary Poppins to the uninitiated)
 

Crankyfeet

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nns1400 said:
...Dutch and German words just sound like supercalifragilisticexpialadocious to me...
If you're going to make a point of criticizing other languages...at least get the spelling of ours right...

supercalifragilisticexpialidocious


Geez...:rolleyes: :D
 

nns1400

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Crankyfeet said:
nns1400 said:
...Dutch and German words just sound like supercalifragilisticexpialadocious to me...QUOTE]

If you're going to make a point criticizing other languages...at least get the spelling of ours right...

supercalifragilisticexpialidocious


Geez...:rolleyes: :D
you know, I had a moment's hesitation over the i or the a...but I knew you would be on hand to correct me :rolleyes: :p .
 

thoughtforfood

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earth_dweller said:
George Hincapie is dumb. period. yes I have met him multiple times. It has nothing to do with blurting out things in a derogatory manner during interview, but in actually being able to answer questions intelligently while providing some information.

This comment is not a reflection of the nice work by CH by any means.
I have met him more than once too, and he is a nice guy.
 

thoughtforfood

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limerickman said:
I agree.

No disrespect intended .........I don't expect to read anything particularly insightful from any rider.

I'll try to put this as diplomatically as possible - none of these guys are particularly well educated/read.
I'm not saying that they're not intelligent.

Which begs the question - which rider gives the most insightful/intelligent interviews?
One recent interview I read with Erik Dekker was superb - it was full of good observations about training, his rivals and life after cycling.
Dave Z is frickin hilarious.
 

cyclingheroes

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Crankyfeet said:
nns1400 said:
...Dutch and German words just sound like supercalifragilisticexpialadocious to me...QUOTE]

If you're going to make a point of criticizing other languages...at least get the spelling of ours right...

supercalifragilisticexpialidocious


Geez...:rolleyes: :D
Just saw your new avatar, are you never getting tired and more important... who is your doctor? He must be pretty good, you just never stop riding..:D
 

Crankyfeet

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cyclingheroes said:
Just saw your new avatar, are you never getting tired and more important... who is your doctor? He must be pretty good, you just never stop riding..:D
I have discovered a new way to ride 10% better than any other cyclist, doped or not, and am currently trying to sell the concept to Carmichael and Bruyneel.

The key is that I never sit down when I ride. I train 400 miles a week totally out of the saddle. At first it was difficult to stay out for longer than 30 seconds. But now I can go 200 miles plus without sitting down.

I use a spike instead of a saddle as a training aid. It works well.:D
 

Crankyfeet

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thoughtforfood said:
Dave Z is frickin hilarious.
Dave Z comes across to me as a bit of an attention seeking sap. I can see this trait clearly cause I are one.:D
 

nns1400

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Crankyfeet said:
Dave Z comes across to me as a bit of an attention seeking sap. I can see this trait clearly cause I are one.:D
The last interview I saw with him vaguely reminded me of Jeff Spicoli...
 

Crankyfeet

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Felt_Rider said:
.........and I think that is generally true for most athletes in all the major mainstream sports. Some are even smooth enough (personable) to give a good interview, but still are not the brightest. You would think that most of them would make good coaches, but I have met many (not in cycling) that are at the top of their game and yet know very little about how to train themselves, much less, someone else. They have/had the best genetics for that given event and by that and some hard effort excelled when others in the trenches try much harder. Even after many years of training they still depend on coaches/trainers/doctors to spell it out what they need to do and when they need to do it. There are many on this website that are much better educated in physiology and training than professionals. I know education is a broad spectrum, but I am picking on the professionals in an area where they make a living and yet know very little about what makes them function and excel at what they do.
Do you think part of that though is because of the pro's implicit "I don't need to know what you're doing" nature of team doctor administered medication?

I was really interested in reading Jaksche's translated interview from Der Spiegel where he gave the impression he didn't want to know too much about the team vitamins etc. and that for him, half the excitement of changing teams seemed to be in finding out whether the new team's doctors could drastically change his performance. And Jorg sounded particularly intelligent. It seemed that everyone did not want to get too deep into knowledge of the "stuff" and what it physiologically was meant to do. If they (the doctors and managers) were too descriptive, they could have been subpoened later and had to explain away what they had said. Even the DS's rarely talked in direct language even though the whole team knew what they were talking about.

But I agree with you in terms of ourselves hypothetically being in that position. When you are playing around with drugs and transfusions that could kill you if they're not administered correctly, it would be reassuring to have some knowledge of what was going on.
 

cyclingheroes

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Crankyfeet said:
I have discovered a new way to ride 10% better than any other cyclist, doped or not, and am currently trying to sell the concept to Carmichael and Bruyneel.

The key is that I never sit down when I ride. I train 400 miles a week totally out of the saddle. At first it was difficult to stay out for longer than 30 seconds. But now I can go 200 miles plus without sitting down.

I use a spike instead of a saddle as a training aid. It works well.:D
Is the spike out of carbon? :D
 

thoughtforfood

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nns1400 said:
The last interview I saw with him vaguely reminded me of Jeff Spicoli...
Is that a bad thing? "What Jefferson was saying was, Hey! You know, we left this England place 'cause it was bogus; so if we don't get some cool rules ourselves - pronto - we'll just be bogus too! Get it?" Jeff Spicoli
 

nns1400

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thoughtforfood said:
Is that a bad thing? "What Jefferson was saying was, Hey! You know, we left this England place 'cause it was bogus; so if we don't get some cool rules ourselves - pronto - we'll just be bogus too! Get it?" Jeff Spicoli
I think you've got it, Mr. Spicoli! Mr. Hand

(Fave line from the whole movie, BTW...:) )
 

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