Introduction to Thai Food

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by CurrySimple, Mar 25, 2006.

  1. CurrySimple

    CurrySimple Guest

    Give Thai a Try!

    Think of the worst food you've ever tasted. Soggy, boiled
    vegetables springs to mind-the kind with all the taste and nutrition
    leached out of them. No spice or texture, no freshness or goodness.
    Now think of the opposite, and you have heavenly Thai food. Fresh,
    spicy, salty, sweet and sour, with a variety of textures and
    temperatures (crispy and soft, hot and cold), Thai food is a taste
    explosion in every bite. Once you've tried it, you'll never go
    back to plain old meat-and-potatoes cooking again.

    Another way to describe Thai food? Imagine Chinese food, but with
    more intensity. With more flavors, more aroma, spices, and textures.
    If you like Chinese food, you're going to fall
    head-over-heels-in-love with Thai food!

    Thai Curry

    The roots of Thai cuisine can be found both in regional tastes and
    flavors as well as in the influence of cooking styles from nearby
    cultures. Despite the fact that Thailand is at least partially
    separated from its neighbors by water, it has never isolated itself
    from other nations. Indian and Malaysian spices and dishes (such as
    curries) were brought with travel and trade, and the Thais were quick
    to add these wonderful flavors to their own unique version of curry.
    Today there are four main curries in Thai cuisine: green, red, yellow,
    and Massaman.

    Thai curry dishes start with a very intense and fragrant curry
    paste or sauce, usually made by hand with pestle & mortar. Once the
    paste/sauce is made, Thai curry is extremely easy to create, simply by
    adding any variety of meat, seafood, vegetables, or tofu and cooking it
    in the oven (like a casserole).

    Thai Noodles

    Thailand is also famous for its fragrant stir-fried noodle
    dishes. Most Thai noodle recipes call for rice noodles rather than
    those made with wheat or egg, although these can also be found in Thai
    cooking. Noodles were first brought to Thailand by the Chinese, many
    of whom remained in Thailand and integrated with the local society.
    For this reason, Chinese cooking has been a major influence in Thai
    cuisine, including cooking styles (the Chinese introduced the wok) and
    key cooking ingredients, such as soy sauce.

    Thai Stir-fries

    From stir-fried local vegetables to dishes that combine meat,
    vegetables, tofu, or noodles, stir-fries are a common part of everyday
    Thai cooking. When creating stir-fry sauces, Thai chefs seek a balance
    of flavors-spicy, salty, sour, and sweet-by using ingredients like
    fish sauce, soy sauce, lime juice, lemongrass, fresh chilli (or chilli
    sauce), and a little sugar. Achieving this balance is not difficult,
    but it does take practice.

    With a little help from CurrySimple Thai food products, cooking
    Thai food at home can be easy and just as delicious as the restaurant
    version. So forget those old boiled vegetables. Create some heavenly
    Thai food in your kitchen today, and add a little freshness and spice
    to your life!

    http://www.CurrySimple.com
     
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  2. Ward Abbott

    Ward Abbott Guest

    On 25 Mar 2006 10:32:14 -0800, "CurrySimple" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Think of the worst food you've ever tasted. Soggy, boiled
    >vegetables springs to mind-the kind with all the taste and nutrition
    >leached out of them. No spice or texture, no freshness or goodness.


    <vbg> and we can thank our friends across the pond in Merry Ole
    England for that cuisine.
     
  3. JohnHancock

    JohnHancock Guest

    CurrySimple wrote:
    [Snipped a load of posted BS]



    > http://www.CurrySimple.com


    Now we get to point - hello Mr/Mrs/sub-human spammer! Take your SPAM,
    and shove it up your arse! I bet you are used to having objects inserted
    into that orifice!

    jh
     
  4. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    CurrySimple wrote:
    > Give Thai a Try!
    >
    > Think of the worst food you've ever tasted.


    Guess you never lived in Thailand, eh? Some of the worst smelling, worst
    tasting food I've ever had. Of course there was great Thai food... but they
    were busy cooking it, not selling SPAM.

    Jill
     
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