Intro and buying advice for a casual cyclist

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by Tetsu, Sep 17, 2018.

  1. Tetsu

    Tetsu New Member

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    Hello there,

    I'm new here and looking for buying advice.

    I'm a casual cyclist, cycling for 2-3 times a week, mostly getting myself a bit of cardio and R&R in the process.
    My old trustworthy Scott broke down, so here I am.

    Looked a bit for a simple bicycle, and narrowed it down to two choices:

    https://goo.gl/uh597F
    OR
    https://goo.gl/G26eTM

    I'm looking for as good as possible simple, sturdy and comfortable bicycle for my casual needs.
    Don't need anything fancy (I think these variants from which I choose is somewhat entry type), though I'll be going through different terrains - road and off-road(some gravel, but nothing too rough).

    Could you pinpoint me from the bikes I've chosen, which would be better for my needs?
    I'm a total newbie, I just did a bit of research of technology both bikes are using, Radial seems to have upper hand, but I might be wrong.

    Please help me out!

    Thanks!
     
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  2. Yojimbo_

    Yojimbo_ Well-Known Member

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    I have come to the conclusion after many years of very deep thinking that all bikes at the same price point are equally good.

    I've also learned that there's really no point in asking others for their opinion because everyone has a different one.

    Jus get the bike that you feel good about...and don't worry about small differences in price. If you aren't happy with it you won't use it.

    And get some good shorts, a good helmet and a bike computer.

    Happy cycling.
     
  3. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    Get fitted for an entry level road race bike if you can afford it. It's a much nicer experience.
     
  4. Michael C. Franklin

    Michael C. Franklin New Member

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  5. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    If you are going to spend less than $800 for a MTB or hybrid you need to stay away from a bike that has any sort of suspension like those shock forks, they don't work like you think they should. Cheap shock forks are highly problematic, they won't last, they're not designed for rough off road use, they're heavy...very heavy, they cost more money to put on a bike so they have to cheapen the components or/and the frame to fit the price point and profit point; when it breaks it will cost you more to replace the shock fork than the bike is worth. Shock forks are only necessary if you'll be doing fast downhill technical racing which in that case the cheaper shock forks will fail you, but you wouldn't be buying a $400 bike to race on anyways.

    I suggest you find a MTB or hybrid with a rigid fork.
     
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