Iodized Salt

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Richard Gams, Feb 6, 2004.

  1. Richard Gams

    Richard Gams Guest

    The good cooks all seem to claim that regular table salt is terrible, and they use kosher salt (or
    sea salt) for cooking and sea salt for finishing. These salts are rarely available in iodized form.

    So if we use kosher and sea salts exclusively, will we develop thyroid problems from lack of iodine?

    Richard
     
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  2. Vox Humana

    Vox Humana Guest

    "richard gams" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > The good cooks all seem to claim that regular table salt is terrible, and they use kosher salt
    > (or sea salt) for cooking and sea salt for finishing. These salts are rarely available in
    > iodized form.
    >
    > So if we use kosher and sea salts exclusively, will we develop thyroid problems from lack
    > of iodine?
    >

    No. If you eat a balanced diet, you will get enough Iodine.
     
  3. Hahabogus

    Hahabogus Guest

    [email protected] (richard gams) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > The good cooks all seem to claim that regular table salt is terrible, and they use kosher salt
    > (or sea salt) for cooking and sea salt for finishing. These salts are rarely available in
    > iodized form.
    >
    > So if we use kosher and sea salts exclusively, will we develop thyroid problems from lack
    > of iodine?
    >
    > Richard
    >

    So use table salt at the table and kosher or sea salt while cooking.

    --
    Once during Prohibition I was forced to live for days on nothing but food and water.
    --------
    FIELDS, W. C.
     
  4. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    richard gams wrote:
    > The good cooks all seem to claim that regular table salt is terrible, and they use kosher salt
    > (or sea salt) for cooking and sea salt for finishing. These salts are rarely available in
    > iodized form.
    >
    > So if we use kosher and sea salts exclusively, will we develop thyroid problems from lack
    > of iodine?
    >
    > Richard

    I've got a box of "iodized" sea salt.

    Jill
     
  5. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "richard gams" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > The good cooks all seem to claim that regular table salt is terrible, and they use kosher salt
    > (or sea salt) for cooking and sea salt for finishing. These salts are rarely available in
    > iodized form.
    >
    > So if we use kosher and sea salts exclusively, will we develop thyroid problems from lack
    > of iodine?
    >
    > Richard

    No - eat your greens...

    From http://www.poundshed.com/hs/milkthistle.htm

    Foods, rich in iodine are asparagus, dulse, garlic, saltwater fish, sea salt, iodized salt like
    everyday table salt, lima beans, soybeans, Swiss chard, summer squash, mushrooms, spinach, turnip
    greens, and kelp! You can get too much iodine and some symptoms of that may include a metallic
    taste in your mouth , sores in your mouth, swollen salivary glands, diarrhea, and or vomiting. In
    this case foods that help to inhibit the absorption of iodine include turnips, cabbage, brussel
    sprouts, cauliflower, kale, peaches and pears. So, in either case you have a natural way to get
    iodine when you need it and inhibit it when you don't. Just make sure you're in balance with this
    essential mineral!

    Dimitri
     
  6. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    > ragams
    >
    >The good cooks all seem to claim that regular table salt is terrible, and they use kosher salt (or
    >sea salt) for cooking and sea salt for finishing. These salts are rarely available in iodized form.

    >So if we use kosher and sea salts exclusively, will we develop thyroid problems from lack
    >of iodine?

    Methinks you need to concern yourself more about increasing your IQ.

    http://www.saltinstitute.org/iodine-seasalt.html

    Iodine in non-iodized sea salt Dietary salt is the consensus means of increasing iodine intakes in
    populations to combat Iodine Deficiency Disorders. There is little iodine in natural sea salt.

    Two studies examine this question:

    Fisher and L'Abbe (1980) tested non-iodized sea salt and iodized table salt and sea salt. The
    authors found 52.9 - 84.6 micrograms iodine/gram of salt in iodized salt and 1.2 - 1.4 micrograms
    iodine/gram in non-iodized sea salt. [see Fisher, Peter W. F. and Mary L'Abbe. 1980. Iodine in
    Iodized Table Salt and in Sea Salt. Can. Inst. Food Sci. Technolo. J. Vol. 13. No. 2:103-104. April]

    Aquaron (2000) determined iodine content of natural sea salt and rock salt, and iodized salt. The
    author found iodine levels of less than 0.71 milligrams iodine/kilogram of salt (micrograms/gram) in
    non-iodized salt and 7.65 - 100 mg iodine/kg of salt in iodized salt (depending on the country's
    iodine laws). [see Aquaron, R. 2000. Iodine content of non iodized salts and iodized salts obtained
    from the retail markets worldwide. 8th World Salt Symposium. Vol.
    2:935-940]
    ---

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon
    ```````````` "Life would be devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  7. Zxcvbob

    Zxcvbob Guest

    richard gams wrote:
    > The good cooks all seem to claim that regular table salt is terrible, and they use kosher salt
    > (or sea salt) for cooking and sea salt for finishing. These salts are rarely available in
    > iodized form.
    >
    > So if we use kosher and sea salts exclusively, will we develop thyroid problems from lack
    > of iodine?
    >
    > Richard

    It depends on how much natural iodine is in your diet. If you eat a lot of seafood, you're OK. If
    you live inland and the soil doesn't contain iodine and you don't eat ocean fish, then you are at
    risk unless you take some kind of iodine supplement.

    Bob
     
  8. "richard gams" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > The good cooks all seem to claim that regular table salt is terrible, and they use kosher salt
    > (or sea salt) for cooking and sea salt for finishing. These salts are rarely available in
    > iodized form.
    >
    > So if we use kosher and sea salts exclusively, will we develop thyroid problems from lack
    > of iodine?

    Not with a proper diet, and if you are really concerned have some shrimp, excellenct source
    of iodine.

    Jessica
    >
    > Richard
     
  9. Vox Humana

    Vox Humana Guest

    "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > richard gams wrote:
    > > The good cooks all seem to claim that regular table salt is terrible, and they use kosher salt
    > > (or sea salt) for cooking and sea salt for finishing. These salts are rarely available in
    > > iodized form.
    > >
    > > So if we use kosher and sea salts exclusively, will we develop thyroid problems from lack of
    > > iodine?
    > >
    > > Richard
    >
    >
    > It depends on how much natural iodine is in your diet. If you eat a lot of seafood, you're OK. If
    > you live inland and the soil doesn't contain iodine and you don't eat ocean fish, then you are at
    > risk unless you take some kind of iodine supplement.
    >

    That only makes sense if you live in an iodine deficient area and only eat local produce. Most of us
    eat meat, dairy, eggs, and produce that is shipped in from the four corners of the earth.
     
  10. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On 6 Feb 2004 07:28:33 -0800, [email protected] (richard gams) wrote:

    >The good cooks all seem to claim that regular table salt is terrible, and they use kosher salt (or
    >sea salt) for cooking and sea salt for finishing.

    Buzzz. Many "good cooks" prefer larger-grained salt for ease of handling. Comparitive taste
    tests of all kinds of salt reveal few significant differences in the taste of sodium chloride,
    however marketed.

    >So if we use kosher and sea salts exclusively, will we develop thyroid problems from lack
    >of iodine?

    Goiter and cretinism are thyroid disorders caused by a lack of iodine in the diet. Iodine is
    deficient in some (usually far from coastal) soils, hence the promotion (and legislation, in some
    cases) of iodized salt as a method to prevent this deficiency. Now that our food comes from many
    sources, it is unlikely that many would develop these conditions simply by using uniodized salt. I
    believe the necessary quantity is quite tiny. Fish and shellfish are good sources, as are vegetables
    from soil not deficient in the element. The classic "varied diet" will generally provide enough
    iodine for good health.
     
  11. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    richard gams wrote:

    > The good cooks all seem to claim that regular table salt is terrible, and they use kosher salt
    > (or sea salt) for cooking and sea salt for finishing. These salts are rarely available in
    > iodized form.
    >
    > So if we use kosher and sea salts exclusively, will we develop thyroid problems from lack
    > of iodine?

    Possibly. My sister in law was a health food fanatic back in the 60's and 70's and used only sea
    salt because she did not want to add salt with poison (iodine) to her family. She switched back to
    iodized salt after my niece developed a goitre.

    I have switched to sea salt and kosher salt because I think it is better. There may not be much
    iodine in it, but it can be tasted. I can always do like my grandfather used to do, a drop of iodine
    every morning.
     
  12. "Vox Humana" <[email protected]> wrote in news:evOUb.1826$se2.731
    @fe2.columbus.rr.com:

    >
    > "richard gams" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> The good cooks all seem to claim that regular table salt is terrible, and they use kosher salt
    >> (or sea salt) for cooking and sea salt for finishing. These salts are rarely available in
    >> iodized form.
    >>
    >> So if we use kosher and sea salts exclusively, will we develop thyroid problems from lack of
    >> iodine?
    >>
    >
    > No. If you eat a balanced diet, you will get enough Iodine.
    >
    >

    There's been some research in Australia into iodine levels, over the past few years, and the results
    have indicated widespread moderate iodine deficiency in Australia. Our soils are low in iodine.
    Iodized salt is available, but obviously not the only salt on the shelf. I believe the researchers
    think decreasing use of salt is contributing to the problem, plus only a small percentage of those
    who buy salt buying the iodized form. Here's a link to a story that appeared in The Age last year

    http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2003/02/16/1045330467606.html

    I don't know that a balanced diet will necessarily address your iodine requirements, unless you are
    able to obtain and eat a lot of seafood.

    Rhonda Anderson Cranebrook,NSW,Australia
     
  13. Puester

    Puester Guest

    richard gams wrote:
    >
    > The good cooks all seem to claim that regular table salt is terrible, and they use kosher salt
    > (or sea salt) for cooking and sea salt for finishing. These salts are rarely available in
    > iodized form.
    >
    > So if we use kosher and sea salts exclusively, will we develop thyroid problems from lack
    > of iodine?
    >
    > Richard

    Not if you eat fish and other seafood.

    gloria p
     
  14. Puester wrote:

    > Not if you eat fish and other seafood.
    >

    I'm wondering how much iodized salt is needed to avoid thyroid problems. We do eat a fairly varied
    diet with some seafood. We don't cook with salt at all. I use iodized salt at the table. My
    boyfriend never adds salt to his food. We eat out fairly often and presumably get iodized salt in
    restaurant meals. I'm thinking that should be plenty of iodine, but who knows.

    --Lia
     
  15. [email protected] (richard gams) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > The good cooks all seem to claim that regular table salt is terrible, and they use kosher salt
    > (or sea salt) for cooking and sea salt for finishing. These salts are rarely available in
    > iodized form.
    >
    > So if we use kosher and sea salts exclusively, will we develop thyroid problems from lack
    > of iodine?
    >
    > Richard

    If you eat your fair share of shrimp, it's unlikely that you'll ever be deficient in iodine. Most
    have a relatively high iodine content.

    Wayne
     
  16. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

  17. Frogleg <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Sat, 07 Feb 2004 03:56:23 GMT, Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>[email protected] (richard gams) wrote
    >
    >>> So if we use kosher and sea salts exclusively, will we develop thyroid problems from lack of
    >>> iodine?
    >
    >>If you eat your fair share of shrimp, it's unlikely that you'll ever be deficient in iodine. Most
    >>have a relatively high iodine content.
    >
    > Hmmm.
    >
    > http://www.feinberg.northwestern.edu/nutrition/factsheets/iodine.html
    >

    Hmmm... Looks like haddock is an even better choice!
     
  18. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Sat, 07 Feb 2004 14:59:19 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Frogleg <[email protected]> wrote

    >> Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    >>>If you eat your fair share of shrimp, it's unlikely that you'll ever be deficient in iodine. Most
    >>>have a relatively high iodine content.
    >>
    >> Hmmm.
    >>
    >> http://www.feinberg.northwestern.edu/nutrition/factsheets/iodine.html
    >>
    >
    >Hmmm... Looks like haddock is an even better choice!

    Hah! *Try* finding a fresh haddock in SE Virginia! No figures on spot, croaker, or bluefish. It
    appears to me as if the minimum requirement (about 150 micrograms) is well-supplied by either
    iodized salt, which is probably the ingredient in most packaged foods' sodium content (no lack of
    *that*), and our habits of demanding out-of-season foods from all corners of the globe. I think
    seaweed is a rich source and I'm now noshing on some seaweed-wrapped rice crackers. I very much
    doubt that if someone switches to un-iodized salt for cooking, they're going to suffer serious
    consequences.
     
  19. Frogleg <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Sat, 07 Feb 2004 14:59:19 GMT, Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Frogleg <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >>> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >
    >>>>If you eat your fair share of shrimp, it's unlikely that you'll ever be deficient in iodine.
    >>>>Most have a relatively high iodine content.
    >>>
    >>> Hmmm.
    >>>
    >>> http://www.feinberg.northwestern.edu/nutrition/factsheets/iodine.html
    >>>
    >>
    >>Hmmm... Looks like haddock is an even better choice!
    >
    > Hah! *Try* finding a fresh haddock in SE Virginia! No figures on spot, croaker, or bluefish. It
    > appears to me as if the minimum requirement (about 150 micrograms) is well-supplied by either
    > iodized salt, which is probably the ingredient in most packaged foods' sodium content (no lack of
    > *that*), and our habits of demanding out-of-season foods from all corners of the globe. I think
    > seaweed is a rich source and I'm now noshing on some seaweed-wrapped rice crackers. I very much
    > doubt that if someone switches to un-iodized salt for cooking, they're going to suffer serious
    > consequences.
    >
    >

    I'm sure you're right. I haven't used iodized salt for years and have suffered no consequences. Oh,
    I love those rice crackers!
     
  20. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Sat, 07 Feb 2004 16:39:17 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Frogleg <[email protected]> wrote

    >>I think seaweed is a rich source and I'm now noshing on some seaweed-wrapped rice crackers. I very
    >>much doubt that if someone switches to un-iodized salt for cooking, they're going to suffer
    >>serious consequences.

    >I'm sure you're right. I haven't used iodized salt for years and have suffered no consequences. Oh,
    >I love those rice crackers!

    A one-pound bag with little bags inside, for $3. There were 3 flavors -- I picked the 'hot mate'
    which includes (a few) wasabi peas and some longish individually-wrapped crackers in seaweed.
    Crunch, crunch.
     
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